Institute Events and Trainings
Institute on Disabilities at Temple University

EDUCATION

Disability and Change Symposium

GRAPHIC: Disability and Change Logo

Wednesday, March 26, 2014
Pre-Conference: 11AM - 11:50AM
Conference: 1PM - 4PM

In-Between Spaces, Places, and Ways of Being


Temple University Main Campus
KIVA Auditorium
Ritter Hall Annex
1301 Cecil B. Moore Ave.
Philadelphia, PA 19122
Directions and parking: www.temple.edu/maps-and-directions

Hosted by the Interdisciplinary Faculty Council on Disability at Temple University.

Speaker Panel and Round Table Discussion with


Rachel Adams, Ph.D.
Department of English and Comparative Literature, Columbia University

Joseph Rogers*
Chief Advocacy Officer, Mental Health Association of Southeastern Pennsylvania

*Mr. Rogers was unable to present. Presenting on this topic was: SUSAN ROGERS, Director, National Mental Health Consumers' Self-Help Clearinghouse and Director of Special Projects, Mental Health Association of Southeastern PA.

Beth Linker, Ph.D.
Department of History and Sociology of Science, University of Pennsylvania

David J. Connor, Ph.D.
Department of Special Education, Hunter College, City University of New York

Symposium Schedule

  • 11AM - 11:50AM

    Pre-Conference Panel Discussion -
    Student Voices on Disability and Change: Temple students discuss the impact of disability in their lives
  • 12:30 Registration
  • 1PM - 1:50PM

    "Manliness in Transition: Disabled Veterans Returning Home from War"
    Beth Linker, Ph.D.

    "Pushing the Envelope: Shifting the Paradigm from Illness/Maintenance to Wellness/Recovery"
    Joseph Rogers
  • BREAK
  • 2PM - 2:50PM

    "From Freaks to Disability: A Conversion Narrative"
    Rachel Adams, Ph.D.

    "Transitioning from School to College for Students with Dis/Abilities: Academic, Social, and Emotional Considerations"
    David J. Connor, Ph.D.
  • BREAK
  • 3PM - 3:50PM, Panel Discussion

Symposium Overview

The 2014 symposium hosted by the Interdisciplinary Faculty Council on Disability at Temple University will investigate disability and change. For example, how can the concept of "transitions" be applied to a variety of disability-related contexts and disciplines? Traditionally in the disability community, the term transition refers to transitioning between, or out of, various institutional contexts. In education, this can mean the transition of a student with a disability from high school into higher education or adulthood. In social work, this can mean the transition of an individual with a disability from a state hospital or developmental center into the community. But the topic of disability and change is also flexible in its ability to suggest issues at the heart of the study of disability and normalcy. The theme will invite speakers examining practical, philosophical, and historical issues that hinge on the idea of in-betweenness, fluidity, and movement between spaces, places, and ways of being. We may consider changes between identity categories, life stages, or disabling/enabling environments.

The DISABILITY AND CHANGE symposium is hosted by Temple University's Interdisciplinary Faculty Council on Disability through a grant from the Center for the Humanities at Temple and co-sponsored by the School of Social Work, First Year Writing Program, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, the Institute on Disabilities, Disability Resources and Services, Department of Art Education and Community Arts Practices, the Dean of Students Office, and the College of Education's Departments of Teaching and Learning and Psychological, Organizational, and Leadership Studies.

For more information, email the Institute on Disabilities at Temple University: iod@temple.edu

Featured Speakers


Rachel Adams, Ph.D.

Professor of English and American Studies, Columbia University

Rachel Adams specializes in 19th- and 20th-century literatures of the United States and the Americas, media studies, theories of race, gender, and sexuality, medical humanities and disability studies. Her most recent book is Raising Henry: A Memoir of Motherhood, Disability, and Discovery, published by Yale University Press in 2013. She is the author of Continental Divides: Remapping the Cultures of North America (University of Chicago Press, 2009) and Sideshow U.S.A.: Freaks and the American Cultural Imagination (University of Chicago Press, 2001). She is co-editor (with David Savran) of The Masculinity Studies Reader (Blackwell Press, 2001) and (with Sarah Casteel) a special issue of Comparative American Literature on "Canada and the Americas." She has also written for the The New York Times, Salon, Chronicle of Higher Education, Gastronomica, and the Times of London and blogs for The Huffington Post. In 2010, she won the Lenfest Distinguished Faculty Award.

