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TRANSFORMATIONAL INTERGROUP DIALOGUE TRAIN-THE-TRAINER PROGRAM

Temple University Center for Social Justice and Multicultural Education offers its diversity education training services to institutions implementing an intergroup dialogue program. Temple University’s Transformational Intergroup Dialogue Train-the-Trainer Program serves as the model for this training program. This program is geared towards professionals and/or student leaders who are interested in improving their skills in developing, implementing and facilitating intergroup dialogue programs, as well as those in the areas of cross-cultural communication; intercultural relations; teaching courses on race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, class, and multicultural education; developing connections across student organizations; and providing support for community development and experiential learning.

Transformational Intergroup Dialogue draws from two well-known and successful models for promoting democratic dialogue, action and civic engagement in the context of diversity: (a) theMichigan Intergroup Relations Model (http://www.igr.umich.edu/), a process used by the University of Michigan and universities throughout the United States to promote intergroup dialogue and engagement in higher education and community settings; and (b)Transformational Social Therapy(TST), a process used internationally to promote knowledge sharing and collaborative action involving diverse parties in municipalities, civil society, educational settings, and other public arenas. Both models are informed by the theory and practice of multicultural citizenship and theory and research on learning and equitable social change in the context of diversity. TST’s grounding in depth psychology and critical social theory complements the Michigan Model by contributing a more robust understanding of the ways human needs and social structures interact and influence intergroup behavior.

TRAINING PEDAGOGY AND LEARNING GOALS

The training pedagogy will integrate academic and experiential learning and intergroup dialogue practice. Participants will develop personal and interpersonal capacities for diversity/intergroup facilitation, including emotional intelligence (self-awareness, self-confidence, empathy, trustworthiness, relationship building); multicultural awareness (seeing differences as assets; willingness to examine one’s own cultural assumptions, values, biases, and worldview); and awareness of power dynamics in groups and institutions. 

The goal is for participants to be able to:

  • Facilitate dialogues about difficult diversity issues in ways that further group functioning and group outcomes;
  • Gain the trust and respect of individuals who are culturally different from themselves;
  • Help a diverse group gather sound information from its members and use it to inform a collective action project.

The training will make significant use of experiential learning pedagogy, which means that an important focus is on learning by reflecting on one’s experience, while also bringing academic knowledge (readings, theories and integrative discussions) to bear on deepening participants’ understanding.  Another aspect of this pedagogy is that participants’ direct their own learning by electing to explore in more depth issues that become significant to them. This is done by participants identifying their own learning goals within the larger context of the learning goals of the training.

Participants will engage in activities relevant to emotional intelligence, group membership and diversity and to the practice of facilitating intergroup dialogues and leading diverse groups. Developing these capacities requires first, the facilitator’s self-awareness about his/her own positionality and attitudes regarding diversity; and  second, the capacity to develop trust and shared motivations among diverse group members. Included in self-awareness is awareness of (a) any biases one may hold and how one may overcome them; (b) the roles one enacts in different contexts; and (c) the ways one participates in collaborative situations. The development of collaboration in a diverse group involves participants’ awareness of the masks we all wear; and (b) creating relationships and an environment in which participants feel free to drop their masks and speak relatively freely about difficult topics.

The training will deepen participants’ understanding of how to work with diverse groups in professional settings.  Participants will review their personal and professional masks, and the ways their fears influence attitudes and behaviors related to social group identity. There will be a significant focus on understanding the socio-psychological bases of social identity and intergroup prejudice and violence; and practicing the “leader as a tool”.

DATES, TIMES, AND LOCATION:

Wednesday, July 23, 2014 at 1pm to Friday, July 25, 2014 at 5pm. The location for the training is the main campus of Temple University, 1801 N. Broad Street, Conwell Hall, Suite 303.

FOR REGISTRATION INFORMATION CLICK HERE.

POTENTIAL FACILITATORS:

TCHET DEREIC DORMAN

Tchet Dereic Dormanis the Director of the Center for Social Justice and Multicultural Education in the Office of Institutional Diversity, Equity, Advocacy and Leadership at Temple University. Tchet has a wide variety of experiences over the past 25 years as a university instructor and administrator, having worked at 14higher education institutions, including Temple University, Lebanon Valley College, Albright College, Swarthmore College, the University of Pennsylvania, Oberlin College, and Philadelphia University.

