Biography

Dr. Joseph R. Boyle received his doctoral degree from the University of Kansas in special education. His current research interests include examining the effectiveness of teaching techniques and interventions for students with high-incidence disabilities in general education and inclusive classrooms. As a result, he has developed a number of classroom interventions for students with mild disabilities in the areas of reading, writing, and note-taking. Dr. Boyle has over 40 publications that include books, research articles, and research-to-practice articles. Many of his research publications have been included in other research meta-analyses and syntheses of special education research and his journal articles have been cited over 250 times. In addition, many of the classroom interventions that Dr. Boyle developed have appeared in special education methods textbooks and research-to-practice journal articles.

Research Interests

  • Disability Studies in Education
  • Reading & Literacy

Courses Taught

Number

Name

Level

SPED 2201

Language Development and Communication Strategies

Undergraduate

SPED 2231

Introduction to Special Education

Undergraduate

SPED 2231

Introduction to Inclusive Education

Undergraduate

SPED 5106

Literacy Instruction for Students with Disabilities

Graduate

SPED 5211

Effective Instruction for Students with Disabilities

Graduate

SPED 5211

Effective Instructional Strategies for Young Children with Disabilities

Graduate

SPED 5666

Introduction to Special Education

Graduate

SPED 5666

Inclusive School Practices

Graduate

EDUC 8505

Assessment and Evaluation of Students

Graduate

Selected Publications

Recent

  • Kennedy, M.J. & Boyle, J.R. (2021). That Really Escalated Quickly—Online Learning Moves Into the Mainstream: Introduction to the Special Issue. Journal of Special Education Technology, 36(2), pp. 63-66. doi: 10.1177/01626434211006052

  • Boyle, J.R. & Joyce, R.L. (2019). Smartpen Technology for Note Taking in Inclusive English/Language Art Classes. Reading and Writing Quarterly, 35(6), pp. 525-538. doi: 10.1080/10573569.2019.1579130

  • Boyle, J.R. & Kennedy, M.J. (2019). Innovations in Classroom Technology for Students with Disabilities. Intervention in School and Clinic, 55(2), pp. 67-70. doi: 10.1177/1053451219837716

  • Joyce, R.L. & Boyle, J.R. (2019). Improving Note-Taking Skills for Students With Disabilities Through a Smartpen Intervention. Journal of Special Education Technology. doi: 10.1177/0162643419856275

  • Kennedy, M.J. & Boyle, J.R. (2017). The promise and problem with technology in special education: Implications for academic learning. In Handbook of Special Education: Second Edition (pp. 606-616). doi: 10.4324/9781315517698

  • Boyle, J. & Kennedy, M. (2016). From the Editors. Journal of Special Education Technology, 31(2), p. 63. doi: 10.1177/0162643416657902

  • Boyle, J.R. & Kennedy, M.J. (2016). Coeditor’s Introduction. Journal of Special Education Technology, 31(1), p. 3. doi: 10.1177/0162643416637164

  • Boyle, J.R., Rosen, S.M., & Forchelli, G. (2016). Exploring metacognitive strategy use during note-taking for students with learning disabilities. Education 3-13, 44(2), pp. 161-180. Education 3-13. Retrieved from http://libproxy.temple.edu/

  • Boyle, J.R., Forchelli, G.A., & Cariss, K. (2015). Note-taking interventions to assist students with disabilities in content area classes. Preventing School Failure, 59(3), pp. 186-195. doi: 10.1080/1045988X.2014.903463

  • Boyle, J.R. & Hindman, A.H. (2015). Scaffolding the persuasive writing of middle school students. Middle Grades Research Journal, 10(3), pp. 43-59. Retrieved from http://libproxy.temple.edu/

  • Boyle, J.R. & Forchelli, G.A. (2014). Differences in the note-taking skills of students with high achievement, average achievement, and learning disabilities. Learning and Individual Differences, 35, pp. 9-14. doi: 10.1016/j.lindif.2014.06.002

  • Boyle, J.R. (2014). Specialized innovations for students with disabilities. In M. Murphy, S. Redding, J. Twyman, & M. Murphy (Eds.), Handbook on innovations in learning (pp. 93-111). Charlotte, NC, US: IAP Information Age Publishing. Retrieved from http://libproxy.temple.edu/

  • Tafti, M.A., Boyle, J.R., & Crawford, C.M. (2014). Meta-analysis of visual-spatial deficits in dyslexia. International Journal of Brain and Cognitive Sciences, 3(1), pp. 25-34. Scientific & Academic Publishing.

