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Pharm.D. Course Descriptions

Note: Courses Numbered P100-P199 Require First Professional Year Status; P200-P299 Require Second Professional Year Status; P300-P399 Require Third Professional Year Status; P400-P499 Require Fourth Professional Year Status.

 

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences
Departments of Pharmaceutical Sciences/Pharmacy Practice: Integrated Labs Department of Pharmacy Practice
Electives

 

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences

Required Courses
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P151. Medicinal Chemistry I (4 s.h.)

An introductory course in biochemical principles and metabolic pathways with particular emphasis on pharmaceutical applications and biotechnology.

 

P152. Medicinal Chemistry II (3 s.h.)

Study of the various classes of medicinal compounds with particular emphasis on the relationship between structure and biological activity (structure-activity relationships: SAR). The course introduces the chemical basis of drug therapy; molecular mechanisms of drug action; the chemical basis of side-effects, toxicities and drug interactions; and the role of physicochemical properties in the modification of pharmacokinetic parameters.

 

P155. Principles of Infectious Diseases and Immunology (4 s.h.)

This course is an introduction to the infectious process, biotechnology, and laboratory techniques followed by extensive discussion of the immune process and immunology as well as immunological products. The processes involved in disease caused by pathogenic bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites will be discussed in detail. The final portion of the course discusses infections diseases according to the systems of the body (for example the respiratory system) as a summary of the course.

 

P157. Anatomy/Physiology (5 s.h.)

Physiology is the science of how the body functions, and is the basis for understanding modern clinical medicine. Therefore, the goal of this course is for the student to study the body and its structures, starting at the cellular level and then proceeding to the individual systems of the body. The specific topics to be covered include cell, endocrine, nervous, cardiovascular, respiratory, renal, digestive and reproductive physiology. The student is expected to acquire a comprehensive understanding of how the body systems interact to maintain homeostasis. The Educational Competencies and Outcomes covered in Anatomy and Physiology are to think critically; communicate concepts verbally and in writing; and perform mathematical calculations. The development of a solid background in basic physiology, and the integration of it with clinical experiences, will provide the necessary foundation for a successful career in pharmacy.

 

P161. Pharmaceutics I (2 s.h.)

This course covers the format of prescriptions and the organization and contents of monographs and their appendices, the application of mathematics to the preparation of prescriptions and drug products, The design, preparation, properties, and evaluation of solution dosage including incompatibilities and pertinent physical and chemical principles involving solubility and pH effects. Selection of excipients (e.g., color, flavor, buffers, preservatives) and their effect on the performance and quality of these dosage forms is also examined.

 

P158. Anti-Infective Agents (2 s.h.)

This course addresses the pharmacology of all antimicrobial classes (antibiotics, antifungals, antivirals, and parasitocides) and their use in the management of infectious diseases.

 

P162. Pharmaceutics II (3 s.h.)

This course is a continuation of Pharmacy I. It continues with solution dosage forms-colligative properties, and isotonic calculations, ophthalmic, nasal, and optic solutions. Drug degradation and the effect of packaging materials is also examined. The design, preparation, properties, and evaluation of the following additional dosage forms: semisolids (ointments, creams, and suppositories) and dispersions (emulsions, lotions, suspensions, and aerosols) and the selection of excipients, especially surfactants, and their effect on the performance and quality of these dosage forms; chemical incompatibilities among drugs and excipients is covered.

 

P164. Pharmacology I (4 s.h.)

The goal of this course is to teach the student the basic principles of
pharmacology that will enhance their ability to apply this knowledge to the
practice of pharmacy. Specifically, the principles involved in the ADME
(absorption, distribution, meta-bolism, and elimination) of dugs, their molecular mechanism of action (receptors, 2nd messenger transduction, affinity, efficacy, dose-response curves etc.), adverse effects, drug-drug interactions, and misuse are covered. In addition, the underlying pharmacology of drug treatment for the following clinical conditions is covered: asthma, neuromuscular weakness/paralysis (poisoning, myasthenia gravis, etc.), allergic reactions, cardiovascular disorders (hypertension, hyperlipidemia, etc.), coagulation disorders, diuresis, ischemia, congestive heart failure, arrhythmias, gonadal hormone imbalances, osteoporosis, GI disorders (constipation, diarrhea, ulcers, etc.), glaucoma, and dermatologic disorders. 

