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Chantelle Hart, PhD

 

Associate Professor, Department of Public Health

Center for Obesity Research and Education

Telephone:  215-707-8639

Fax: 215-707-6475

Email: chantelle.hart@temple.edu

 

Department of Public Health

Center for Obesity Research and Education

 

Educational Background:

 

BA (Magna Cum Laude), Child Development, Tufts University, Medford, MA, 1996

 

Intern, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI, 2003-2004

 

PhD, Clinical Psychology, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH, 2004

 

Postdoctoral Fellow, Alpert Medical School, Brown University, Providence, RI, 2004-2006

 

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research Interests:

 

Dr. Hart's research focuses on novel behavioral treatment approaches for prevention and treatment of obesity in childhood. Her research currently focuses on the role of sleep duration in determining obesity risk, particularly how a brief, behavioral intervention to enhance nocturnal sleep can improve eating and activity behaviors, and weight regulation. Additional research interests include the role of parents in obesity risk transmission/protection, early life influences on obesity risk, and dissemination of behavioral treatment approaches for pediatric obesity into community settings.

 

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Professional Affiliations:

 

  • American Psychological Association, 1998-present
  • Society for Pediatric Psychology, 1999-present
  • The Obesity Society, 2009-present


Positions

 

  • Member, Nominations and Elections Committee
    Society of Pediatric Psychology, Division 54, American Psychological Association, 2010-2012

 

  • Member, Awards Committee
    Society of Pediatric Psychology, Division 54, American Psychological Association, 2013

 

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HONORS AND AWARDS:

 

  • Citation Abstract Award, The Society of Behavioral Medicine, 2012

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