As the Director of the Center he created Temple’s first Intergroup Dialogue Program, facilitating sustained dialogue groups related to race, gender/sexism, sexual orientation, religion and socio-economic status for students, faculty, staff and professionals from throughout the region; created the Intergroup Dialogues Facilitator Training Institute, providing a train-the-trainer opportunity for faculty, administrators, and professionals. Over the past two year’s, the Institute has sponsored a one-day symposium titled Real Talk: Engaging Diversity through Intergroup Dialogue (http://www.temple.edu/ideal/sss/IGD/EngagingDiversitySymposium.html) to provide professional development to faculty, teachers, administrators, social service professionals, community leaders and activistsfrom throughout the Philadelphia region. Furthermore, over the past three years, he has co-sponsored faculty development and training related to race through Temple’s Teaching and Learning Center (http://diverseeducation.com/article/51111/#).

As an outgrowth of the Intergroup Dialogue Program, he developed a strategic partnership with the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies of the College of Education to create the Graduate Certificate in Diversity Leadership (http://www.temple.edu/ideal/CertificateinDiversityLeadership.html), a four-course, twelve-credit graduate diversity education program geared for professionals who teach, facilitate, train and lead in educational, community, corporate and public settings. The Certificate has provided an intensive model for intercultural skill development for a wide variety of professionals from throughout the Philadelphia region, providing a unique opportunity for faculty, administrators, and other professionals to learn the Transformational Social Therapy model. As part of the Certificate he co-teaches the first course, Emotions, Diversity and Democratic Leadership.

He has also been the Director of Multicultural Affairs at both Albright College and Lebanon Valley College and the Director of the Ronald McNair Faculty-In-Training Program at Temple University. He also taught courses at Temple, including African American History, African Literature and Introduction to African American Studies; at Community College of Philadelphia, he has taught Introduction to Sociology and Cultural Anthropology; taught a Multiculturalism and the American Identity at LVC; and taught Black History at Harrisburg Area Community College.

He served as the National Secretary of the African Heritage Studies Association for over five years, the President of the Pennsylvania chapter of the National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME)and presently serves on the national board of NAME as a Regional Director.For the past eight years, he has been a major organizer of the Pennsylvania Association of Liaisons and Officers of Multicultural Affairs on the statewide level and in both central and southeastern Pennsylvania.

He has also made over 100 presentations promoting multicultural competency, inclusion, bias awareness, and leadership development at conferences, educational institutions, and various organizations across the country. In 2007, Tchet received theEducator of the Year Awardfrom the National Association for Multicultural Education.

Tchet is an advanced doctoral student in African American Studies at Temple University, where he also received his master’s in African American Studies. He received his bachelor’s degree in Black Studies and Government from Oberlin College in Ohio.

DR. PAMELA E. BARNETT

Dr. Pamela E. Barnett is an Associate Vice Provost and Director of Temple University’s Teaching and Learning Center which provides programs and consultations to enhance the teaching of faculty and teaching assistants. She earned Temple’s Certificate in Diversity Leadership in 2011, and has written about methods she learned through that program for encouraging honest, productive discussion about hot topics. (See "Discussions across difference: addressing the affective dimensions of teaching diverse students about diversity", Teaching in Higher Education,2011).

Prior to her work in instructional development, she was Associate Professor of English and African American Studies at the University of South Carolina. Her book Dangerous Desire: Literature of Sexual Freedom and Sexual Violence Since the Sixties (Routledge, 2004) examines literature written in response to the liberation movements of the 1960’s. She is currently working on a book about how faculty social identities impact teaching and learning and is on the editorial board forTransformations: The Journal of Inclusive Scholarship and Pedagogy.

Previously, Dr. Barnett worked as the associate director of the McGraw Center for Teaching and Learning at Princeton University. Prior to assuming this position, she was a tenured associate professor of English and African-American studies at the University of South Carolina. She earned a bachelor’s degree in English from Barnard College and a doctoral degree in English from Emory University.

DR. KIMBERLY CHESTNUT

Dr. Kimberly Chestnutis the Director HEART Wellness Resource Center at Temple University. As the Director of HEART Wellness Resource Center, Kimberly works with departmental staff, colleagues, and students to guide the prevention and health education efforts throughout the University. Kimberly earned her doctorate in Human Sexuality in 2009 from Widener University, where she also completed a Master’s degree in Education. Prior to studying in education she earned a Master’s degree in Psychology from George Washington University in Industrial/Organizational Psychology. In summer 2011, she completed the Graduate Certificate in Diversity Leadership offered through Temple’s College of Education and IDEAL.