 

P251. Medicinal Chemistry III/Natural Products (3 s.h.)

The course continues to emphasize structure-activity relationships (SAR) for drug classes with an emphasis on analgesic agents, CNS-active agents, oncology drugs, with material incorporated from pharmacognosy.

 

P261. Pharmaceutics III (3 s.h.)

This course is structured to present the physicochemical and pharmacogenetics principles involved in the latest innovations in drug production and drug delivery systems, as well as their associated biopharmaceutical implications. The special problems of the various routes of administration of particular dosage forms are considered from a physicochemical viewpoint, bearing in mind the physiological as well as biopharmaceutical constraints. Topics in the course will provide a good background to couple the disciplines of biopharmaceutics, drug metabolism, pharmacogenetics, and drug dosage form design. Above all, an effort is made to unite the physical and biological aspects of modern pharmaceutics including genetic factors that modulate drug metabolism.  

 

P265. Pharmacology II (3 s.h.)

The goal of this course is to apply a previously gained understanding of the basic principles of pharmacology to CNS and additional disorders. Specifically, basic principles involved in the ADME (including the blood-brain barrier) of drugs that act on the CNS, their molecular mechanism of action (ionotropic and metabotropic receptors, EPSPs, IPSP, etc.), adverse effects, drug-drug interactions, and misuse are covered. In addition, the underlying pharmacology of drug treatment for the following clinical conditions is covered: nociceptive pain (NSAIDs, acetaminophen, opioids), neuropathic pain, local and general anesthesia, epilepsy, anxiety, depression, insomnia, psychosis, neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer, Parkinson, Huntington, etc.), ADD and ADHD, eating disorders, alcoholism, drug abuse, diabetes, and immunologic disorders.

   
P262. Biopharmaceutics/ Pharmacokinetics (3 s.h.)

The course presents the principles of pharmacokinetics on a broad-based level; Emphasis is given on both the understanding of the basic concepts of drug absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion and quantitative description of the time course of drugs in the body. The principles that relate the dosage and route of administration to the bioavailability and therapeutic response are also discussed.

 


Departments of Pharmaceutical Sciences/Pharmacy Practice: Integrated Labs

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P171. Pharmacy Lab I (1 s.h.)

This lab is the first in a sequence of four labs that integrates principles of pharmaceutics, compounding, application of pharmaceutical calculations, prescription interpretation, analysis and processing; and physical assessment skills. The lab sequence has been designed to integrate with the didactic curriculum and to prepare students for their IPPE experience. In Pharmacy Lab I students will have been introduced to pharmaceutical aspects of a variety of dosage forms. They will become familiar with the requirements for prescriptions and prescription labels including the processing of prescriptions for controlled substances. Students will demonstrate competence in the preparation, storage of solutions, ointments and gels. During the physical assessment labs students will learn how to take and interpret vital signs.

 

P172. Pharmacy Lab II ( 1 s.h)

This lab is the second in a sequence of four labs. This lab will cover the organization and content of monographs and their appendices. Students will have the opportunity to perform pharmaceutical calculations in the preparation of prescriptions and to compound products. The design, preparation, properties, and evaluation of ophthalmics, creams, suspensions, and solid oral dosage forms will be covered. By the end of the course, students will demonstrate competence in their ability to counsel patients about the proper administration of Metered Dose Inhalers, Peak Flow Meters, ophthalmic drops and aural drops.

