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Celebrating Debutantes and QuinceaƱeras

Celebrating Debutantes and Quinceañeras
Coming of Age in American Ethnic Communities
Evelyn Ibatan Rodriguez

Reviewed in the Winter 2014 issue of the Journal of Family & Consumer Sciences. The review read, "Rodriguez makes a strong case for the quince as a source of building, maintaining, and activating key social networks.... Those with little personal experience in cultural rites of passage may underestimate the power and status associated with such rituals. This book offers a chance to re-examine their value, and it gives real-life insight.... This book is an invitation to learn about these special cultural customs."

We Shall Be Free!

We Shall Be Free!
Black Communist Protests in Seven Voices

Walter T. Howard

Reviewed in the Fall 2014 issue of the Journal for the Study of Radicalism. The review read, "Howard's important collection of writing by black Communists bridges two exciting developments in scholarship to which Howard has been a long-time contributor.... We Shall Be Free! is an invaluable contribution.... It helps lift the shadow, especially over figures like [Claudia] Jones, Louise Patterson, and B. D. Amis, without whom the complete story of the U.S. left and black twentieth century history cannot be told. Casting more light onto the archive of black communist voices is essential to this task."

Accessible Citizenships

Accessible Citizenships
Disability, Nation, and the Cultural Politics of Greater Mexico

Julie Avril Minich

Reviewed in the Fall 2014 issue of MELUS. The review read, "[A] necessary and refreshing intervention into disability studies and critical race and ethnicity studies.... Grounded in literary and film analysis with several extended and astute close readings, Accessible Citizenships repeatedly returns to the realities of its major concepts—race, disability, nation, and citizenship—and argues for theorizations addressing the material circumstances that inspire the creation of these texts.... Minich is able quickly to delve deep into the tangled and difficult issues at hand.... The implications and potential applications of Minich's theoretical interventions are great, but there are two...exceptionally important for the fields in which Minich is most centrally engaged.... Accessible Citizenships lays critical foundations for future work in race and disability studies."

Asian American Women's Popular Literature

Asian American Women's Popular Literature
Feminizing Genres and Neoliberal Belonging

Pamela Thoma

Reviewed in the Fall 2014 issue of Washington State Magazine [WSU alumni magazine]. The review read, "[T]he significance of women's popular fiction continues to be overlooked, if not derided outright, by many social and cultural critics. Fortunately, feminist scholars have sought to rectify this state of affairs, and Asian American Women's Popular Literature by WSU associate professor Pamela Thoma is a lucid, convincing, and original contribution to the field."

Rebuilding the News

Rebuilding the News
Metropolitan Journalism in the Digital Age

C.W. Anderson

Reviewed in Digital Journalism, Vol. 2, Issue 2, 2014. The review read, "Anderson's study will be a touchstone.... [The] themes [he addresses] will occupy the attention of news scholars for some time. Anderson has artfully and perceptively raised them for scrutiny. In so doing, he has built a useful foundation for what will undoubtedly be a growing body of work in this area.... This book is an excellent and ground-breaking contribution to the tradition of news ethnography."

Local Protest, Global Movements

Local Protest, Global Movements
Capital, Community, and State in San Francisco

Karl Beitel

Reviewed in Vol. 29, Issue 4, 2014 of Housing Studies. The review read, "Local Protest, Global Movements provides a much needed update to the case literature on urban social movements in San Francisco. In so doing, it makes an important contribution to theory about locally based resistance to neoliberal global capital.... Organizers and scholars of urban social movement theory will be interested in Beitel's analysis of what makes movements successful.... The in-depth theoretical discussions make this book best suited to an audience of scholars and graduate students, though organizers and practitioners may be interested in the lessons about the success of social movements."

Down and Out in Los Angeles and Berlin

Down and Out in Los Angeles and Berlin
The Sociospatial Exclusion of Homeless People

Jürgen von Mahs

Reviewed in Vol. 29, Issue 4, 2014 of Housing Studies. The review read, "Through fascinating presentation and analysis of this qualitative data, and with reference to Los Angeles, von Mahs thoroughly investigates the deficiencies of the Berlin welfare system and its failure to address the various forms of exclusion which underpin homelessness.... The book offers a robust theoretical framework for analysis of homelessness, using the concepts of legal, service and market exclusion as three dimensions of socio-spatial exclusion.... Overall, the book is very well written and offers its readers an extremely useful theoretical and ethnographic framework to unpack the complexity of the socio-spatial exclusion of homeless people."

