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The War on Slums in the Southwest

The War on Slums in the Southwest
Public Housing and Slum Clearance in Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico, 1935-1965

Robert B. Fairbanks

Reviewed in Environment & Urbanization on July 1. The review read, "A key contribution of the book is the detailed account it gives about the important role of the state in enabling or hindering cities to address the social and economic problems that are at the heart of housing debates. At the same time, it highlights how urban redevelopment and urban renewal, slum removal and slum prevention, and the promotion of social welfare and economic health in the five cities are also fundamental reflections of a cultural turn in the discourse of low-income housing. Although the book examines mostly the period 1935-1965, readers will find parallels to current housing discourses in the US and elsewhere, and the need to declare 'Our War on Poverty, Not Yours on Slums,' as the author outlines in the Epilogue."

Young Men, Time, and Boredom in the Republic of Georgia

Young Men, Time, and Boredom in the Republic of Georgia
Martin Demant Frederiksen

Reviewed in the July 2015 issue of Contemporary Sociology. The review read, "[A]n intimate and compassionate look at the lives of underprivileged young men in the Republic of Georgia.... [Frederiksen] is particularly interested in the tension between a rapidly changing social world and individual experiences of those who feel alienated from this material and societal transformation.... Frederiksen's account of the lives of young men in Batumi should be of interest to readers seeking to understand the situation of youth in post-Soviet societies, as well as to anyone with an interest in the Republic of Georgia or the entire Caucasus region. In addition, by focusing his attention on men rather than women, the author contributes to the emerging scholarship on the frailty of masculinity in post-Soviet societies."

Local Protest, Global Movements

Local Protest, Global Movements
Capital, Community, and State in San Francisco

Karl Beitel

Reviewed in the Journal of Planning Education and Research on June 18, 2015 (online first review). The review read,"Beitel's book [is] a valuable addition to contemporary discourses on urban contestation and an appealing read for urban theorists, social movements scholars, and activists. In his first chapter, Beitel makes the case for taking local movements seriously. He positions his book as an intervention in discourses that depict community organizations and grassroots mobilizations as disabled by neoliberal urbanism.... [The] empirical examinations of conflicts over housing and land use make up the primary substance of the book and are among its greatest strengths.... Beitel offers particularly keen insight into how activists have creatively used the planning and zoning functions of municipal government as points of leverage over urban development, community benefits, and the power of private interests."

Contemporary Social Constructionism

Contemporary Social Constructionism
Key Themes

Darin Weinberg

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of the British Journal of Sociology. The review read, "Darin Weinberg has written the definitive book on social constructionism.... This fine book offers an insightful chapter on the philosophical ancestors of social constructionist argument and a review of foundationalism in philosophy and its critique, from Descartes to poststructuralism.... The book offers a review of the connections between social constructionist argument and studies of the body... [and] a useful historical review of US sociology and social construction's place and promise in it."

Out in the Union

Out in the Union
A Labor History of Queer America

Miriam Frank

Reviewed in Workers World on June 21. The review read, "The importance of Out in the Union is clear from the first page. Here is a book devoted solely to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer labor history, a contribution that is long overdue.... The book is well organized, is a readable length and does not attempt an encyclopedic view. Frank takes a topical rather than chronological approach, devoting each chapter to a different aspect of how LGBTQ workers participate in the life of their unions.... There are instructive stories of LGBTQ union organizers.... Out in the Union is an important book to read, one that has opened up an essential field of study. With all the pain and abuse in the workplace that this book documents, the book is essentially optimistic, pointing towards the growing solidarity of all workers against exploitation, bigotry and oppression."

The Archival Turn in Feminism

The Archival Turn in Feminism
Outrage in Order

Kate Eichhorn

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of the Journal of American Culture. The review read, "The book is important for raising the visibility of special collections and the continued arc of feminist collections specifically. It also raises a question concerning the cultural agent—in this case the archivist, the librarian—as an activist agent, engaged in situating information to render the invisible visible. Finally, the author presents new arenas of research for humanists and information scientists alike in raising questions about queering—decentering—the traditional mission of 'archive' as a preserved collection and advancing it as a tool of engagement."