HILLARY BLECKER

Hillary Blecker has a decade of experience designing and facilitating participatory trainings on workplace and community issues from developing advocacy skills to creating safer workplaces. She has worked with unions, day labor worker centers, and health clinics. Three years ago, Hillary co-founded the Philadelphia Trainers’ Collaborative, which brings educators, organizers, and trainers together to share techniques and improve their ability to use education for transformation.

Hillary earned a bachelor’s degree in Public Health from Johns Hopkins University and a master’s degree in Public Health from the University of Washington. She currently works as the Training Coordinator at the Philadelphia Area Project on Occupational Safety and Health (PhilaPOSH).

DR. TIFFENIA D. ARCHIE

Dr. Tiffenia D. Archie presently serves as the Director of Faculty Recruitment and Retention in the Office of Institutional Diversity at Temple University (Philadelphia, PA) where her goal is to help the institution increase the number of women and minorities in the faculty.  Dr. Archie has worked in higher education for over 20 years, previously serving as the Assistant Academic Dean at Albright College. She also teaches courses in sociology, including Introduction to Sociology; American Ethnicity; Race and Racism; Race, Class, and Gender; and Statistics.

Dr. Archie is magna cum laude graduate of Albright College where she was a dual concentrator in Psychology and Sociology and earned her doctorate in Sociology at Temple University.  Her dissertation a dissertation entitled Women of Cover:  The Veil and the African-American Experience and employed a survey and face-to-face interviews.   She completed facilitator training with the National Coalition Building Institute (NCBI), attended the Management Development Program (MDP) at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education, and most recently earned a Certificate in Diversity Leadership at Temple.

Dr. Archie is involved in a number of professional organizations including the Association of Black Women in Higher Education (ABWHE) of which she is the President of the Philadelphia Chapter, the National Association for Multicultural Education (NAME), the Pennsylvania Association for Multicultural Education (PA-NAME), the National Association of Diversity Officers in Higher Education (NADOHE), and the Pennsylvania Association for Liaisons and Officers of Multicultural Affairs (PALOMA).  She was the 2010 recipient of the Outstanding Leader in Education Award, presented by the Association of Black Women in Higher Education.

Dr. Archie lectures on a number of topics, focusing on issues around race, class, and gender, including minority faculty, staff, and student recruitment and retention, racial micro-aggressions, and African-American Muslim women and veiling and has served as a dissertation consultant providing primarily methodological and statistical support.

DR. CARL S. MOORE

Dr. Carl S. Moorehas been speaking, facilitating and training in the higher education arena for over ten years. His passion for leadership, teaching & learning and social justice can be traced back to when he was an undergraduate at Kutztown University of PA. As a student leader Carl was a peer mentor, community assistant, orientation leader, Black Student Union President, and diversity educator. His enthusiasms for education lead him to The Ohio State University where he received Master's in Higher Education Student Affairs.

Currently he works at Temple University as the Associate Director of the Teaching and Learning Center. He worked as the Associate Director of the Fox School of Business Undergraduate Advising Center. Carl is a doctoral student in Temple’s Urban Education program. His research focuses on social justice, student development, organizational development, pop culture, and inclusive pedagogy in higher education. Carl’s professional progression thus far has allowed him to serve in the following roles: Student Support Services Advisor and Upward Bound Math Science Coordinator at Kutztown University, Coordinator of Multicultural Recruitment at Reading Area Community College, and as the Assistant Director of The Center for Social Justice and Multicultural Education at Temple University.

ALISON HUXTA

Alie Huxtahas been engaged in the political and cultural education of young people for the past 10 years in Philadelphia. After graduating from Temple University with a degree in Political Science, she worked in youth leadership development programs at Freire Charter School's PEACE Project, the University Community Collaborative of Philadelphia, and Camp Sojourner Girls Leadership Camp.

With a graduate certificate in Diversity Leadership from Temple's School of Urban Education, she now does diversity, difference, and multicultural awareness trainings at high schools and universities in Philadelphia and surrounding suburbs. Alie has co-facilitated several intergroup dialogues on race, class, and diversity throughout the Philadelphia region, including at the 15th Annual Conference of the Pennsylvania Association of the National Association for Multicultural Education, Elizabethtown College, Holy Family University, Arcadia University and Temple University.