"Building Like Moses with Jacobs in Mind"

"Building Like Moses with Jacobs in Mind"
Contemporary Planning in New York City
Scott Larson

Reviewed in Vol. 29, Issue 4, 2014 of Housing Studies. The review read, "Larson's argument is intricate and the nuances of political power plays can be subtle wherever the names of Moses and Jacobs are invoked.... This book is a highly readable, indeed enthralling, description of how political forces in New York have sensibly co-opted the ideas of these two influential figures of the twentieth century planning in creating their development agenda. Perhaps, Larson's greatest contribution is that he puts the achievements of Moses and the arguments of Jacobs into perspective. This book can be enjoyed by all but those readers already well acquainted with Moses' work and who have read The Death and Life of Great American Cities will gain more from the narrative presented in it."

"We Live in the Shadow"

"We Live in the Shadow"
Inner-City Kids Tell Their Stories through Photographs

Elaine Bell Kaplan

Reviewed in Children, Youth and Environments, Vol. 24, No. 1 (2014). The review read, "Kaplan demonstrates the value that can come from directly engaging in dialogue with youth about their lives. Through photographs and interviews, middle and high school students living in South Central Los Angeles provide an important and often overlooked insight relevant to a wide range of professionals: these youth see and articulate the neglect and disparaging attitudes that pervade the 'ghetto' environment that also happens to be their home.... Kaplan offers new insights into social theories of inner city youth in that youth have more sophisticated understandings of their circumstances than previous research articulates. Kaplan helps shed light on ways that youth themselves look to larger social and structural causes for their life circumstances.... Her work more clearly defines the inner-city experience of youth who want something different."

Global Philadelphia

Global Philadelphia
Immigrant Communities Old and New

edited by Ayumi Takenaka and Mary Johnson Osirim

Reviewed in the August 2014 issue of the journal, Urban History. The review read, "Global Philadelphia covers an impressive number of ethnic communities, giving it a breadth that often only compilation scholarship can offer.... This book convincingly exhibits the past and present contributions of various immigrant groups to Philadelphia and is replete with information and analysis that refutes the notion that immigration restriction is good policy today. Furthermore, Global Philadelphia subtly challenges the Ellis Island Model, quietly contributing to the new mainstream understanding that New York is overemphasized in the narrative of the immigrant experience in America. Also, the essayists not only show us that peoples from all over the world have been actively participating in the collective formation of Philadelphia specifically, but through extension remind us that immigration has played a central role in the development of the United States more generally. Finally, Global Philadelphia informs us that the formation of scholarly communities may be the best way to understand immigrant communities."

Down and Out in Los Angeles and Berlin

Down and Out in Los Angeles and Berlin
The Sociospatial Exclusion of Homeless People

Jürgen von Mahs

Reviewed in the August 2014 issue of Urban Studies. The review read, "[A] thoughtful account of the impact of public policy on homeless people and their prospects of escaping homelessness.... Mahs has produced a well-researched book that offers a unique insight into homeless peoples' lives in Berlin in the 1990s and thus will surely contribute to a more balanced debate about the geographies of homelessness beyond US cities."

200 Years of Latino History in Philadelphia

200 Years of Latino History in Philadelphia
The Staff of Al Día

Reviewed in the July/August 2014 issue of Pennsylvania Magazine. The review read, "This large-format book is an account of Latinos in Philadelphia throughout the past 200 years. The staff of the local newspaper Al Día has selected several hundred photos with captions and articles from the newspaper to tell about the leaders and citizens of their community and to show the breadth of activities of their residents in all walks of life and work. They tell of the milestones and highlights of Latinos in religious, civic, education and government areas of Philadelphia, and share stories of successes in academic, social, business and industry and medical fields of members of their community throughout our largest city."

The Outsider

The Outsider
Albert M. Greenfield and the Fall of the Protestant Establishment
Dan Rottenberg

Reviewed in the July 1 issue of Library Journal. The review read, "In this mainly laudatory biography, Rottenberg traces Greenfield's unlikely story, beginning as a Russian Jewish son of a textile worker through his rapid rise to fortune as a real estate broker, developer, and banker. Though the book deals primarily with Greenfield's business activities, Rottenberg pays close attention to his subject's struggles as a Jew in a world dominated by the entrenched Protestant establishment..... Readers interested in the history of Philadelphia will enjoy the detailed accounts of Greenfield's role in the development of some of the city's most prominent buildings and businesses, and his relationships with generations of business, religious, and civic leaders."