 

P271. Pharmacy Lab III (1 s.h)

The third of four sequential pharmacy labs correlates with the Pharmaceutics III, Pharmacology II, and the Pathophysiology/Therapeutics courses taught concurrently and focuses on compounding capsule dosage forms and applying properties of drug metabolism to identify drug interactions on prescriptions. Regulations governing compounding of prescription medications are reviewed. Techniques involved in the determination of genetic expression of drug metabolism will be applied and analyzed to demonstrate genetic polymorphism within the class. The students will receive training on durable medical equipment. Students will be evaluated on their ability to correctly compound a randomly assigned prescription at the end of the semester.

 

P272. Pharmacy Lab IV (1 s.h.)

The final course in the pharmacy laboratory sequence is divided into segments, providing students with experience reviewing prescriptions to identify drug related problems; practice preparing sterile products, and CPR certification. Students are required to pass a competency test on prescription processing and aseptic technique by the end of the course.

 

 

01233/Department of Pharmacy Practice

Required Courses
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IPPE: Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience

PY1 Community Pharmacy Students will gain experience in the technical and distributive functions of community pharmacy, bill third party prescriptions, conduct patient interviews, assess medication adherence, review drug therapy, observe and document pharmacist interventions, and counsel patients on the proper use of the MDI/dry powder inhalers in a community pharmacy setting. Communication with patients, other health care professionals, and caregivers is expected. Participation in community wellness activities is encouraged.

 

P140. Professional Practice   (1 s.h.)

An introductory course which begins the process of professionalization. Information discussed will assist students in understanding their legal, ethical and professional responsibilities. Pharmaceutical care issues will be discussed.


P142. Social and Economic Aspects of Health Care   (2 s.h.)

This course is structured to provide students with information relating to the economic tools and institutions used by health care professionals and patients. Economic analysis will be used to examine pharmacy and many of the other health care marketplaces. The role of government in health care will be analyzed since it influences the health care of the population. A number of the health industry organizations including managed care, hospitals, physicians, pharmacists, pharmacy benefit managers, and the pharmaceutical industry will be examined to enhance students' understanding of our health care delivery system.

 

P146. Drug Information   (1 s.h.)

This course is designed to familiarize the student with available sources for locating drug information and to help students develop skills needed to effectively utilize these sources.


P231. Introduction to Pharmacy Care (2 s.h.)

This course is designed to introduce students to the thought process used to develop and document a pharmacy care plan. Students learn how to evaluate clinical laboratory tests in order to monitor drug therapy; an approach for identifying and managing drug interactions and adverse drug reactions and are exposed to the principles of renal dosing, and pain management. This course prepares the student for the subsequent Pathophysiology and Therapeutics courses and recitations. The lectures and patient related cases focus on the data collection and analysis steps in the Pharmacy Care Process. Collection of relevant data is the critical first step in developing a patient-centered pharmacy care plan for your patient.

P233. Pathophysiology/Therapeutics Cardiopulmonary I (3 s.h.)

To understand the pathophysiology and appropriate therapy of common cardiac and pulmonary disease states. The students will be expected to use pathophysiologic information and drug therapy characteristics to develop and support a pharmacotherapeutic plan to treat each disease state. Emphasis will be on interpretation of clinical data pertinent to each disease state, identifying drug-related problems, identifying appropriate therapeutic goals, drug indications and regimens, and monitoring parameters for efficacy and toxicity.

P234. Pathophysiology/Therapeutics-Cardiopulmonary II (2 s.h.)

The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of complex diseases affecting the cardiac, pulmonary and vascular organ systems will be presented as a basis for the discussion of evidence-based drug therapy for these conditions. Monitoring therapeutic outcomes will be emphasized.

P237. Pathophysiology/Therapeutics-Endocrine/Metabolic Disorders (3 s.h.)

The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of selected metabolic and endocrine disorders will be presented as a basis for the discussion of evidence-based drug therapy for these disorders. Monitoring therapeutic outcomes is also emphasized.

P239. Pharmaceutical Care Recitation I   (1 s.h.)