She now currently works for the Center for Humanistic change in Lehigh and Northampton County School Districts, facilitating violence, drug, and bullying prevention programs and one-on-one mentoring with middle and high school students. She is presently enrolled in a Master’s program in Social Work at Bryn Mawr College.

DR. MARY STRICKER

Dr. Mary Stricker is an Associate Professor of Sociology (Teaching) and undergraduate advisor in the Sociology department at Temple University where she also received her Ph.D. in 2001. Her Ph.D. dissertation,A New Racial Ideology For The New Christian Right, analyzed racial reconciliation efforts in conservative Christian communities. The courses she teaches include History and Significance of Race in America, Racial and Ethnic Stratification, and The Social Construction of Race and Ethnicity. She received the ATTIC Distinguished Teaching Award in 2007. Mary has been co-facilitating and participating in Intergroup Dialogues since 2010. She believes these dialogues are a critical component in the struggle for racial justice.

WHAT IS TRANSFORMATIONAL INTERGROUP DIALOGUE?

Transformational Intergroup Dialogue draws from two well-known and successful models for promoting democratic dialogue, action and civic engagement in the context of diversity: (a) theMichigan Intergroup Relations Model (http://www.igr.umich.edu/), a process used by the University of Michigan and universities throughout the United States to promote intergroup dialogue and engagement in higher education and community settings; and (b)Transformational Social Therapy(TST), a process used internationally to promote knowledge sharing and collaborative action involving diverse parties in municipalities, civil society, educational settings, and other public arenas. Both models are informed by the theory and practice of multicultural citizenship and theory and research on learning and equitable social change in the context of diversity. TST’s grounding in depth psychology and critical social theory complements the Michigan Model by contributing a more robust understanding of the ways human needs and social structures interact and influence intergroup behavior.

Intergroup Dialogue

An intergroup dialogue is a facilitated learning approach that engages participants in exploring issues of identity, inequality and change through continuous, face-to-face meetings between people from two or more social identity groups that have a history of conflict or potential conflict. Intergroup dialogue is an innovative strategy to enhance participant’s awareness, knowledge and skills in relating to people who are different from them. Dialogues assist participants in enhancing their skills in the area of multicultural competency development, cross-cultural communications, problem solving, teamwork and collaboration.

There are a number of universities that conduct annual intergroup dialogues following the model of the University of Michigan, including the University of Maryland College Park, University of Washington, the University of Massachusetts at Amherst, Occidental College, Arizona State and Mount Holyoke College. Under this model, the aim is for participants to construct new meanings together, build alliances, and move to action. Intergroup dialogue differs from other diversity education programs because it focuses on both the cognitive and affective dimensions.

Two trained facilitators from varying identity groups facilitate the dialogue. The facilitators are trained in the following areas: self awareness, including awareness of their own social identity in the context of systems of domination/privilege and of oppression/exclusion; knowledge of the groups involved in the dialogue; group process; and community building.

Transformational Social Therapy

Charles Rojzman, a renowned French social psychologist, author, and international consultant, invented Transformational Social Therapy twenty years ago as a method for transforming institutions by helping people address the hatred and violence that separate them and prevent them from working together. The Charles Rojzman Institute has done extensive work in resolving intergroup violence and conflicts in France, Rwanda, Chechnya, and Israel. The main goal of TST, which begins with group dialogues and leads to transformative action, is to foster the practice and theory of healthy multicultural democracies by building relationships between individuals and groups.

TST is oriented to community problem-solving, particularly where groups are divided and problems appear intractable. The TST group building process allows participants to express their emotions, feel sufficiently safe to come into non-violent conflict, share information, and engage in transformative action on problems that affect them.

The transformation of violence into conflict is a key aspect of TST. Violence, defined as the denial of the humanity of the other, is a pathological accommodation to fears that arise from a confluence of societal, institutional, and personal factors. This kind of violence prevents people from living, working, and problem solving together and provides support for fear-based authoritarian and extremist perspectives. The group process enables participants to move from blaming others to taking collective responsibility for the problems they face.  The ability to come into conflict, without the usual “masks”, enables participants to take collective responsibility for the problems they face and put on the table what they know about particular issues or problems.