Softly, with Feeling

Softly, with Feeling
Joe Wilder and the Breaking of Barriers in American Music

Edward Berger
Foreword by Wynton Marsalis

Reviewed in the July 2014 issue of The New York City Jazz Record. The review read, "The new and aptly titled biography by Edward Berger embodies Wilder's deep gentle spirit...Berger's writing is worthy of his subject. The biography makes one feel as if Wilder is close at hand, fully realized. Berger's research is superb but never obtrusive; his prose is understated yet effective. The book offers rare photographs...and a discography full of surprises. Joe Wilder has been wonderfully captured in these pages, a loving, accurate portrait."

Dominican Baseball

Dominican Baseball
New Pride, Old Prejudice

Alan Klein

Reviewed on the Redbird Rants website on July 14. The review read, "Klein's book is sharp and smartly argued as he chronicles the contested relations in the modern era of the game and industry."

Empowering Young Writers

Empowering Young Writers
The "Writers Matter" Approach

Deborah S. Yost, Ph.D., Robert Vogel, Ed.D. and Kimberly E. Lewinski, Ph.D.

Reviewed in Teachers College Record on July 2. The review read, "Each of the chapters makes a case for using the Writers Matter Approach in a variety of contexts and disciplines and for diverse purposes. Furthermore, this book may serve as a useful resource for classroom teachers interested in understanding ways of embedding personal writing into the curriculum through poetry workshops, responses to young adult literature, journal writing, and computer technology.... material within each of these chapters is clearly presented."

Music, Style, and Aging

Music, Style, and Aging
Growing Old Disgracefully?

Andy Bennett

Reviewed in the July 2014 issue of Contemporary Sociology. The review read, "What is compelling here is how Bennett's respondents justify their stylistic transformation.... This provides readers with a rich insight into the association between style and authenticity for (some) middle-aged fans.... Music, Style, and Aging is an agenda-setting work that promises to inspire scholars to study the importance of culture as we age."

Speaking of Race and Class

Speaking of Race and Class
The Student Experience at an Elite College
Elizabeth Aries with Richard Berman

Reviewed in the July 2014 issue of Contemporary Sociology. The review read, "Aries and Berman's book is accessible and engaging. As students describe their experiences, perspectives, beliefs, and ideas, we see and hear, through their voices, how their learning of self, others, and the world around them evolves. The book offers an in-depth look at how engaging with diversity during college years impacts what students learn about themselves and others in distinct ways."

Rebuilding the News

Rebuilding the News
Metropolitan Journalism in the Digital Age

C.W. Anderson

Reviewed in the July 1 issue of Public Books. The review read, "Anderson's captivating book provides a close chronicle of local news organizations' decade-long losing battle to adapt to an increasingly online environment.... Rebuilding the News' detailed description of journalistic work in the digital age belies its title."

Illegal Migrations and the Huckleberry Finn Problem

Illegal Migrations and the Huckleberry Finn Problem
John S.W. Park

Reviewed in the Summer 2014 issue of the Journal of American Ethnic History. The review read, "Park takes an interesting approach to the topic of undocumented migration by juxtaposing it with the famous American novel. While this provides a unique hook for his investigation of how illegal migrants fit into American law, its ultimate utility is in exposing the American tradition of creating heroes out of people who overtly broke U.S. law, using examples like Harriet Tubman. This question of making a right decision or obeying the law is what makes Park's book successful.... Park's work does a wonderful job of showing how immigration policies have large and obvious unintended consequences. But as Park shows, if people put a human face on the problem, then policymakers could fix these unintended consequences."

Intimacy across Borders

Intimacy across Borders
Race, Religion, and Migration in the U.S. Midwest

Jane Juffer

Reviewed in the Summer 2014 issue of The Annals of Iowa. The review read, "Juffer's book is worth considering because it documents some recent history and contemporary trends in one Iowa locale.... The historical substance of her book lies in Juffer's on-site interviews of Sioux County Latinos and others.... Such material is significant for any future historical study.... [R]eaders will glean some interesting things about some recent developments in Sioux County."

