Oman
Oman

Archaeological excavation in oman

 

Courses, Faculty and Excursions

 

students at fish souk

Courses
Faculty
Excursions

 

 

 

 

 

Undergraduates and graduate students are eligible to participate in the program.

NOTE: The field program ends April 15.  All students (undergraduate and graduate) will be required to complete a 10-15 page (undergraduate)/20+ page (graduate) paper incorporating readings in the field and independent research upon return to the U.S., and other aspects of the field project in general.  Topics will be formalized in the field based on the individual’s personal interest and experience. This paper will be due at the completion of Temple’s Spring 2013 Semester (May 15, 2013).

UNDERGRADUATE COURSES

Undergraduates will enroll in all of the following courses (16 credit hours total). All undergraduates must have completed Anthropology 2705: Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology or Anthropology 2104: Fundamentals of Archaeology (or the equivalent of either course).

Anthropology 3770  |  Methods in Physical Anthropology (4 credits)

This course will examine the methods used by biological anthropologists to study the life and death of past people.   By studying the skeleton and its burial context, we are fundamentally viewing the individual or population from the perspective of death and material remains.  Biological anthropologists have tools, however, to explore far more complex questions regarding the life, as well as the death of the individual or the population.  This includes interaction between ancestors and the descendants who perform mortuary rituals. This is a reading intensive course. Mode: Seminar

Anthropology 3189/Environmental Studies 3189  |  Field Session in Archaeology
(3 credits)

Techniques and concepts of field archaeology will be covered in this course. Students will be evaluated in the field during the excavation, laboratory, and survey work.  All students will experience all parts of the research project including multiple excavation sites and GPS mapping.  Mode: Fieldwork and experiential learning. Note: Students will choose to earn credit for either Anthropology 3189 or its cross-listed course, Environmental Studies 3189.

Anthropology 2364 |  People and Culture of the Middle East (3 credits)

This course will focus on the archaeology in the Middle East (broadly defined to include Egypt, the Levant, Mesopotamia, and the Arabian Peninsula) during the 3rd millennium BC. What was happening in all of these regions during the period that we are excavating in Oman? How did these regions interact? Did they interact? We will address these types of questions in order to contextualize the archaeology we are exploring. Mode: Seminar

Anthropology 3175 |  Heritage Management Archaeology (3 credits) 

The United States and other governments of the world have legal mandates to manage cultural resources on behalf of the public. This course focuses on the archaeological component of cultural resources management in the United States and its link with environmental and developmental planning. Participants are given a working knowledge of how the system works and will compare this process with the nature of heritage management in other countries including Oman. Mode: Seminar & field trips.

 

Anthropology 4083  |  Independent Study (3 credits)
Directed reading and research on a specific anthropological topic. Students will be expected to finalize their independent study topic and conduct a literature review related to the topic during the fall semester before leaving for Oman.

GRADUATE COURSES

Graduate students will enroll in at least 9 credit hours from the following courses:

Anthropology 5770  |  Methods in Physical Anthropology (4 credits)

This course will examine the methods used by biological anthropologists to study the life and death of past people.   By studying the skeleton and its burial context, we are fundamentally viewing the individual or population from the perspective of death and material remains.  Biological anthropologists have tools, however, to explore far more complex questions regarding the life, as well as the death of the individual or the population.  This includes interaction between ancestors and the descendants who perform mortuary rituals. This is a reading intensive course.

Anthropology 5189/ Environmental Studies 5189 |  Field Session in Archaeology (3 credits)

Techniques and concepts of field archaeology will be covered in this course. Students will be evaluated in the field during the excavation and laboratory work.  Mode: Fieldwork and experiential learning. Note: Students will choose to earn credit for either Anthropology 5189 or its cross-listed course, Environmental Studies 5189.

Anthropology 5006 |  Quantitative Analysis of Anthropological Data (3 credits)

The primary goal of this course is to provide students with a solid grounding in basic statistical techniques/methods as applied to anthropological data. Such data is highly variable in form due, in part, to the diversity of research questions being asked and to the methods of collection. The ultimate goal of this course is to bring together various datasets and methods so that students might better assess the results/interpretations presented in the anthropological literature. Statistical packages used will include SAS and SPSS.  Mode: Seminar, fieldwork, and experimental learning

 

Anthropology 8110 |  Problems in Archaeology (3 credits)

This course will explore advanced spatial analysis and GIS modeling of a mortuary landscape. Students will be required to produce an individual project using data we collect in the field. Mode: Seminar, fieldwork, and experimental learning

 

FACULTY

Dr. Kimberly Williams, Director
Dr. Williams specializes in mortuary archaeology, bioarchaeology, and spatial analyses (GPS/GIS). Her graduate education (PhD 2005, The Ohio State University) focused on bioarchaeology of past populations and the use of spatial analysis (GIS) to understand how past people interacted with their physical environment and how this interaction influenced growth, development, and health.  She has conducted work of this nature in Oman, Jordan, and Yemen. Students with questions about the program may contact Dr. Williams at kimberwilliams@temple.edu.

 

Dr. Lesley Gregoricka, University of South Alabama
Dr. Lesley Greogoricka is the co-director of the research project conducted in Oman.  She will be making guest appearances in Oman during Spring 2013. Her graduate education (PhD 2011, The Ohio State University) focused on bioarchaeology specifically with regard isotopic signatures of past populations. She has conducted work of this nature in Oman, Jordan, and the UAE.

 

 

EXCURSIONS

Tentatively, there are two formal excursions planned during the semester. These include a weekend in Sohar and a camel caravan excursion.

 

Additionally, on the two off-days each week, the group will take short day trips to local archaeological sites of interest.

Please note that students will not be able to travel independently while participating in the program.

camels at site