Learn more about Rachel Adams' work

Watch an interview with Rachel Adams

Joseph Rogers*

Chief Advocacy Officer of the Mental Health Association of Southeastern Pennsylvania (MHASP), Founder and Executive Director of the National Mental Health Consumers' Self-Help Clearinghouse

Joseph Rogers is a long time internationally known activist for the rights of people with psychiatric disabilities and an inspiring speaker building on his own experiences. His many awards include the Heinz Award for the Human Condition (2005), the Outstanding Non-Psychiatrist Award of the American Association of Community Psychiatrists (2002), and the Timothy Coakley Behavioral Health Leadership Award of the American College of Mental Health Administration (2009), for his leadership in transforming mental health care in this country.

Watch Joe Rogers speak at "Occupy the American Psychiatric Association"

Read Joe Rogers' full bio

*Mr. Rogers was unable to present. Presenting on this topic was:

SUSAN ROGERS

Director, National Mental Health Consumers' Self-Help Clearinghouse and Director of Special Projects, Mental Health Association of Southeastern PA.

Beth Linker, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Department of History and Sociology of Science, University of Pennsylvania

Beth Linker's research and teaching interests include the history of medicine, surgery, bioethics, the body, American health policy, and disability. Her first book, War's Waste (University of Chicago Press, 2011) explains how rehabilitative medicine emerged during the First World War as a national solution to the economic and human devastation wrought by modern warfare. She has published articles in leading medical history journals, such as the Bulletin of the History of Medicine, Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences, and the Social History of Medicine. In 2007, she won the Roy Porter Essay Prize for her article "Feet for Fighting: Locating Disability and Social Medicine in First World War America." Her research and work has been supported by the Robert Wood Johnson Health and Societies Program, the Mellon Foundation, the Philadelphia Area Center for History of Science, and the Barbara Bates Center.

Beth Linker is currently at work on her second book titled Slouch: The Rise and Fall of American Posture. She recently completed an article on the history of scoliosis examinations and treatments, titled "A Dangerous Curve," (American Journal of Public Health, forthcoming) for which she has received Robert Wood Johnson funding.

Learn more about Beth Linker's work

David J. Connor, Ph.D.

Professor, Department of Special Education, Hunter College, City University of New York

David Connor's research interests include social, cultural, and historical understandings of disability, learning disabilities, inclusive education, and kindergarten through college classroom pedagogy. He has authored/co-authored over fifty publications in the form of peer-reviewed journals and book chapters, in addition to four books: Reading Resistance: Discourses of Exclusion in Desegregation and Inclusion Debates (2006); Urban Narratives: Life at the Intersections of Learning Disability, Race, and Social Class (2008); Rethinking Disability: A Disability Studies Guide to Inclusive Education (2010); and, Disability & Teaching (2014). In his school teaching career, Dr. Connor taught all content areas to students with learning disabilities in resource room, self-contained, and inclusive classes.

Read David Connor's full bio

Learn more about David Connor's work

For more information, email the Institute on Disabilities at Temple University: iod@temple.edu

Also Hosted by Temple University's Interdisciplinary Faculty Council

Two hands-on workshops with Philadelphia Theatre of the Oppressed on "Disability and Change"
Saturday, March 15, 2014 AND Saturday, March 22, 2014
9AM - 12PM
The Lounge at the Center for the Humanities at Temple University
Gladfelter Hall, 10th Floor
*Participants are asked to attend both days.

These two hands-on Saturday workshops will explore the ideas of transition, dis/ability, and change through theater games and storytelling exercises based in the Theatre of the Oppressed tradition first developed by Brazilian theater director and popular educator Augusto Boal. You can visit Philadelphia Theatre of the Oppressed to learn more about the T.O. method: http://tophiladelphia.blogspot.com/

A few seats are still available. Registration for the workshops is separate from the symposium above. To register for the theater workshops, please email: kelly.george@temple.edu



Temple University's Interdisciplinary Faculty Council on Disability

The mission of the Interdisciplinary Faculty Council on Disability (IFC) is to foster collaboration across Temple University on disability-related projects including research, teaching, programming, publication, and grant-seeking. By connecting with one another, Council members help build community among the growing number of people at Temple whose work engages with disability.

The Council consists of approximately 30 faculty and staff from 17 programs and nine Colleges and Centers across the University, including the College of Education, Institute on Disabilities, College of Liberal Arts, Tyler School of Art, College of Health Professions and Social Work, School of Media and Communication, School of Medicine, Division of Theater, Film and Media Arts, and Disability Resources and Services.