Envisioning Emancipation

Envisioning Emancipation
Black Americans and the End of Slavery

Deborah Willis and Barbara Krauthamer

Reviewed in the Summer 2014 issue (Summer Reading) of the American Studies Journal. The review read, "[The] photographs—which are grounded by historical context—explore a long trajectory, vividly illustrating black life from the antebellum period to the end of the 1930s."

"Building Like Moses with Jacobs in Mind"

"Building Like Moses with Jacobs in Mind"
Contemporary Planning in New York City

Scott Larson

Reviewed in the Summer 2014 issue (Summer Reading) of the American Studies Journal.The review read, "[A] timely study... He adopts a critical lens towards city administrators' selective calling-upon of the principles of Robert Moses and Jane Jacobs, manipulating the ideologies of each (often wrongly polarized as incommensurate) in service of advancing a bold agenda.... Larson asks his reader to consider not just how Moses and Jacobs insufficiently sell an urban ideal but how focusing on these historical models distracts from engaging with more pressing issues (e.g., ongoing class and racial segregation and insufficient affordable housing) affecting contemporary cities."

America's First Adventure in China

America's First Adventure in China
Trade, Treaties, Opium, and Salvation

John R. Haddad

Reviewed in the Summer 2014 issue (Summer Reading) of the American Studies Journal. The review read, "Haddad masterfully tells of early American dreams of striking it rich in China.... America's First Adventure in China is erudite yet delightful to read. Haddad gives the reader dozens of well-told historical vignettes linked around central themes, most notably the connections between Americans' actions in China and intellectual currents at home."

John Haddad's America's First Adventures in China was reviewed in the Summer 2014 issue of The Journal of the Early American Republic. The review read, "John Haddad has written an engaging and lucid account of Americans' early experience in Qing China... Drawing on an extensive array of primary and secondary sources, Haddad brings to life the American story of the U.S.-Chinese encounter through skillful biographical studies of important historical figures.... [A] useful book. Readers will close its pages with a lively sense of Americans' conscious pursuit of their own national identity in Qing China."

Men's College Athletics and the Politics of Racial Equality

Men's College Athletics and the Politics of Racial Equality
Five Pioneer Stories of Black Manliness, White Citizenship, and American Democracy

Gregory J. Kaliss

Reviewed in the Summer 2014 issue (Summer Reading) of the American Studies Journal. The review read, "[A] complex and nuanced study, Kaliss clearly shows that there were significant regional and chronological variations in the reactions to integration.... Kaliss makes his case convincingly."

Picturing Model Citizens

Picturing Model Citizens
Civility in Asian American Visual Culture

Thy Phu

Reviewed in the Summer 2014 issue of MELUS (Multi-Ethnic Literature of the United States). The review read, "Picturing Model Citizens provides a new prism through which to view established understandings of the model minority myth and Asian American citizenship. In her brilliant introduction, Phu convincingly argues that civility is central to thinking about citizenship, particularly in relation to the emergence of this myth in the 1960s.... Phu's introduction articulates an important argument about the ways that civility has been overlooked in Asian American Studies.... Picturing Model Citizens is an important study that offers a new perspective from which to view the model minority myth. In placing civility at the center of understanding Asian American citizenship, it is also likely to generate new ways of understanding Asian American history, identity, and community."

Softly, with Feeling

Softly, with Feeling
Joe Wilder and the Breaking of Barriers in American Music

Edward Berger
Foreword by Wynton Marsalis

Reviewed on the website, Jazz History Online on June 1. The review read, "Berger realized that Wilder had an important story to tell, and the result is a superb biography, Softly, With Feeling, which contrasts Wilder's enormous breakthroughs and his humble demeanor.... There's little doubt that Berger's elegantly-written biography will raise awareness of this important but underappreciated jazz giant."

Dominican Baseball

Dominican Baseball
New Pride, Old Prejudice

Alan Klein

Reviewed in the June 13 issue of the Dallas Morning News. The review read, "If you're wondering how this island nation of 9.5 million people has produced such a disproportionate share of baseball talent, Klein knows the territory and history. He walks us through the process by which poor Dominican youth...chase the dream through a combination of Major League Baseball assistance and local player developers (known as "Buscones")."