Students work in teams applying their knowledge to develop patient specific pharmacy care plans for patients with disease states being covered concurrently in the Pathophysiology/Therapeutics Courses. Care plans are presented and discussed in small group recitations.


P246. Pharmaceutical Care Recitation II   (1 s.h.)

Students work in teams applying their knowledge to develop patient specific pharmacy care plans for patients with disease states being covered concurrently in the Pathophysiology/Therapeutics Courses. Care plans are presented and discussed in small group recitations.

P248. Communication/ Skills   (1 s.h.)

This course is designed to introduce students to the importance of effective interpersonal communication skills in pharmacy and every day life. A variety of experiences will be provided to help students fine tune their ability to communicate with patients during counseling sessions.

P254. Biostatistics/Medical Literature Evaluation   (2 s.h.)

Students will critically analyze and evaluate biomedical literature. The application of common statistical methods in literature evaluation will be emphasized.

 

P260. Contemporary Pharmacy Practice   (2 s.h.)

This course is designed to cover contemporary issues surrounding the practice of pharmacy. Topics include medication therapy management services, pharmacy-based immunization delivery, USP 797 and sterile product incompatablities etc. This course serves as a test-out for pharmaceutical calculations.

 

P280. Drugs, Devices, and Consumers   (3 s.h.)

This course introduces students to concepts used in assisting people seeking advice about self-care for health maintenance or the treatment of common self-diagnosed medical problems in ambulatory pharmacy settings. OTC drugs and devices, BTC (behind the counter) drugs, homeopathic remedies, and dietary supplements available for self care are discussed.

P330. Pathophysiology/Therapeutics-Gastroenterology/Nutrition   (2 s.h.)

The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of selected gastrointestinal and hepatic disorders will be presented as a basis for the discussion of evidence-based drug therapy for diseases affecting these organ systems. The effect of liver disease on drug disposition will be emphasized. Principles of enteral and parenteral nutrition will be covered. Monitoring therapeutic outcomes is also emphasized.

P312. Adverse Drug Reactions: An Organ Specific Approach

This course will cover the mechanism of adverse drug reactions that affect various organ systems of the body. One might consider this also drug-induced disease. The course is designed to allow the students to identify the mechanisms of these reactions and how they compare and contrast to other non-drug-induced causes of disease, or how they may be contributory. The most common drugs involved in these reactions, treatment of these reactions and preventive strategies to avoid occurrence or lessen morbidity will also be highlighted in this course.


P313. Advanced Clinical Pharmacokinetics   (3 s.h.)

This course sequence is designed to provide the student with exposure to the application of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles as they apply to specific drug classes in various clinical situations. Emphasis will be placed on the use of mathematical principles to predict drug disposition in individual patients. In addition, effect:time and concentration: effect relationships will be explored and application to clinical situations will also be emphasized.


P321. Pathophysiology/Therapeutics-Neurology/Psychiatry   (2 s.h.)

This module will assist students in applyng the pathophysiologic and therapeutic principles of selected neuropsychiatric conditions. Cases will be discussed to provide students with the opportunity to identify key subjective/objective information and to develop appropriate, evidence-based, drug related assessments and care plans. Emphasis will be placed on the students' ability to interpret pertinent data, to identify drug related problems, and to develop therapeutic plans with goals, monitoring parameters and counseling points.


P323. Pathophysiology/Therapeutics-Hematology/Oncology   (2 s.h.)

The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of selected hematologic, and oncologic disorders will be presented as a basis for the discussion of evidence-based drug therapy for these diseases. The rational use of supportive therapy in the management of patients receiving chemotherapy will be covered. Monitoring therapeutic outcomes will be emphasized.


P325. Pathophysiology/Therapeutics of Infectious Diseases (2 s.h.)

This course is designed to increase the students understanding of the pathophysiology and appropriate therapy of common infectious diseases. The students will be expected to use pathophysiologic information and drug therapy characteristics to develop and support a pharmacotherapeutic plan to treat each disease state. Emphasis will be placed on a systematic approach that can be applied to the treatment of most infectious diseases.

