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    NOVEMBER 18, 2004
 
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ResearchNotes

Publications

School of Medicine faculty published three papers in the fall 2004 issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons. Jonathan Palma, Walter Long, John Gaughan, Steven Houser, Satoshi Furukawa and Mahender Macha published “Intra-coronary adenoviral-mediated sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPase gene transfection during experimental heart failure improves exercise capacity and hemodynamic, inflammatory and apoptotic profiles.” Philip Stapleton, Tracy Freeman, M. Alexandra Monroy and John Daly published “Genetic ablation of iNOS modulates pro-inflammatory cytokine levels after trauma and confers a survival advantage following infectious challenge.” Fayez F. Safadi, Philip Stapelton, Tracy Freeman, Julian Casteneda, Israel Arango, Steven Popoff and John Daly published “Delayed fracture healing in iNOS knockout mice.”

Grants

Henry Tran and Marsha Weintraub of psychology department in the College of Liberal Arts have received $30,000 from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to study the incidence and effects of young children being placed in multiple, unstable care arrangements.

Dore LaForett and Julia Mendez of the psychology department in the College of Liberal Arts have received a $19,995 grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services to study the relations among effect of risk factors (especially parental depression), protective factors, parenting practices and children’s literacy and socioeconomic development.

Tricia Jones of the psychological studies in education department in the College of Education has received a grant of $165,159 for the first year, with possible funding reaching $504,474 over three years, from the U.S. Department of Education to fund the Conflict Resolution Education in Teacher Education project. The project, a collaboration among Temple, Cleveland State University, Kent State University and the Ohio Commission for Dispute Resolution and Conflict Management, aims to “educate pre-service teachers in conflict education and social and emotional learning for the purpose of increasing teacher satisfaction and teacher retention,” and focuses on teacher attrition and unsafe learning environments.

Nora Newcombe of the psychology department in the College of Liberal Arts has received a grant of $99,900 for the first year, with an additional $50,000 possible, from the National Science Foundation to study the development of geometric sensitivity and spatial orientation in young children.

Sociology assistant professor Julie Press and doctoral student Lynda Laughlin have been awarded $30,000 by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services for a project titled “The Constraints of Choice: The Role of Race/Ethnicity, Class, and Community in Child Care Decisions.” The funding is effective Sept. 30, 2004, through Sept. 29, 2005. Laughlin will use the grant to develop her dissertation based on Press’ findings from an ongoing project, “The Philadelphia Survey of Child Care and Work.” While the dissertation will analyze the function of race and class on child-care decisions, it will especially study the effect of community and urban space on such decisions.

Presentations

Several Medical School faculty presented a paper at the Pennsylvania Medical Society’s annual meeting in Hershey and the 19th annual meeting for the Mid-Atlantic Gynecologic Oncology Society in Charleston, S.C. Thomas Myers; Darryl L’Heureux, a pre-doctoral fellow in the department of neurovirology and cell biology; Vicki Rothman, lab manager in the department of neurovirology and cell biology; Karen Houck, assistant professor of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences; Enrique Hernandez, the Abraham Roth professor and chairman of obstetrics, gynecology and reproductive sciences; and George Tuszynski, a member of biology department and Center for Neurovirology and Cancer Biology, collaborated on the work, “Thrombospondin-1 and Angiocidin as Mediators in the Metastasis of Mixed Mullerian Tumors.” Also at both meetings, Temple Hospital resident Christian Quintero, dermatopathology professor Harvey Sasken, Houck and Hernandez presented “Angiomyofibroblastoma in the Retroperitoneum: A Case Report.”

A number of Temple researchers presented their work at the 26th annual American Society for Bone and Mineral Research meeting in Seattle, Wash. Mario Rico, Stephen Popoff and Fayez Safadi, all from the department of anatomy and cell biology at the School of Medicine, presented “A Mutation in the Osteoactivin/Gpnmb Gene Alters Bone Remodeling in Mice” and “Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) Is a Downstream Mediator of Transforming Growth Factor-Beta 1 in Osteoblasts.” Safadi, Popoff, School of Medicine Dean John Daly, and Israel Arango and Philip Stapleton, also from the School of Medicine, presented “Delayed Fracture Healing iNos Knockout Mice.” Safadi, Popoff, and Rulla Aswad, from the department of anatomy and cell biology, presented “Restoration of Bone Resorption Causes Down-Regulation of CTGF Expression in Osteopetrotic Rats.” Edem Nuglozeh, from the School of Medicine, Popoff, Safadi, and Mary F. Barbe, from the College of Health Professions, presented “Regulation of Osteoactivin (OA) Expression by Osteotrophic Factors and its Role in Mediating BMP-2 Effects on Osteoblast Differentiation and Function.” Rico, Nuglozeh, Safadi, Popoff and Michael Hurley, from the School of Medicine, presented “Retroviral Infection of Osteoactivin Induces Osteoblast Differentiation and Function.” Safadi and Popoff also presented “Connective Tissue Growth Factor (CTGF) Mediates Condensation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induced by TGF-_1.”

At the start of the fall semester, educational psychology professor Glenn Snelbecker gave a series of lectures in South Korea about maximizing the functional relevance of computer technology for educators and students. He presented a keynote address, “Thriving, Not Merely Surviving, with Technology in Education and Training: Responsibilities and Opportunities for Instructional Technology Specialists,” to the Second International ALCob Conference. ALCoB is a consortium of learning community builders within the Asia Pacific Economic Cooperative. Snelbecker later delivered a keynote address, “Thriving, Not Merely Surviving, with Technology in Education: Implications for Teachers, Administrators and Other Educators,” to the Fifth International Conference of the Korean Society for Christian Education & Information Technology. Temple educational psychology professors Susan Miller and Robert Zheng were credited as co-authors of Snelbecker’s presentations.

 

 


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