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Dr. Bennett Lorber, Chief of Section of Infectious Diseases Dr. Thomas Fekete in the laboratory Section of Infectious Diseases faculty and residents

department of Medicine

Section of infectious diseases

Clinical Services


The Section of Infectious Diseases is predominantly a consultation service, averaging four to five new consults per day. A slightly smaller number of patients are seen at St. Christopher's Hospital. We see about one or two new consults per day at Fox Chase Cancer Center.

 

Temple University Hospital is a 721-bed tertiary urban hospital; approximately 75% of patients are from North Philadelphia and the rest are referred from elsewhere. St. Christopher's Hospital for Children is a 150-bed urban hospital with a similar pattern of patient demographics. Fox Chase Cancer Center is located in the Fox Chase area north of Philadelphia and is a referral cancer hospital of approximately 80 beds.

 

In addition, the Section of Infectious Diseases has a busy travel medicine practice.  Before leaving the country, travelers may have many questions about their health while abroad. They may have been advised to be vaccinated against one or more illnesses and to take medication to prevent malaria. Or, they may be wondering how to keep their vaccinations up-to-date even when not traveling. Here at Temple, we have physicians who are expert in travel medicine issues who can advise travelers on matters of health as well as administer vaccines and provide prescriptions for preventive or therapeutic medications. A telephone call to 215-707-3807 will allow the traveler to make an appointment to meet with one of our doctors, ask questions and get shots and prescriptions. We are available several mornings a week. Travelers should schedule their visit to Temple as early as possible (ideally 2 to 4 weeks) before their planned departure since some of the vaccines take a while to confer protection.

 

Byungse Suh, MD, PhD is the Director of Temple Travel Medicine and is a specialist in the field of emporiatrics (travel medicine). Dr. Suh has directed the Temple Travel Medicine Program for three decades and has immunized thousands of travelers. In addition to Dr. Suh, fellows in Infectious Diseases are able to give advice regarding travel to all parts of the world and assist in the administration of vaccines and oral medications.

 

While injections are necessary for quite a few travelers, not everyone needs a shot! For example, we can give oral typhoid vaccine and spare the injection entirely. Similarly, the preventive treatment for malaria comes in a pill form and has no injections. But if the traveler requires yellow fever vaccine, hepatitis A or B immunization or any one of a number of shots to keep safe while traveling, they can be obtained here -- usually in a single visit!