God Talk

The NFL
Critical and Cultural Perspectives

edited by Thomas P. Oates and Zack Furness

Reviewed on the website Sport in American History on June 22. The review read, "One thing that the authors in The NFL do so well is analyze the larger and cultural meanings of the mundane.... Authors also comprehensively study topics related to cultural themes, particularly on masculinity in the NFL.... The NFL describes the cultural phenomenon of the game, and sheds light on why so many Americans are enthralled with the sport. More importantly, though, it demonstrates the nexus of cultural and social politics with unarguably the most popular form of sporting entertainment in the United States. Any scholar of sport or popular culture would be remiss to not take seriously The NFL because, as the anthology clearly shows, the NFL remains 'one of the most significant engines of contemporary culture'."

Movements in Times of Democratic Transition

Movements in Times of Democratic Transition
edited by Bert Klandermans and Cornelis van Stralen

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Choice. The review read, "This fascinating collection of articles on social movements in times of democratic transition makes a significant contribution to the field.... The authors raise crucial issues social movement organizations experience in Brazil, Argentina, El Salvador, South Africa, and Poland. In each instance, the authors demonstrate that the particular history of a successful social movement shapes and conditions its interaction with the new government. This volume has much to teach social movement researchers and does a superb job of framing the issues. Summing Up: Essential."

Navigating Gendered Terrain

Navigating Gendered Terrain
Stereotypes and Strategy in Political Campaigns

Kelly Dittmar

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Choice. The review read, "Dittmar offers an analysis of the 'gendered terrain' of campaigning, focusing on how campaign strategies shape institutions. Using a feminist-institutionalist approach...Dittmar presents a thorough literature review of the connections between gender and campaigning. She explores the extent to which candidates and campaign teams challenge the inherent masculinity of congressional elections. Her innovative analysis is based on surveys of 223 campaign consultants active in the 2008 elections and in-depth interviews with candidates, campaign directors, and campaign consultants. Ultimately, Dittmar demonstrates that campaign strategies and teams do matter and can shape the gendered nature of institutional norms and frameworks. Summing Up: Highly recommended."

Reimagining Courts

Reimagining Courts
A Design for the Twenty-First Century

Victor E. Flango and Thomas M. Clarke

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Choice. The review read, "The authors propose a series of linked reforms leading toward more, and more intelligent, use of administrative bodies and innovations like drug courts. Flango and Clarke are associated with the National Center for State Courts, and their suggestions are informed by the research done by that respected organization.... The proposals are intriguing and well thought out; many extend experiments currently being tried. Summing Up: Recommended."

Greening Africana Studies

Greening Africana Studies
Linking Environmental Studies with Transforming Black Experiences

Rubin Patterson

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Choice. The review read, "Patterson makes a strong case for the multidisciplinary fields of Africana studies and environmental studies to interact more and articulate the concerns of their shared communities, especially given the unsurprising statistical tabulations correlating cities exhibiting environmental racism with cities housing Africana studies programs.... Summing Up: Recommended."

The Outsider

The Outsider
Albert M. Greenfield and the Fall of the Protestant Establishment

Dan Rottenberg

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Choice. The review read, "Rottenberg has written with verve about the well known yet still somewhat enigmatic Philadelphia real estate and retail mogul Albert Greenfield (1887-1967). His biography is the story of a young Jewish immigrant who successfully ignored—when he could—barriers to eventually become a man with enough financial power to telephone several presidents. Over the course of a lifetime punctuated by spectacular failures and successes, Greenfield owned some of the most notable Philadelphia institutions, played an active role in the revitalization of Society Hill, and was an influential voice in national and even, on occasion, international affairs. Rottenberg based his research on archival collections, newspapers, oral interviews, and an unpublished Temple Univ. dissertation on Greenfield, and the resulting account is mainly laudatory.... Perhaps the most interesting aspect of Rottenberg's biography may be found in the intersection of Greenfield's activities with the changing times in which he lived and acted. Summing Up: Recommended."

Environmental Activism and the Urban Crisis

Environmental Activism and the Urban Crisis
Baltimore, St. Louis, Chicago
Robert R. Gioielli

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Journal of American History. The review read, "Gioielli's book shows the interrelatedness of the urban crisis and the environmental movement during the 1960s.... [It is] a complex tale that Gioielli navigates well.... Crisply written and informative...Gioielli's work largely succeeds in its goals. The book is important to specialists in urban and environmental history and usable in upper-level coursework."

