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"Pride and Progress"
Title: "Pride and Progress": Photography: Jack Ramsdale Artist: Ann Northrup Disclaimer

Discrimination/Harassment Resources

WHAT IS UNLAWFUL HARASSMENT?

    (Excerpt from http://www.eeoc.gov/laws/practices/harassment.cfm)

    Harassment is a form of employment discrimination that violates Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act of 1967, (ADEA), and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, (ADA).

    Harassment is unwelcome conduct that is based on race, color, religion, sex (including pregnancy), national origin, age (40 or older), disability or genetic information. Harassment becomes unlawful where 1) enduring the offensive conduct becomes a condition of continued employment, or 2) the conduct is severe or pervasive enough to create a work environment that a reasonable person would consider intimidating, hostile, or abusive. Anti-discrimination laws also prohibit harassment against individuals in retaliation for filing a discrimination charge, testifying, or participating in any way in an investigation, proceeding, or lawsuit under these laws; or opposing employment practices that they reasonably believe discriminate against individuals, in violation of these laws.

    Petty slights, annoyances, and isolated incidents (unless extremely serious) will not rise to the level of illegality. To be unlawful, the conduct must create a work environment that would be intimidating, hostile, or offensive to reasonable people.

    Offensive conduct may include, but is not limited to, offensive jokes, slurs, epithets or name calling, physical assaults or threats, intimidation, ridicule or mockery, insults or put-downs, offensive objects or pictures, and interference with work performance. Harassment can occur in a variety of circumstances, including, but not limited to, the following:

    • The harasser can be the victim's supervisor, a supervisor in another area, an agent of the employer, a co-worker, or a non-employee.
    • The victim does not have to be the person harassed, but can be anyone affected by the offensive conduct.
    • Unlawful harassment may occur without economic injury to, or discharge of, the victim.
    For a copy of EEOC's "Equal Employment Opportunity is THE LAW" poster , download here:

www.eeoc.gov/employers/poster.cfm.