REVIEWS | EXCERPT | CONTENTS | AUTHOR BIO | SUBJECT CATEGORIES

Chronicling the sometimes questionable relationship between the International Monetary Fund and Latin America from 1944 to the present

The International Monetary Fund and Latin America

The Argentine Puzzle in Context

Search the full text of this book



Claudia Kedar

Honorable Mention, Luciano Tomassini Latin American International Relations Book Award Committee of the Latin American Studies Association, 2014

"Kedar’s book is one of the most significant analyses yet written on the role of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) in Argentina. Although numerous commentators have dealt with aspects of this important subject, Kedar advances our understanding considerably through her insightful analysis of new sources and fresh conceptualization of IMF relations with sovereign states. Her choice of Argentina as a focus of this study is a wise one, for, as she notes, few other Latin American nations have experienced such a range of interactions with the IMF. The International Monetary Fund and Latin America represents a major contribution not only to the rich literature on political economy in Argentina, but also to the history of postwar Latin America and the rise of the current global financial and international systems more generally."
Eduardo Elena, Associate Professor of History at the University of Miami, and author of Dignifying Argentina: Peronism, Citizenship, and Mass Consumption

The International Monetary Fund (IMF) has played a critical role in the global economy since the postwar era. But, claims Claudia Kedar, behind the strictly economic aspects of the IMF's intervention, there are influential interactions between IMF technocrats and local economists—even when countries are not borrowing money.

In The International Monetary Fund and Latin America, Kedar seeks to expose the motivations and constraints of the operations of both the IMF and borrowers. With access to never-before-seen archive materials, Kedar reveals both the routine and behind-the-scenes practices that have depicted International Monetary Fund-Latin American relations in general and the asymmetrical IMF-Argentina relations in particular.

Kedar also analyzes the "routine of dependency" that characterizes IMF-borrower relations with several Latin American countries such as Chile, Peru, and Brazil. The International Monetary Fund and Latin America shows how debtor countries have adopted the IMF's policies during past decades and why contemporary Latin American leaders largely refrain from knocking at the IMF's doors.

BACK TO TOP

Excerpt

Read the Introduction (pdf).

BACK TO TOP

Reviews

"Kedar’s book derives from her success in clarifying the objectives of the IMF, while describing the conditions under which they were adopted or rejected.... It is well written, exhaustive, and contains many sound judgments. Kedar has interdisciplinary abilities as a historian and an economist."
Journal of Interdisciplinary History

"Kedar's study of Argentine interactions with the IMF is a welcome and impressive addition.... With its clear and straightforward writing, the book is a challenging prompt for comparable studies on Brazil and Mexico, which are long overdue. Its academic significance is enhanced by the fact that it is in line with current debates about the beliefs, actual behavior, and influence of Washington politics on the procedures and policies of multilateral financial institutions, which important scholars...have pushed forward in the last decade."
Hispanic American Historical Review

BACK TO TOP

Contents

Acknowledgments
Introduction
1. Multilateralism from the Margins: Latin America and the Founding of the IMF, 1942–1945
2. It Takes Three to Tango: Argentina, the Bretton Woods Institutions, and the United States, 1946–1956
3. Dependency in the Making: The First Loan Agreement and the Consolidation of the Formal Relationship with the IMF, 1957–1961
4. Fluctuations in the Routine of Dependency: Argentine–IMF Relations in a Decade of Political Instability, 1962–1972
5. All Regimes Are Legitimate: The IMF’s Relations with Democracies and Dictatorships, 1973–1982
6. Routine of Dependency or Routine of Detachment? Looking for a New Model of Relations with the IMF
Conclusions
Notes
References
Index

BACK TO TOP

About the Author(s)

Claudia Kedar is a Lecturer in the Department of Romance and Latin American Studies and in the School of History at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Subject Categories

Latin American/Caribbean Studies
History
Political Science and Public Policy

BACK TO TOP

  

© 2014 Temple University. All Rights Reserved. This page: http://www.temple.edu/tempress/titles/2222_reg.html