Institute Events and Trainings
Institute on Disabilities at Temple University

TECHNOLOGY

Assistive Technology Companion Guide to the Transition Health Care Check List: Health Care Skills Needed for Independence

Download the entire document as a text file:

Assistive Technology Companion Guide—Word file (292KB)


A. COMMUNICATION

  • Knows communication methods
    • Verbal—how often are they understood by others
      If an individual's speech is unintelligible to unfamiliar listeners, augmentative and alternative (AAC) communication services should be sought during transition (if not already provided). These may include devices, or sign language or other strategies.
    • Signs/Reads Lips—knows how to arrange for interpreters
      AT Symbol Knows how to arrange for Computer Assisted Real-Time Transcription (CART)
    • AT Symbol Devices—knows how to care for, gets routine maintenance and uses communication aids such as speech generating devices or communication boards independently (see the "AT Skill Inventory"); has back-up systems for "high tech" devices in case of device break-down.
    • Written
      AT Symbol Has low-tech devices that assist in grasping and holding a pen or pencil, or electronic devices for note-taking.
    • If non-verbal, has a support person who is familiar with the individual's methods of communication
  • Knows when, why and how to sign name
    • AT Symbol Uses a name "stamp" to "sign" name
    • AT Symbol Uses signature guides to assist in locating the space where a signature belongs (on checks; credit card slips)
  • Knows how to communicate by phone/TTY/TTD—
    Knows how to obtain lower-cost phone service through Lifeline and Link-up (if eligible)
    AT Symbol There are many telecommunications devices and approaches for individuals with communication disabilities in speech or hearing. Transitioning students may find skills in one or more of the following areas important for accessing telecommunications:
    • Knows how to use relevant relay service (IP relay; video relay; speech-to-speech relay; "conventional" relay; voice carryover; hearing carryover)
    • Uses a phone with amplification
    • Uses a phone with large keys
    • Uses a speaker phone (for speech output device users)
    • Uses a hands-free headset (if difficulty holding the receiver)
    • Knows where to get and/or who will pay for adapted phones (e.g. Pennsylvania Telecommunication Device Distribution Program)

B. VISION/HEARING

  • Corrective lenses
    • AT Symbol Knows who provides services (evaluation, training) and how/when to get a new prescription for corrective lenses, and who will pay
    • AT Symbol Uses eye glasses or contact lenses independently
    • AT Symbol Knows about (or knows how to find out about) other devices for magnification, including lighting, screen magnifiers, screen readers; knows who will pay
  • Hearing devices
    • AT Symbol Knows who provides service (e.g. evaluation), how/when to get equipment repaired, and who will pay
    • AT Symbol Uses hearing devices independently
    • AT Symbol Knows about other assistive technologies for hearing (e.g. assistive listening devices)
  • AT Symbol Asks for accommodations for Vision/Hearing as needed

C. SELF AWARENESS

  • Knows who is involved with decision making and who to trust
  • Knows name, address, telephone number, and who else may have this information
    AT Symbol Using communication device, can tell an unfamiliar person this information
  • Knows height, weight, and birth date
    AT Symbol Using communication device, can tell an unfamiliar person this information
  • AT Symbol Carries personal I.D. when leaving home
  • Knows where their social security card and birth certificate are and when to use them
    AT Symbol Using communication device, can tell an unfamiliar person this information
  • Knows present medical condition and past medical history
    AT Symbol Using communication device, can tell an unfamiliar person this information
  • Has received training in and understands human sexuality
    AT Symbol For augmentative communication device users, the user has access to programmed vocabulary related to sexuality
  • Understands who can help
    • Knows health emergency telephone numbers
      AT Symbol Using communication device, can tell an unfamiliar person this information; using PDA (e.g. a "Palm Pilot") can retrieve emergency telephone numbers
    • Knows how to dial emergency numbers
      AT Symbol Uses a phone with pre-programmed "auto dial" emergency numbers

D. ACTIVITIES OF DAILY LIVING (ADL) AND SAFETY

  • Understands Hot and Cold
    AT Symbol Faucets are clearly marked with colors, symbols, or text to differentiate temperature
  • Knows how to use and read different types of thermometers
    AT Symbol Knows where to get and how to use a "talking" thermometer
  • Can treat minor cuts, scrapes, burns
  • Knows how to use household chemicals properly and does not mix them
  • Knows how to protect themselves by wearing gloves and safety glasses
  • Can read labels or knows who to ask
    • AT Symbol Uses Braille "tags" as appropriate
    • AT Symbol Uses a bar code reader on coded prescription bottles or other items
    • AT Symbol Uses CCTV in order to read labels
  • Understands the proper use of matches
  • Has emergency, fire, and disaster plans made
    AT Symbol Accessible evacuation slides or special evacuation wheelchairs are in place; everyone knows how to use them
  • Responds appropriately to fire alarms / knows fire exits / knows meeting place
    AT Symbol Fire alarms in all of the individual's environments provide detectible signals, e.g. flashing strobe lights for an individual who is deaf
  • Has a fire extinguisher and smoke detector and knows how to use and maintain correctly
    AT Symbol Has smoke detectors with perceivable signals (e.g. flashing lights and vibration if deaf/blind)

E. TRANSPORTATION

  • Knows who can provide transportation and how to make arrangements.
    AT Symbol Knows availability of and how to apply for paratransit or shared ride programs
  • AT Symbol Knows about equipment needed
    • AT Symbol Knows about adaptations for driving (zero-effort steering; hand controls; lift and ramp-equipped vehicles) and how to obtain an evaluation, lessons, etc.
    • AT Symbol Knows about adaptations needed to be a passenger in a private vehicle or on public transportation (including how wheelchair can be stowed or "tied down" for safe riding in a car or on the train)
  • AT Symbol Knows about funding or saving money to purchase a vehicle, needed adaptations or services
  • Knows how to apply for PENNDOT's accessible parking placard
  • Understands safety aspects of walking
    • AT Symbol Uses GPS system
    • AT Symbol Uses sonar cane

F. NUTRITION

  • Understands and can deal safely with food allergies
    AT Symbol Using communication device, can tell an unfamiliar person information about food allergies
  • Understands specialized diets, foods, and medical follow up
  • Understands healthy food choices
  • Understands funding and budgeting for the purchase of food
    AT Symbol Uses large key calculator and picture "shopping cards" when developing a shopping list prior to going to the supermarket

G. FITNESS

  • Understands the benefits of a health and fitness program
  • Participates in physical activity with modifications as needed
    • AT Symbol Knows community resources that are accessible, e.g. which facilities have a swimming pool with a lift or ramp, or how to find out this information
    • AT Symbol Knows about community resources that have "adaptive sports" programs such as rowing, biking, skiing, or diving, or how to find out this information
    • AT Symbol Uses specialized equipment for physical activity, e.g. hand cycle
  • Knows and understands the dangers of drugs, alcohol and abusive behaviors
  • Knows where and how to get help to maintain a healthy lifestyle

Next: Assistive Technology Companion Guide to the Transition Health Care Check List: Health Care Skills Needed for Independence, continued

Back: Transition Health Care Check List Introduction


Download the entire document as a text file:
Assistive Technology Companion Guide—Word file (292KB)