 

P332. Pathophysiology/Therapeutics-Immunology/Dermatology/Ophthalmology   (2 s.h.)

The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of selected diseases affecting the immune system, skin and eyes will be presented as a basis for the discussion of evidence-based drug therapy for conditions affecting these organ systems. Monitoring therapeutic outcomes will be emphasized.

 

P338. Pathophysiology/Therapeutics Renal Disorders   (2 s.h.)

The pathophysiology and clinical manifestations of complex acute and chronic renal disorders will be presented as a basis for the discussion of evidence-based drug therapy for these diseases. Principles of fluid and electrolyte therapy will be covered. Monitoring therapeutic outcomes will be emphasized.

P341. Law in Pharmacy   (2 s.h.)

Fundamental legal concepts that concern the health professional are examined. Also covered are state and federal laws related to the practice of pharmacy.

 

P347. Pharmaceutical Care Recitation III   (1 s.h.)

Students work in teams applying their knowledge to develop patient specific pharmacy care plans for patients with disease states being covered concurrently in the Pathophysiology/Therapeutics Courses. Care plans are presented and discussed in small group recitations.

 

P348. Pharmaceutical Care Recitation IV (1 s.h.)

Students work in teams applying their knowledge to develop patient specific pharmacy care plans for patients with disease states being covered concurrently in the Pathophysiology/Therapeutics Courses. Care plans are presented and discussed in small group recitations.

P352. Economics of Pharmacy Management Practice   (3 s.h.)

This course has been developed to enhance the knowledge and skills to support the environment enabling pharmaceutical care to be provided by pharmacists. Financial, managerial, and health economics, form the foundation to apply various principals enabling pharmaceutical care to be delivered to patients. Strategic planning of strategies for future pharmacists will be emphasized.

P406. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience /Inpatient Clinical   (6 s.h.)

Students will apply their knowledge and skills to actively participate in the care of the hospitalized patient. Students will learn to take responsibility for appropriate drug use, and for identifying and solving drug-related problems in order to improve patient care and health outcomes. Written documentation of student interventions and effective verbal communication with patients and members of the healthcare team will be emphasized.

P407. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience /Ambulatory Care   (6 s.h.)

Students will apply their knowledge and skills to actively participate in the care of patients in an ambulatory care setting. Students will learn to take responsibility for appropriate drug use, and for identifying and solving drug-related problems in order to improve patient care and health outcomes. Written documentation of interventions and effective verbal communication with patients and members of the healthcare team will be emphasized.

P408. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience/Community Pharmacy   (5 s.h.)

Students will gain additional experience performing the traditional distributive and compounding responsibilities of the pharmacist while providing pharmacy care to patients in a community or chain pharmacy under the supervision of a pharmacist.

P409. Advanced Pharmacy Practice Experience/Institutional Pharmacy   (5 s.h.)

Students will gain experience performing the traditional distributive, and compounding responsibilities of a hospital pharmacist while providing pharmaceutical care to hospitalized patients under the supervision of a pharmacist.

P410, P411, 412 Advanced Pharmacy Practice Elective   (5 s.h.)

Students complete two elective clerkships to gain experience in specific practice areas of interest. Rotations in clinical specialties, pharmaceutical industry, managed care, long term care, home health care, clinical research, pharmacy management, teaching, The Public Health Service, and professional organizations are examples of elective clerkship rotations.


Electives

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Clinical Drug Development (3 s.h.)

This course will be offered at the Fort Washington Campus.

This course studies the drug development process from discovery through FDA marketing approval. It reviews the process of development and the interrelationships linking the various disciplines introducing students to regulations governing the process, including the interactions with FDA, ICH and other regulatory agencies.

 

0536. Good Clinical Practices (3 s.h.) Unlimited seats.

This course will be offered at the Fort Washington Campus.

