Departmental Research

This degree is offered jointly by the Departments of Physical Therapy and Kinesiology at Temple’s College of Public Health. Faculty research emphases within the departments include

  • ambulation,
  • balance,
  • biomechanics,
  • concussion science,
  • health and patient-reported outcomes,
  • learning health systems,
  • low back pain,
  • movement disorders,
  • musculoskeletal disorders,
  • motor control and learning,
  • pediatric cerebral palsy,
  • pediatric spinal cord injury,
  • shoulder pain,
  • stroke rehabilitation, and
  • virtual reality rehabilitation.

Learn more about research in the Department of Physical Therapy and the Department of Kinesiology.

Research in Temple’s College of Public Health

The College of Public Health is one of the most research-active colleges at Temple University. Research at the college is multidisciplinary and spans both discovery and translation.

Temple is an R1 institution of "highest research activity" as designated by the Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education, placing it in the top 4 percent of all four-year educational institutions in the nation. Temple's research enterprise distinguishes itself through its focus on community, and by using advances in technology to make a positive impact on people's lives.

The Neuromotor Science Research Consortium

The Neuromotor Science Research Consortium is a state-of-the-art facility that incorporates a number of interdisciplinary research laboratories that investigate a range of basic and clinical issues in human sensorimotor neuroscience.

Students collaborate with faculty and postdoctoral fellows in a common space that promotes interaction and provides a rich scientific atmosphere. State-of-the-art technology encompasses several motion capture labs, a split belt treadmill and virtual reality immersive environments.  

The NMS Research Consortium includes the following labs.

ADAPTATIONS TO REPETITIVE MOTION AND STRESS (ARMS) LABORATORY

The ARMS Lab focuses on the adaptation of tissues to stress and overuse, specifically at the shoulder. Current ARMS research includes the integration of translational research to investigate

  • the structural and biologic mechanisms governing soft tissue adaptation caused by repetitive throwing, and the association with throwing biomechanics using novel methods, and
  • the structural, neuromuscular and biologic adaptations that occur because of chronic rotator cuff tears and repairs.

BIOMECHANICAL ASSESSMENT FOR MOVEMENT AND REHABILITATION (BAMR) LAB

The BAMR Lab develops novel assessments and interventions addressing the neuromuscular basis of balance and movement. Current BAMR Lab projects examine gait and postural dysfunction in adults and pediatrics with neurological injuries such as spinal cord injury and cerebral palsy. Additional resources are devoted to developing interventions and technologies that address the needs of these populations.

MOTION-ACTION-PERCEPTION (MAP) LABORATORY

The MAP Lab focuses on sensorimotor and perceptual influences on human movement control, which include central nervous system disease, neuromuscular processes and postural control models.

MOVEMENT ASSESSMENT AND HEALTH OUTCOMES (MAHO) LAB

MAHO is dedicated to the advancement of person-centered health outcomes using modern measurement approaches, qualitative and psychometric expertise, and the development of smart systems of wearable sensors for adaptive data collection. It provides support for psychometric and item bank development, qualitative and clinical validation, and technologies to support patient-reported outcomes in children who have difficulty with self-reporting health concepts. This lab operates in active partnership with premier clinical sites including the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and Shriners Hospitals for Children.

NEUROMOTOR CONTROL AND PLASTICITY (NMCP) LABORATORY

The NMCP Lab works to understand the neural mechanisms of muscle coordination in the human upper extremity. Its research areas include human motor neuroscience and neurorehabilitation after neurological disorders.

PERSONAL HEALTH INFORMATICS AND REHABILITATION ENGINEERING (PHIRE) LABORATORY

PHIRE focuses on understanding people’s quality of life needs and seamlessly assists them through science and technology. The team is currently working on an adaptive feedback app to help those with spinal cord injuries maintain and improve physical activity.

SPINAL NEUROMOTOR LABORATORY

This laboratory is part of the Neuromotor Rehabilitation and Virtual Environment and Postural Orientation labs, and contains equipment necessary for contemporary motor unit and kinetic assessments of the human motor system. The team conducts highly collaborative research and aims to develop life-changing therapies for individuals with neurological injuries through investigations of the motor system.

SPORT CONCUSSION LAB

The Sport Concussion Lab conducts clinical research, and through collaboration with scientists, translational research connecting basic science and clinical practice. The team is particularly interested in elucidating the mechanisms underlying cellular and clinical responses to mechanical stress that occur during concussive and subconcussive head impacts.

TEMPLE UNIVERSITY'S RESEARCH IMMERSIVE BALANCE AND LOCOMOTION (TRIBAL)

TRIBAL investigates how sensory information from the proprioceptive, vestibular and visual sensory systems are used to maintain upright balance during locomotion, in order to develop new techniques and assistive technology for populations with compromised balance control, such as concussed athletes and older adults.

VIRTUAL ENVIRONMENT AND POSTURAL ORIENTATION (VEPO) LAB

The VEPO lab identifies how humans use visual cues to maintain balance and how multimodal sensory inputs are processed and used for postural control. The team currently focuses on the control of balance in elderly adults and adults with cerebral palsy.