TU Resilience:

Mission Continuity Planning ("MCP") is a university-wide effort to ensure that our teaching, research and service functions are resilient to potential disruption. An interruption in campus operations and/or university functions affects everyone - students, faculty, staff and the local community.

We have organized the development of our plans according to the essential functions that serve our mission. Schools, colleges and departments will determine how they will continue operations during a disruption based on the core functions required.

Mission Continuity Planning is based on the following guiding principles:

1. Health, safety, and the preservation of life are our top priority. TU Resilience focuses on the restoration of services following an incident.
2. Planning will be centrally managed and departmentally implemented.
3. Plans will be consistent in their development and implementation across the university.
4. The university will follow a comprehensive plan to communicate with both internal and external constituents.
5. Each school/college/department must have a working, practiced plan to contribute to restoration of university functions.
6. Plans will be practiced annually, updated as needed, and subject to on-going review.

 

Relevant Literature:

Storm Damage at NYU Library Offers Lessons for Disaster Planning in the Stacks, November 12, 2012

What Katrina Can Teach Libraries About Sandy and Other Disasters, November 14, 2012

New York University Faces Growing Criticism After Superstorm Sandy Kills Lab Mice At Medical Research Center, November 7, 2012

Flooding, Snow, and Power Outages Close Colleges in Storm's Wake, October 30, 2012

 

One Year After...Temple takes on Sandy

'Stay inside, be safe, we got this.'

We were lucky. The storm that devastated lower Manhattan, erased portions of the Jersey shore and left hundreds of thousands in the dark created far less damage in Philadelphia and at Temple. We know that now, but last week, no one knew what the university would face. This is a story of a storm that shut down a city, resulted in canceled classes for two days in a row (when was the last time Temple did that?) and made us all realize that for all of the modern comforts and technology that characterizes our daily lives, nature can sweep everything aside with one big, angry storm.