Course required for Clinical Research Track.

 

0570. Pharmacoepidemiology (3 s.h.)

This course will be offered at the Fort Washington Campus in the Evening.

Highly Recommended for Drug Safety Track.

The principles of epidemiology will be covered as they apply to the analysis of drug use, drug use outcomes in order to identify potential and actual problems and assessment of the quality efficacy and safety of drugs in specific populations.

 

P315. Advanced Clinical Practice I (2 s.h.) Limited to 22 seats.

Required for Advanced Clinical Track

This course is designed to enhance the studen's skills necessary for practicing advanced clinical pharmacy. The goal of the course is to provide students with an understanding of the full scope of possibilities and responsibilities necessary for providing a clinical service and/or enhancing the practice of clinical pharmacy. Students will get more of an understanding of pharmacy practice by building upon the multiple skills already attained from different courses and applying them in mock scenarios that reflect actual clinical practice. Throughout the course, discussions will take place regarding issues such as life-long learning and responsibilities of the profession.

 

P316. Advanced Clinical Practice II (2 s.h.) Limited to 20 seats.

Required for Advanced Clinical Track

This is the sequel to Advanced Clinical Practice Track I and continues to build upon the concepts and skills presented in the first course. The course is designed to enhance the students' skills necessary for practicing advanced clinical pharmacy. The goal is to provide students with an understanding of the full scope of possibilities and responsibilities necessary for providing a clinical service and/or enhancing the practice of clinical pharmacy. Mock scenarios and classroom discussion will be utilized.

 

P318. Palliative Care Course (2 s.h.) Limited to 25 seats.

Approved for Advanced Clinical Track

This course will consist of a combination of didactic lectures and group activities, which will include: case discussions, journal club presentations, panel discussions, and other activities as determined by the course coordinator. Throughout this course, students will be applying their knowledge of pharmacotherapy to end of life patient cases. Readings will be assigned prior to each class session and will focus on clinical management of palliative problems and social, ethical, and legal considerations at the end of life. Additionally some lectures will require the completion homework as determined by the course coordinator. Students will also give a presentation on a selected palliative care topic in a journal club format. Topics which will be discussed in this course include, but are not limited to: symptom management, physical aspects of dying, common disease state trajectories, cultural considerations at the end of life, withdrawal of care, palliative sedation, and expressing condolences. Students' knowledge and skills gained through this course will also be assessed through two cumulative examinations.

 

P340. Case Studies in Infectious Diseases (2 s.h.) Limited to 30 seats.

Approved for Advanced Clinical Track

This course will provide students with in-depth discussions of pathophysiology, drug therapies, and current controversies in the areas of various infectious diseases, expanding on the current content in the core curriculum. Each week, one group of students will prepare a discussion on infectious disease, drug therapy, or one current controversy in the context of a patient case. Primary literature will be utilized as part of presentation/discussion to support the group's stance on the topic A member of the faculty will mentor each group, with expertise in specific topic to be presented.

 

P346. Practical Politics and Pharmacy (2 s.h.) Limited to 20 seats.

Course is designed to be interactive. Students will develp effective advocacy skills, which they will demonstrate through their discussions with state and national representatives. Students will be expected to stay current on pharmacy and related issues by reading professional journals and using the internet to review state and national legislative updates, relevant newspaper articles, and up to date bill listings and activities on relevant state and federal issues. Students will learn about the backgrounds of their representatives through state and federal rosters.

 

P350. Advanced Radiopharmaceutics (3 s.h.) Limited to 8 seats.

Course required for Nuclear Track; Prerequisite: P368 Intro to Nuclear Pharm.

2 hours of lecture; 3 hours of laboratory

Provides additional depth to the topics covered in the introductory course and has laboratories correlated with didactic material. Students will prepare radiopharmaceuticals, perform quality control tests required by the USP, and use of instrumentation required in a nuclear pharmacy practice.