Out in the Union

Out in the Union
A Labor History of Queer America

Miriam Frank

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Journal of American History. The review read, "Based on over one hundred oral histories and interviews as well as wide-ranging archival and newspaper research, Miriam Frank's Out in the Union uncovers new stories for both queer history and labor history from the 1960s to the present. Organized in three sections, Frank's book educates historians of homosexuality in the purpose, operation, and problems of the union movement and educates labor historians in the salience of sexuality in the workplace. One of the strongest aspects of Frank's book comes from the stories of how individual queer workers experienced their workplaces, their communities, and their unions.... Frank provides key insights and implicitly suggests directions for further research. Few historians have grappled directly with how sexuality has affected union leadership, for example, yet Frank encourages readers to think of those questions as key and possibly explanatory.... Out in the Union's greatest strength is...impressive in its scope, both topically and temporally... [Frank] ends up providing a book that could change thinking about union organizing."

Dancing the Fairy Tale

Dancing the Fairy Tale
Producing and Performing The Sleeping Beauty

Laura Katz Rizzo

Reviewed in The Dance Journal on June 16. The review read, "Katz Rizzo's research is impeccable.... [This] invaluable study should be required reading for anyone interested in Philadelphia's ballet history."

Constructing Muslims in France

Constructing Muslims in France
Discourse, Public Identity, and the Politics of Citizenship

Jennifer Fredette

Reviewed in the June 2015 issues of Perspectives on Politics. The review read, "This is an intriguing book on a topic of great current importance.... Fredette is posing a crucial set of questions about Muslim communities, and she offers a scholarly series of answers to them at a time when this undertaking is more important than ever as unrest is transformed into violence and acts of terror.... It is in terms of the relevance of political theory to differing constructions of Muslims that Fredette takes the reader on an insightful and valuable exploration.... And it is in resting her case in terms that the French tradition privileges—the virtues of civic republicanism—that Constructing Muslims in France is at its most authoritative and illuminating."

Suffering and Sunset

Suffering and Sunset
World War I in the Art and Life of Horace Pippin

Celeste-Marie Bernier

Reviewed in the June 15, 2015 issue of Kirkus Reviews. The review read, "Bernier painstakingly examines Pippin's manuscripts, paintings, and sketches to show how his meager written legacy casts revealing light on his other works.... The author analyzes Pippin's work in exhaustive...detail, comparing the scant information of his wartime experience with the stark monotones in his paintings.... [The] in-depth analyses [are] filled with learned conjecture."

Treacherous Subjects

Gender, Culture, and Trans-Vietnamese Feminism
Maskanda Past and Present
Lan P. Duong

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of American Literature. The review read, "Treacherous Subjects productively expand[s] the geographies of American literature by looking at not only discursive but also material circulations of women across oceans.... Duong offer[s] much food for thought in relation to feminism, cultural production, and the collisions of knowledge produced by area and ethnic studies.... [She] demonstrate[s] how writing and art mediates the construction of femininity on a transnational scale, where the former 'third world' is central to understanding current global processes of subjectivity and subjection."

Black Regions of the Imagination

Black Regions of the Imagination
African American Writers between the Nation and the World

Eve Dunbar

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of American Literature. The review read, "In Black Regions of the Imagination, Dunbar develops a fascinating theorization of Hurston, Wright, Baldwin, and Himes as 'native ethnographers,'... Dunbar demonstrates, in four richly complex chapters, how each calls into question racist ideas about black humanity through radical appropriations of the participant-observer ethnographic method used commonly by anthropologists involved in field study. Dunbar's readings are compelling from start to finish, for they collectively illustrate how, in the literary imaginations of Hurston, Wright, Baldwin, and Himes, ethnography was performative."

Reading Up

Reading Up
Middle-Class Readers and the Culture of Success in the Early Twentieth-Century United States

Amy L. Blair

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of American Literature. The review read, "Amy Blair's Reading Up begins with an account of Hamilton Wright Mabie's ten-year stint as literary advisor for the Ladies Home Journal. In that capacity, from 1902 until 1912, as Blair explains, Mabie, a minor though erudite and prolific essayist and critic, had the job of recommending reading for the subscribers to the Journal.... This is an original and intriguing premise, and Blair follows up her introduction with a series of well-chosen case studies that illustrate both the aims of Mabie's reading program and some of the challenges he faced.... [A] fascinating contribution to reception studies... [with] close readings to illustrate how taste is created, with the emphasis that taste is, as the Journal well understood, an important index of social class....well worth reading."