Music, Disability, and Society

Music, Disability, and Society
Alex Lubet

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of Medical Problems of Performing Artists. The review read, "Alex Lubet develops an effective model for interpreting the relationship between disability and music.... Anyone with an interest in health and music will find this book an indispensable resource."

Sustainable Failures

Sustainable Failures
Environmental Policy and Democracy in a Petro-dependent World

Sherry Cable

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of the Journal of Sociology and Social Welfare. The review read, "As Cable makes clear, her analysis...eschews a clear and distinctive break in modes of production between industrial and pre-industrial societies.... Cable justifies her unorthodox approach on the basis that she is interested in humanity's use of the biosphere in relation to how we acquire the resources and energy needed to stay alive, and how they are obtained, whether that be from machines or animal/human labor, and energy from wood, coal or oil.... [C]hapters of her book, particularly her analysis and the attention she pays to environmental racism, are important and refreshing."

Philadelphia Freedoms

Philadelphia Freedoms
Black American Trauma, Memory, and Culture after King

Michael Awkward

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of CHOICE. The review read, "From its captivating personal narrative of rootedness in the 'city of brotherly love and sisterly affection,' Awkward's self-referential, scholarly treatment presages the rich dynamics constituting the intersections of blackness, race, and 'traumatized black subjectivity' he explores. A model for interdisciplinary scholarship, Philadelphia Freedoms offers a much needed examination of 'commemoration, grief, and riot preventions' across myriad venues: from the experiences of athletes like Chet Walker and performers like James Brown to cultural production, such as music and literature, that challenge black racial oppression, stereotypes of black dysfunction, and black racial trauma in the wake of King's death. Coming full circle, Awkward concludes with Barack Obama, often characterized as the manifestation of 'King's dream,' addressing the particularities of race in America and Philadelphia in efforts to create 'a more perfect union.' Summing Up: Recommended."

The Risk Society Revisited

The Risk Society Revisited
Social Theory and Governance

Eugene A. Rosa, Ortwin Renn and Aaron M. McCright

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of CHOICE. The review read, "This book takes an abstract approach to a concrete problem: how authorities assess risk and direct social policy accordingly. The authors assume an underlying consensus over the common social good on which decisions are made. They recognize a conflict between experts who rely on math and sciences, and ordinary citizens who rely on anecdotes, hunches, and folklore, but then imply that the common good will best be achieved if laymen submit to professionals' judgment.... Risk is not an unchangeable fact of life. It is created by someone."

Disability and Passing

Disability and Passing
Blurring the Lines of Identity

edited by Jeffrey A. Brune and Daniel J. Wilson

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of The Journal of American History. The review read, "The essays collected in this volume on 'disability and passing' confront the historic and ongoing problem of social acceptance faced by persons in the United States who have lived with various forms of disability and yet choose in various ways to conceal their disability and 'pass' as able-bodied. In so doing, these scholars adapt the familiar idea of racial 'passing' and apply it to the myriad ways that persons with physical or mental impairments have passed as 'normal.'... The chapters include novel analyses of physical conditions not traditionally placed under the rubric of disability, such as mental illness, and they also address situations in which disabilities overlap or in which strong physical or mental competencies mask other disabilities that are partially or entirely concealed.... This collection queries traditional notions of disability in productive and provocative ways.... Taken together, these wide-ranging essays usefully expand the history and scope of disability's consequences in American culture."

Just Queer Folks

Just Queer Folks
Gender and Sexuality in Rural America

Colin R. Johnson

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of The Journal of American History. The review read, "[A] fascinating and gracefully composed dialogue between queer theorists and historians of rural America that expands the geography of queer theory.... Johnson finds that rural Americans at the beginning of the last century did not necessarily subscribe to rigid notions of gender and sexual behavior.... Johnson writes with tremendous sensitivity about queer cultures among working men, hoboes, and the "hard women" of Farm Security Administration portraits who operated on the peripheries of femininity defined by access to consumer goods.... [T]he beauty of Johnson's work is that it is truly synthetic. By focusing on a few well-selected examples he reminds readers that he is building new theoretical foundations. For example, to see [John] D'Emilio in conversation with Mary Neth, a historian of rural women, one realizes that such dialogues are long overdue.... [T]he lively narrative in Just Queer Folks is accessible to readers from a variety of fields."