 

P354. Pharmaceutical Care in Ambulatory Practice (2 s.h.) Unlimited seats.

Course is designed to introduce students to pharmaceutical care services that can be provided by pharmacists in a community or ambulatory setting. Identifying and establishing services needed within the community will be emphasized, especially patient education programs. Recommendation for maintenance of normal health and nutrition methods and counseling to improve compliance with medication regimens will also be emphasized.

 

P361. Pharmacy Practice for the Geriatric Patient (2 s.h.) Unlimited seats.

Approved for Advanced Clinical Track

The course is designed to provide students with an understanding of basic concepts and applications unique to geriatric pharmacy practice. Topics include pharmacotherapeutic strategies in relation to wellness, cure or symptomatic relief, and disease prevention in the aged. Through interactive instruction, students will develop the sensitivity, professional attitude, and scope of clinical skills required for providing pharmaceutical care to the elderly. The course also focuses on the aging process, pharmacotherapeutic planning and intervention, management of selected disease states in the elderly and the pharmacist's role in geriatric care. The use of case study format will allow the student to develop and implement therapeutic strategies that will result in an improved quality of life for elderly patients. Students will be required to complete a written assignment.

 

P365.  Outcomes of Diversity in the Pharmacy Profession (3 s.h.) Unlimited seats.

Students required to complete Studies and Race Admission Requirement must take this course.

Course provides student with a global perspective on the influence of racism in pharmacy education, pharmacy practice and minority health care. Students are introduced to demographic and epidemiological data related to ethnicity and health care, and the historical circumstances that have led to the current imbalance and roles played by minority individuals.

 

P366. Seminar I (2 s.h.) Limited to 20 seats.

Approved for Advanced Clinical Track

This course has been developed to provide students with the opportunity to develop and refine professional speaking skills. Students will also gain experience conducting Medline searches, analyzing the medical literature, and developing audio-visual materials to enhance their presentations. The Seminar Course serves as a vehicle to utilize all of the skills and knowledge you have gained in Pharmacy School.

 

P367. Seminar II   (2 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Seminar I.

Course will build on the skills developed by students in Seminar I. Students will present a formal 45-minute lecture summarizing their research into a controversial therapeutic issue. In addition to refining formal presentaion skills and developing more complex audio-visual materials, the students will practice locating and evaluating primary literature in preparation for their presentation.

P368. Introduction to Nuclear Pharmacy (3 s.h.) Unlimited seats.

Course discusses the development of nuclear pharmacy as a specialty practice and the role of the pharmacist in the preparation and dispensing of radiopharmaceuticals. Emphasis is on the basic properties of radiation, safe handling of radiopharmaceuticals, biological effects of radiation and regulation and control of radioactive material.

 

P370. Seminar in Pharmaceutical Ethics (2 s.h.) Limited to 25 seats.

Approved for Advanced Clinical Track

Course will provide students with the opportunity to identify ethical dilemmas facing pharmacists in their daily practice. Students will develop a process for making ethical decisions and apply this process to scenarios presented throughout the semester.

P372. Current Issues with Medication Errors (2 s.h.) Limited to 40 seats.

Required for Drug Safety Track

Course will provide a comprehensive review of the field of medication errors. Medication errors and human perspectives, the shared responsibility in preventing medication errors, and specific medication errors relating to specific diseases and conditions will be thoroughly examined. Emphasis will be placed on the identification of measures to prevent medication errors in order to provide better patient outcomes.

 

P373. Home Infusion Therapy (2 s.h. Limited to 35 seats.

Students will be introduced to practice issues faced by pharmacists providing home infusion therapy. The course will use a lecture and case study format. Topics include reimbursement, psychosocial issues, vascular access devices, equipment, high tech devices, and outcomes/quality improvements. Students will have the opportunity to develop a plan of care for home infusion patients.

 

P374. Pediatric Therapeutics (2 s.h.) Limited to 25 seats.

