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Institute on Disabilities at Temple University

RESEARCH & EVALUATION

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The Pennhurst Longitudinal Study

Summary:

The Pennhurst Longitudinal Study was a five-year, in depth review of the effects of the court-ordered deinstitutionalization of Penhurst residents.

Its aim was to provide federal and state officials and others with information to make better policy decisions regarding the processes related to the the deinstitutionalization which is underway in many parts of the country. Federal planners, recognizing the significant for clients, families, communities, and states of Judge Broderick’s and other similar actions, decided in 1979 to launch this five-year study.

This project was unique in several respects; perhaps most importantly as a joint endeavor among the Region III Office of Human Development Services, the Assistant Secretary for Human Development Services, the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation, and the Commissioner of the Administration on Developmental Disabilities, as well as the Deputy Secretary for Mental Retardation in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.

The study has yielded considerable information which is not only valuable to other researchers, but also instructive to legislators, judges, and federal, state, and local program administrators and policy makers. We commend the foresight of the initiators of the project and the dedication of those who completed it. In addition, we acknowledge the thoughtful contributions of the Pennhurst Study Advisory Committee and Work Group. ( Funded by the Office of Human Development Services, The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Planning and Evaluation or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services)

Institute on Disabilities' Investigators, Staff and Collaborators on Pennhurst


Investigator(s):
Celia Feinstein, Jim Lemanowicz

Collaborators:
the Human Services Research Institute


Presentations/Publications


Conroy, J. W. & Bradley, V.J. (1985). The Pennhurst Longitudinal Study: A report of five years of research and analysis. Philadelphia: Temple University Developmental Disabilities Center. Boston: Human Services Research Institute.