Modeling Citizenship

Modeling Citizenship
Jewish and Asian American Writing

Cathy Schlund-Vials

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of American Literature. The review read, ""In Modeling Citizenship, Cathy Schlund-Vials deftly moves between readings of twentieth-century Jewish and Asian American literature and the shifting protocols of naturalization policy and immigration law.... She persuasively argues that naturalization is a fluid literary trope with its own affective and performative dimensions, a way of reading, identifying, and performing citizenship."

Chang and Eng Reconnected

Chang and Eng Reconnected
The Original Siamese Twins in American Culture

Cynthia Wu

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of American Literature. The review read, "Chang and Eng Reconnected considers the fascinating and categorically elusive figures of Chang and Eng Bunker in both their historical and fictional manifestations.... Wu is interested in the conjoined twins' attempts to individuate themselves according to the imperatives of national citizenship.... Yet Wu urges her reader not to think of the Bunkers as merely exceptional.... Chang and Eng [Reconnected], in terms of both the material it assembles and the methods shaped according to those materials, is itself categorically elusive and resists the generic expectations of a strictly defined and isolate field of study."

Cinemas in Transition in Central and Eastern Europe after 1989

Cinemas in Transition in Central and Eastern Europe after 1989
edited by Catherine Portuges and Peter Hames

Reviewed in the Summer 2014 issue of Slavic Review. The review read, "This is a highly successful and welcome volume that brings together much information and insight.... Individual chapters efficiently balance an often thriller-like historical narrative, built from dense but well-organized information with plenty of names and events inviting further research, on one hand, with a more elaborate, in-depth interpretation and contextualization of select films and directors, on the other.... All of the chapters have much to recommend them, not least because each one creates its own set of major categories that best capture its own cinema.... In all, Cinemas in Transition is an excellent book full of energy and, at times, a welcome passion. It will be an extremely useful textbook for those of us teaching central and eastern European or world film. A fine read for both scholarly and general audiences, with real insight but no potentially alienating jargon, this book is here to stay. I will return to it often for an insider's look into the fascinating cinemas in transition coming from the (still?) 'lands in-between.'"

Transnationalizing Viet Nam

Transnationalizing Viet Nam
Community, Culture, and Politics in the Diaspora
Kieu-Linh Caroline Valverde

Reviewed in the Summer 2014 issue of International Migration Review. The review read, "The author's four major examples of transnationalism, each chronicled in a chapter, provide evidence of what she sees as positive cultural and informational flows between Vietnamese living in both nations and what she considers to be the disruptive and divisive role that anticommunist politics plays among Vietnamese Americans.... This book contributes to the growing scholarship about former Vietnamese refugees and their children, which has developed in the post-settlement period, especially since the early 21st century, when flows of refugees from Vietnam came to an end. It engages with recent discussions, particularly among Asian American scholars, about what Long Le calls the 'work of anticommunism' among Vietnamese Americans (e.g., Reed-Danahay). Transnationalizing Vietnam [sic] adds to scholarship on the politics of culture and identity among immigrants, by working against a monolithic view of ethnic 'communities.'... It is primarily in her discussions of popular music, the strongest parts of the book, that Valverde provides readers with a sense of what 'everyday' transnationalizing processes might look like."

Blue Juice

Blue Juice
Euthanasia in Veterinary Medicine
Patricia Morris

Reviewed in the June 2014 issue of Anthrozoos. The review read, "Blue Juice is a valuable and novel investigation of an act which is so commonplace to veterinarians that having someone from a completely different sphere evaluating what we do is a really useful piece of work. Thank you Dr. Morris."

Savage Portrayals

Savage Portrayals
Race, Media, and the Central Park Jogger Story

Natalie Byfield

Reviewed in Vol. 31, Issue 2, 2014 of American Journalism. The review read, "[Byfield's] insights into covering the story powerfully illustrate the institutionalized relationship between law enforcement agencies and media outlets in the formation of dominant news discourses. Savage Portrayals highlights the connections between the Central Park jogger case and a number of other high-profile and racially divisive court cases to enduring structural and racial inequalities in the 1980s. Byfield clearly and critically examines how through color-blind discourses, factors such as class, sex, and geography act as important stand-ins for race. Perhaps the most important subtext of her argument relates to how class as an indicator of race took on broader significance as an important societal institution.... The continuing significance of race in media depictions of criminality and social order make Byfield's firsthand account of journalistic and criminal justice bias both timely and important."


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