An Immigrant Neighborhood

An Immigrant Neighborhood
Interethnic and Interracial Encounters in New York before 1930

Shirley J. Yee

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of H-SHGAPE, (part of the H-Net network). The review read, "Shirley J. Yee, in her book, An Immigrant Neighborhood, attempts to go beyond [the] imagined boundaries to explore the many ways in which people of different ethnic, racial, and religious backgrounds living in southern Manhattan (her preferred term over Lower East Side) lived, worked, and interacted with each other.... To a large degree, Yee succeeds in this endeavor.... [She] reveals the complex web of commercial relationships and dependencies that marked the lives of most Lower East Side entrepreneurs.... Yee also adds to our understanding of the sources of these interactions by linking them to wider legal, cultural, and economic factors at play between 1880 and 1930."

The War on Slums in the Southwest

The War on Slums in the Southwest
Public Housing and Slum Clearance in Texas, Arizona, and New Mexico, 1935-1965

Robert B. Fairbanks

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of American Historical Review. The review read, "Robert B. Fairbanks has established himself as one of the leading authorities on the history of public housing in the United States.... [H]e has contributed significantly to our understanding of public housing's shifting role in society.... The War on Slums in the Southwest... is a book that both builds on the foundation of [his] earlier work and incorporates the findings of original research to provide a sophisticated interpretation of public housing's changing fortunes in the mid-twentieth century.... Based upon painstaking archival research...The War on Slums in the Southwest deftly builds its case on an impressive array of primary sources.... [T]his volume [is] an essential and at times provocative contribution to knowledge."

Out in the Union

Out in the Union
A Labor History of Queer America

Miriam Frank

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of American Historical Review. The review read, "Clearly this book, which has been 20 years in the making and which is based on over 100 oral histories, is (pun intended) a labor of love. It is committed history—the book begins and ends with the gay marriage of one of the author's lesbian union informants—dedicated to both aspects of its subject matter: LGBT history and the history of organized U.S. labor from the 1960s until 2013.... an impressive history.... [I]t [is] a book to be celebrated for its energy, innovation, sheer endeavor, and its breaching of historical boundaries as, indeed, a labor history of queer America."

Unbought and Unbossed

Unbought and Unbossed
Transgressive Black Women, Sexuality, and Representation

Trimiko Melancon

Gender and Society posted an online first review of Unbought and Unbossed by Trimiko Melancon. The review read, "In Unbought and Unbossed, Trimiko Melancon weaves an insightful, critical analysis of discourses and literary representations of black women in novels by Gayl Jones, Gloria Naylor, Toni Morrison, Ann Allen Shockley, and Alice Walker. Melancon's central argument is that through depictions of transgressive sexuality, the novels defy traditional race, gender, and sexual representations of black women present in American literature. She smartly interprets expressions of black women's agency and resistance to white mainstream and Black Nationalist expectations.... Unbought and Unbossed is an important text for people interested in race, gender, sexuality, and intersectionality. The book opens up new ways to consider the transgressive sexuality of black women within works of literature."

Consuming Work

Consuming Work
Youth Labor in America

Yasemin Besen-Cassino

Social Forces posted an online first review of Consuming Work by Yasemin Besen-Cassino. The review read, "Consuming Work is promising in its detailed examination of the intersection of work, consumption, and leisure for middle- and upper-class (mostly white) college students who work in 'cool' but low-wage retail jobs.... Besen-Cassino's focus...[on] the young workers themselves...is both interesting and valuable, as it gives voice to a group of workers from whom we do not usually hear in scholarly accounts of work... Besen-Cassino rightly argues [that] the youth labor market is a fascinating and important site to explore the reproduction of inequality and other key labor-market dynamics in the United States. In its detailed study of affluent youth labor, Consuming Work provides rich data, many answers, and even more provocative questions to explore."

Making a Global Immigrant Neighborhood

Making a Global Immigrant Neighborhood
Brooklyn's Sunset Park

Tarry Hum

Reviewed online first in the July 2015 issue of Urban Studies. The review read, "Years of research have poured into this rich book that presents a true neighbourhood case study with topics as diverse (yet related) as street vendors, ethnic banks, gentrification, migrant civil society and environmental injustice.... Making a Global Immigrant Neighborhood is recommended reading for all those interested in the intersection of urban and ethnic/racial studies and in particular those interested in migrant civil society, ethnic banks and immigrant growth coalitions."