Approved for Advanced Clinical Track

Principles of drug therapy in the pediatric patient will be discussed. The role of OTC and prescription medications in the management of common pediatric problems will be covered. Students will have the opportunity to review recent articles from pediatric literature.

 

P376. Women's Health Care (2 s.h.) Limited to 20 seats.

Approved for Advanced Clinical Practice Track

Women's Health explores pharmacotherapeutic health issues specific to women. The topics will range from pregnancy and prenatal care issues of infertility, heart disease, and preventive care. This course is designed to enhance the knowledge of phamacy students in the area of women's health.

 

P380. Case Studies: ADRs (2 s.h.) Limited to 40 seats.

Course Required for Drug Safety Track and Recommended for Adv. Clinical Track

This course will cover the mechanisms of adverse drug ractions that affect various organ systems of the body. The course will be designed to allow the students to identify the mechanisms of these reactions, the most common drugs involved, treatment of the reactions, and strategies to prevent the occurrence of these reactions.

 

P381. Clinical Drug Development - Transition from Pre-Clinical to Market   

(3 s.h.)

This course will provide the student with an introduction to the design and management of the clinical research program from the perspective of the pharmaceutical industry. Discussions will begin with an overview of the business, legal and regulatory issues of the industry, continue with the Investigational New Drug Application process and conclude with the eventual filing of the New Drug Application, including Post Marketing Surveillance of the new drug.


P383. Essentials of Good Clinical Practices in the New Drug Development Process   (2 s.h.)

The focus of this course on current good clinical research practices for the development of eventual marketing to the health care community will be on quality an integrity in the conduct of a clinical trial through compliance with existing regulatory standards.

 

P383. Natural Products (3 s.h.) Unlimited seats.

The object of the course is to introduce the student to many of the alternative forms of medicine that come from natural sources. When the student has completed this course he/she will be a resource to patients who need information on the safety, efficacy, side effects and drug interactions of various natural products. There will be an emphasis on herbal remedies and other alternative therapies. Other topics which will be discussed include: vitamins, nutrients, homeopathy, enzyme therapy.

 

P384. Writing and Publishing a Review Article (2 s.h.) Unlimited seats.

Approved for Advanced Clinical Track

Students will learn how to successfully approach the dual process involved in writing and publishing a review article in the field of pharmacology or pharmacy. They will work as a team under the guidance of an instructor to identify the type of review article, plan a strategy, allocate tasks, gather library materials (including computer data base searching), write the review article (8-12 pages) and submit for publication.

 

P384S. Medication Error Surveillance and Control Planning   (2 s.h.)

This course will discuss the most effective ways to detect medication errors, understand their causes, and reduce the risk of making them. Emphasis will be placed upon medication error surveillance, understanding the basis for human and system error, using medication error data effectively, managing the risks associated with medication use, measuring medication safety and the success of error reduction efforts, and establishing a culture of safety. Legal, consumer, and media perspectives on medication safety will also be covered.

P387. Veterinary Pharmacy (3 s.h.) Limited to 12 seats.

Must have signature of instructor.

This course will provide the student with the necessary information to develop a speciality in animal health and to be able to advise the client/owner on the care of animals and the use of animal products. Discussions will include the differences between animal families (mammals, reptiles, birds and fish), the differences in their metabolism, and an emphasis on critical care. Where applicable, species differences with regard to pharmacological effects and drug disposition of medication will be discussed. Zoonoses, or diseases that can cross over to other species (including humans) will be discussed. Compounding issues concerning animal medications, administration of animal medications and animal models for human research are all topics to be included.

 

P388. Clinical Trial Management   (2 s.h.)

Course recommended for clinical Track (Preferred); Course will be taught Wednesday nights, 6-9pm in Room 437)

Significant changes and advances in clinical research and the adequate protections afforded the human research participant have provided new insights into the drug development process. This course will focus on the translation of these changes and advances to ensure a better understanding of clinical investigation and developing new therapeutic modalities from the clinical site's perspective.