  • Boyle, J.R. (2013). Strategic Note-Taking for Inclusive Middle School Science Classrooms. Remedial and Special Education, 34(2), pp. 78-90. doi: 10.1177/0741932511410862

  • Boyle, J.R. & Rivera, T.Z. (2012). Note-taking techniques for students with disabilities: A systematic review of the research. Learning Disability Quarterly, 35(3), pp. 131-143. doi: 10.1177/0731948711435794

  • Boyle, J.R. (2011). Thinking Strategically to Record Notes in Content Classes. American Secondary Education, 40(1), pp. 51-66. American Secondary Education. Retrieved from http://libproxy.temple.edu/

  • Boyle, J.R. (2010). Note-taking skills of middle school students with and without learning disabilities. Journal of Learning Disabilities, 43(6), pp. 530-540. doi: 10.1177/0022219410371679

  • Boyle, J.R. (2010). Strategic note-taking for middle-school students with learning disabilities in science classes. Learning Disability Quarterly, 33(2), pp. 93-109. doi: 10.1177/073194871003300203

  • Boyle, J. & Scanlon, D. (2009). Methods and Strategies for Teaching Students with Mild Disabilities: A Case-Based Approach. Cengage Learning.

  • Boyle, J.R. (2008). Reading strategies for students with mild disabilities. Intervention in School and Clinic, 44(1), pp. 3-9. doi: 10.1177/1053451208318872

  • Boyle, J.R. (2007). The Process of Note Taking: Implications for Students with Mild Disabilities. Clearing House: a Journal of Educational Strategies, Issues and Ideas, 80(5), pp. 227-230. Clearing House: A Journal of Educational Strategies, Issues and Ideas. Retrieved from http://libproxy.temple.edu/

  • Danforth, S. & Boyle, J.R. (2007). Cases in Behavior Management. Pearson Merrill Prentice Hall.

  • Boyle, J.R. (2006). Learning from Lectures: The Implications of Note-Taking for Students with Learning Disabilities. Learning Disabilities: a Multidisciplinary Journal, 14(2), pp. 91-97. Learning Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal. Retrieved from http://libproxy.temple.edu/

  • Boyle, J.R. & Weishaar, M. (2001). The Effects of Strategic Notetaking on the Recall and Comprehension of Lecture Information for High School Students with Learning Disabilities. Learning Disabilities: Research & Practice, 16(3), pp. 133-41. Learning Disabilities: Research & Practice. Retrieved from http://libproxy.temple.edu/

  • Boyle, J.R. (2001). Enhancing the note-taking skills of students with mild disabilities. Intervention in School and Clinic, 36(4), pp. 221-224. doi: 10.1177/105345120103600405

  • Boyle, J.R. (2000). The Effects of a Venn Diagram Strategy on the Literal, Inferential, and Relational Comprehension of Students with Mild Disabilities. Learning Disabilities: a Multidisciplinary Journal, 10(1), pp. 5-13. Learning Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal. Retrieved from http://libproxy.temple.edu/

  • Weishaar, M.K. & Boyle, J.R. (1999). Note-Taking Strategies for Students with Disabilities. Clearing House, 72(6), pp. 392-95. Clearing House. Retrieved from http://libproxy.temple.edu/

  • Boyle, J.R. & Walker-Seibert, T. (1997). The Effects of a Phonological Awareness Strategy on the Reading Skills of Children with Mild Disabilities. Learning Disabilities: a Multidisciplinary Journal, 8(3), pp. 145-53. Learning Disabilities: A Multidisciplinary Journal. Retrieved from http://libproxy.temple.edu/

  • Boyle, J.R. & Weishaar, M. (1997). The Effects of Expert-Generated versus Student-Generated Cognitive Organizers on the Reading Comprehension of Students with Learning Disabilities. Learning Disabilities Research and Practice, 12(4), pp. 228-35. Learning Disabilities Research and Practice. Retrieved from http://libproxy.temple.edu/

  • Boyle, J.R. & Yeager, N. (1997). Blueprints for Learning: Using Cognitive Frameworks for Understanding. TEACHING Exceptional Children, 29(4), pp. 26-31. TEACHING Exceptional Children. Retrieved from http://libproxy.temple.edu/

  • Boyle, J.R. (1997). Introduction to Special Education A Soclal Systems Perspective (2ND ED.) Remedial and Special Education, 18(6), pp. 380-381. doi: 10.1177/074193259701800607

  • Boyle, J.R. (1996). The effects of a cognitive mapping strategy on the literal and inferential comprehension of students with mild disabilities. Learning Disability Quarterly, 19(2), pp. 86-98. doi: 10.2307/1511250

  • Boyle, J.R. & Hughes, C.A. (1994). Effects of self-monitoring and subsequent fading of external prompts on the on-task behavior and task productivity of elementary students with moderate mental retardation. Journal of Behavioral Education, 4(4), pp. 439-457. doi: 10.1007/BF01539544

  • Hughes, C.A. & Boyle, J.R. (1991). Effects of Self-Monitoring for On-Task Behavior and Task Productivity on Elementary Students with Moderate Mental Retardation. Education and Treatment of Children, 14(2), pp. 96-111. Education and Treatment of Children. Retrieved from http://libproxy.temple.edu/