"I Hear America Singing"

"I Hear America Singing"
Folk Music and National Identity

Rachel Clare Donaldson

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of CHOICE. The review read, "The best intellectual history to date on the subject, this book treats the part of the US folk music revival that aligned itself with progressive politics from the 1930s through the 1960s. Donaldson chronicles the folk revival's involvement with the Depression and New Deal, WW II and the Cold War, and the Civil Rights Movement.... [S]he provides an excellent discussion of the Pete Seeger side of the revival.... [T]hose interested in folk music per se and its intersection with progressive politics during these critical decades will find this book valuable. Summing Up: Recommended."

Red War on the Family

Red War on the Family
Sex, Gender, and Americanism in the First Red Scare

Erica J. Ryan

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of CHOICE. The review read, "[A]rgues Ryan, the Red Scare provided a means of countering the rapid social changes taking place in the late 1910s and 1920s, which included feminism, changing sexual morals, and the rise of companionate marriage. The author has an accessible writing style and convincingly argues her point. The book's nuanced subject matter will enrich research collections and prove most useful to readers at the graduate or faculty level. Summing Up: Recommended."

Senior Power or Senior Peril

Senior Power or Senior Peril
Aged Communities and American Society in the Twenty-First Century

Brittany H. Bramlett

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of CHOICE. The review read, "Bramlett employs social science techniques to explore the empirical prevalence of two phenomena that have become journalistic tropes: 'senior power' and 'senior peril.'... The book contributes some modest additional findings to a topic sure to be of increasing importance in American politics in coming years. Summing Up: Highly Recommended."

America's First Adventure in China

America's First Adventure in China
Trade, Treaties, Opium, and Salvation

John R. Haddad

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Diplomatic History. The review read, "America's First Adventure in China is an impressive accomplishment. Haddad has crafted an engaging, historically grounded narrative that skillfully bridges the neighboring domains of American cultural studies and U.S. diplomatic history... The chronological signposts in Haddad's story are familiar to many, but in his retelling, the familiar becomes intriguing.... Haddad is a skillful narrator.... [His] coverage is brisk, clear and engaging. America's First Adventure in China is a valuable contribution to the literature on Sino-American relations, and a promising exemplar of postmodern narrative history."

Laotian Daughters

Laotian Daughters
Working toward Community, Belonging, and Environmental Justice

Bindi V. Shah

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Social Forces. The review read, "Shah's book takes what seems to be a very narrow project and makes it a very important and broad one that has much utility for scholars working across many fields: sociology of immigration, intra and interethnic relations, youth and gender, refugee and American identity formation and critical citizenship studies, leadership development and environmental justice and urban activism. Her in-depth account of second-generation Laotian teenage girls in an environmental justice organization succeeds in articulating their struggle to challenge 'what it means to be American and are becoming American in the process.' Last, this book is well written and highly readable, and recommended for teaching in both undergraduate and graduate contexts in sociology."

How Racism Takes Place

How Racism Takes Place
George Lipsitz

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Social Forces. The review read, "Lipsitz reminds scholars how fundamental white privilege to our society and how white privilege works.... Lipsitz superbly weaves connections from the past into contemporary issues.... The book offers its readers an astonishing look at unknown events that occurred during the era of Jim Crow, and Lipsitz provides evidence on how it applies to the contemporary issues that we still grapple with in this country: poverty, discrimination, white privilege, racism and violence."

Troubling Gender

Troubling Gender
Youth and Cumbia in Argentina's Music Scene

Pablo Vila and Pablo Semán

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Social Forces. The review read, "Troubling Gender, a monograph focusing on the intersections of sex and cumbia music in contemporary Argentina, straddles quite impressively the difficulty of exploring how those who listen and dance to it negotiate and consume the encoded meanings in this popular music genre.... The book's writing style hits a successful balance between clarity and density, maintaining scholarly sophistication without sacrificing coherence or lucidity. But the most refreshing element of the book is how Troubling Gender is, actually, a textual collaboration.... Vila and Semán's findings stand by themselves solidly, and the historical chapter and postscript excellently complement the authors' arguments."

Sustainable Failures

Sustainable Failures
Environmental Policy and Democracy in a Petro-dependent World

Sherry Cable

Reviewed in the June 2015 issue of Social Forces. The review read, "In this well-researched and accessible volume on our environmental predicament, Sherry Cable asks: To what extent do environmental policies acknowledge ecological principles and enact principles of fairness and justice?... The book is rich in empirical detail, with numerous illustrative case studies and comprehensive inventories of the U.S. environmental policy regime."

