Temple Magazine

Through a Wider Lens

STUDENTS ARE TRANSFORMED BY STUDYING ABROAD IN SOUTH AFRICA.


STORY BY JEFF CRONIN AND
TAUHEEDAH SHUKRIYYAH ASAD

As Ian Watson, Class of 2015, prepared to study abroad in South Africa, he realized how little people knew about the country in which he would spend his summer.

“Do they have the internet there?” someone asked him. “Don´t get eaten by lions,” another warned. Those rampant misconceptions about that nation inspired him to document the everyday people of Johannesburg with his camera.

Watson was among 17 Temple students who participated in the School of Media and Communication´s South Africa Study Away program last summer. Traveling across the country, the photographers documented all aspects of South African life, including mass media, politics, culture and economics in a postapartheid climate. They also visited historical landmarks such as the Apartheid Museum and the Cullinan Diamond mine.

Photographers chose their own themes for their photos. For example, Meaghan Pogue, Class of 2015, used South Africa´s Hare Krishna temples as a way to showcase the postapartheid era. “It seemed to me that inhabitants of neighborhoods were still determined by skin tone and, consequently, wealth,” she says. “But inside the doors of the Hare Krishna temples, all this was vastly different.”

The students´ work was a part of the South Africa program´s social‐media coverage, which won a professional EPPY Award last fall from Editor & Publisher magazine. Here, Temple showcases some of the contemplative, compassionate photographs taken during that trip.

family in south africa
Ian Watson, Class of 2015, took the photos above and below. He says he wanted to focus his photography on documenting the lives of everyday people.

“ There´s a huge misconception in the U.S. about South Africa, and I hoped to show a small slice of how life really is there.”

—IAN WATSON, CLASS OF 2015

boy in south africa

“Studying in South Africa made me feel more comfortable with my photography subjects. It also made me more self‐aware, because for once I was in the minority. It took me out of my comfort zone.”

—KELSEY DUBINSKY, CLASS OF 2015

south africa boxer

south africa boxer 2
A 19‐year‐old boy who dropped out of high school is working to improve his life. Photos by Kelsey Dubinsky, Class of 2015.

“ We were constantly thrust into new experiences that came to shape us as journalists. A lot of what we saw was shocking. People live in vast poverty adjacent to extreme wealth, and that drives divisions between people who otherwise respect their fellow countrymen and
‐women.” —NICHOLAS CUTRONA, CLASS OF 2015


plants

gazellesStudents encounter native plants, impalas and more at Pilanesberg National Park, the fourth‐largest park in South Africa. Photos by Kayla Oatneal,
Class of 2015.