Righting Wrongs
Diane Nelson Bryen is hardwired to help the disabled
Democracy in action
Faculty Senate works to get students to the polls in November
Don't forget
Colloquium
looks at
memory
www.temple.edu
September 9, 2004
Vol. 35, No. 3

Announcements
   Walk for Diabetes Oct. 3 ... Let's help find a cure!
   Come join the Temple University team for America's Walk for Diabetes.
[more]

   The 2004-05 and 2005-06 Academic Calendars are now available at www.temple.edu/registrar/
acad_cals_4~5.html
.

  A Message from Ariel Silverstone, Chief Information Security
Officer
 
   
A number of Temple
e-mail account holders have received
messages that appear to come from various U.S. Banks and companies. Even though each
message may look official, it is a fraud.
[more]

   Associate fiscal VP Chant to retire
   Richard Chant, Temple's associate vice president for budget and fiscal affairs, has announced his intention to retire, effective summer of 2005.
[more]


 
Program gives undergrads chance to shine

Diamond Scholars program pushes Honors students into libraries, labs
    His name is Steven Horowitz, and he's a former Napster user.
    Step one on the path to recovery is, of course, confession.
    "I probably had about 400 files or so on my computer," he said. "I wasn't an everyday user; for me it was more of a convenient service than anything. I was able to get songs you couldn't get anywhere else. I didn't think much at that time on the moral implications, more just the copyright argument, such as whether I had rights to music that can't be purchased elsewhere."
[more]

headline photo
Victoria Palermo (left) is researching the JC Virus at the Center for Neurovirology and Cancer Biology under the direction of Shohreh Amini (right) and Mahmut Safak.
 

Linse takes over helm at TLC
   After a two-year national search by Temple faculty, administration and students - and a series of grueling coast-to-coast trips - Angela R. Linse will make her official debut as the director of Temple's Teaching and Learning Center on Sept. 15. Her self-described mission: "To help Temple's instructors successfully navigate their careers, and to help them make their teaching efficient and effective." [more]

Spotlight | Trustee Mitchell L. Morgan
    After earning his law degree in 1980, Morgan did not step on the Temple campus again until he returned in 2002 for his first meeting as a trustee. Now he is chairman of the facilities committee, applying his professional expertise to planned construction projects at Temple totaling $400 million. [more]

Around Temple
Temple student-athletes officially kicked off the 2004-05 academic year ... Nearly 3,000 Temple freshmen and new transfer students rocked the Liacouras Center and caught the Temple spirit at last week's "Cosby 101." [more]

   

New chair arrives to head journalism dept. [more]

Temple well-represented at ACS meeting in Philadelphia [more]
   
Computer database being developed at Temple will allow for better inventory of chemicals and biological agents [more]
   
Nanoparticles developed that could clean environment [more]

Nonlinear mathematical techniques could mean better flood forecasting [more]

Temple's Bryen hardwired to focus on disability rights [more]

Faculty Senate gets out the vote [more]

Appointments
Introducing
In The News

Awards & Achievements
Research Notes
Bits&PCs

This Week in Temple History
September 13, 1973

    The Temple Times reported that the University will have a Center City address. The building at 1619 Walnut St., which formerly housed the KYW television and radio stations, was given to Temple and was already in use.
The Law School, the colleges of Liberal Arts, Education and Music and the School of Business Administration began exploring and developing courses at the new campus.
    In May 2001, William E. Parshall, the new director of Temple University Center City, announced that the campus was moving to 1515 Market St. Parshall said the decision to move was made because the campus needed more modern classroom space.
    He also said the technological capabilities of the new location would be much better than what was available at 1616 Walnut St.


 
s