Asian American Women's Popular Literature

Asian American Women's Popular Literature
Feminizing Genres and Neoliberal Belonging

Pamela Thoma

Reviewed in the Summer 2015 issue of MELUS: Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States. The review read, "Asian American Women's Popular Literature is a pleasurable read and an important contribution to recent scholarship on Asian American popular culture. As the title suggests, the book uncovers the ways in which Asian American women writers of different genres of fiction directly address Asian American women's political subjectivity and problematize contemporary reformulations of US citizenship and belonging under neoliberalism. The novel, Thoma argues, continues to be central to the development of citizen-subjects even as it now integrates with other media within neoliberal consumer culture.... Asian American Women's Popular Literature offers readers an impressively coherent theory of Asian American women's lowbrow literary texts and the important cultural work they do as popular texts."

Conceiving Masculinity

Conceiving Masculinity
Male Infertility, Medicine, and Identity

Liberty Walther Barnes

Reviewed in the May 2015 issue of the journal Social History of Medicine. The review read, "Barnes' succeeds in providing a vivid account of the so far under researched experiences of men in the infertility encounter as couples are confronted with choices (or lack thereof). Conceiving Masculinity is a very readable story, offering a growing scholarship on the history of infertility and current insights into a gendered order of medical encounters with the body and disease."

Transfeminist Perspectives in and beyond Transgender and Gender Studies

Transfeminist Perspectives in and beyond Transgender and Gender Studies
edited by Anne Enke

Reviewed in Teachers College Record on May 7, 2015. The review read, "Taken individually, each chapter is informative and some are also provocative. Taken as a whole, the volume represents a substantive contribution to the literature on trans theory and practice in higher education and social policy.... There are three primary strengths of this text: the thoughtful navigation of highly contested language, the range of topics covered, and the connections to allied social/academic movements. The nuanced navigation of language that Enke provides is thoughtful and necessarily cautious.... This book has a wide range of audiences within and beyond transgender and gender studies classrooms.... The approachable, accessible writing style of the authors also makes this book useful to many outside of academia as well."

Pimping Fictions

Pimping Fictions
African American Crime Literature and the Untold Story of Black Pulp Publishing

Justin Gifford

Reviewed in the Volume 33, No. 1 of the journal, Clues: A Journal of Detection. The review read, "Justin Gifford's new monograph is impressive. He writes about a genre that historically has been both popular and met with strong critical condemnation. While acknowledging the reasoning for the latter, Gifford argues for understanding well why black crime (i.e., pulp) fiction has had and maintains a robust mass readership.... That dialogue is important for recognizing frankly the complicated legacies of our national past and present. For all the ways that forging a coherent cultural community over time has worked to give succor and strength to blacks in America... Gifford argues compellingly for giving critical consideration to black pulp fiction as a complex literary resource for understanding the complexity of racism and its lingering influences in the United States."

Softly, with Feeling

Softly, with Feeling
Joe Wilder and the Breaking of Barriers in American Music
Edward Berger

Reviewed in Volume 44, No. 1 of the ARSC Journal (Association for Recorded Sound Collections). The review read, "Softly, With Feeling is first and foremost a very well researched and clearly written biography of a jazz trumpet icon who also distinguished himself in the classical idiom. It is also a book about race in America in the 1930s and the decades that followed, and offers insight into the music business, especially pertaining to the role of African Americans.... Overall this is a fascinating book about a marvelous and remarkable musician who could play jazz, classical, Broadway show music and just about anything else as evidenced by his recordings of bugle calls and a very convincingly idiomatic solo on a recording of 'Hava Nagilah' by an Israeli folk group, the Four Ayalons. There are some wonderful photos in the book, many taken by the author, as well as by the subject (Wilder was an accomplished photographer), and a very useful discography/solography for anyone who would like to check out the music of Joe Wilder. Edward Berger can proudly add this well done work to his impressive body of scholarly monographs."

Conceiving Masculinity

Conceiving Masculinity
Male Infertility, Medicine, and Identity

Liberty Walther Barnes

Reviewed in the May 2015 issue of the American Journal of Sociology. The review read, "Barnes explore[s] the experiences of American men diagnosed as infertile.... [She] is attentive to cultural, institutional, and individual perspectives. She describes a powerful association between masculinity and male fertility at each level of analysis.... [T]his book...has much to offer. Barnes had the fortitude to study a population that has been difficult to locate, let alone research extensively. She is skilled at asking questions that yield rich data, and her writing style is very accessible. Moreover, Barnes balances the right amount of empathy and analysis. I would highly recommend this book for those interested in examining connections between gender and medicine."


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