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October: 2009 / Capital T is a monthly newsletter from Temple University Harrisburg (TUH) designed to share the events and news of Temple's involvement and activities in the capital region. | View this newsletter online

Kristin Federici Bowser

This edition of Capital T is in Memory of Kristin Federici Bowser

Kristin, a.k.a. the orginal KFed, was a 2008 MSW graduate at Temple University Harrisburg that died Saturday, October 3, 2009 in Harrisburg, PA as a result of an automobile accident at the age of 28. While at Temple, Kristin was active in the student alliance and advocated for students. Her concern for others and her genue willingness to help others was clear in all she did. She was the Program Director of Baby Love at Hamilton Health Center in Harrisburg. She was a licensed social worker in the state of Pennsylvania and was a member of the National Association of Social Workers. Kristin worked tirelessly for children and their families at Hamilton Health Center. Co-workers said she was in the process of starting a program to help children and their mothers. She also worked with the Safe Kids Coalition, and regularly attended the Dauphin County Diversity and Poverty Forums. Kristin was only 28 and doing amazing things for the community. She will be missed. Temple University Harrisburg faculty, staff, alumni and friends are in the process of establishing an award in memory of Kristin. This annual award would be given to a Temple University Harrisburg student who demonstrates service to the school and service to the profession of Social Work as Kristin did. Kristin had a strong passion for helping others. In the meantime if you are interested in contributing in Kristin's name, you may send donations to Temple University Harrisburg, 234 Strawberry Square, Harrisburg, PA 17101 (attn: Link Martin). Please specify that it is for Kristin's award and please inform anyone else that you think may want to know. In addition, Memorials may be made to Hamilton Health Center, c/o Kristin Federici Bowser Memorial Fund - Social Services Department, P.O. Box 5098, Harrisburg, PA 17110-0098.

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Announcing the first African American Studies course at Temple Harrisburg

The Department of African American Studies is working with Temple Harrisburg to offer Course 8432 African American Family for the spring 2010 semester. The African American Family course is a contemporary theories and research course on the African American family. This course includes assessment of family behavior, the role of children, sex roles, and perceptual changes within the context of society, demographic factors, impact of unemployment and underemployment, and income distribution of African American families. This course will be available to all students here at TUH and also to the community. The African American Family course will be taught by Temple University main campus African American Studies Department Chair, Nathaniel Norment, Jr., Ph.D. This course will be offered in a blended format with some online and in the class meetings. The course will be offered Tuesday evening's during the spring 2010 semester beginning at 6pm. TUH and the African American Studies department are excited to be working together on this new collaboration of course work at TUH.

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Fall New Field Instructor Training a Success!

Friday, September 25, 2009, TUH-SSW Field Education staff Tammy Carson-Sandman and Virginia Teter hosted the annual Fall New Field Instructor Training for 16 social workers who are so vital to the professional development of our social work students. Not only were there more participants than expected, but 75% of them were Temple MSW Alumni! Anecdotally, this year more than ever TUH-SSW, has seen a substantial number of alumni participating in the field instruction process. Nearly half of our field students are being supervised by Temple Alums, many of whom have graduated within the past five years. The field education staff is so thankful for this influx of Temple pride, and for the guidance and mentorship that these men and women are able to provide to our students. The NASW Code of Ethics indicates that we as professionals are charged to "socialize practitioners new to the field to social work's mission, values, ethical principles and ethical standards" (purpose 5), and that "social workers should contribute time and professional expertise to activities that promote respect for the value, integrity, and competence of the social work profession" including teaching (Standard 5.01(c)). The hope of the field education staff at TUH is that this trend toward alumni field instructors will continue with other recent Temple MSW graduates, that they too will want to give back to the profession by mentoring future MSWs.

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TUH Library working with the Philadelphia Office of Children & Family Services

The TUH Library just received 11 boxes of resources on child and family issues from the Philadelphia Office of Children & Family Services. We have added over 70 books to the TUH Library collection.

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TUH Social Work Book Student Book Club

Temple students, alumni, faculty and social workers from the Harrisburg area are invited to a Social Work Book Club and Social Work Information Night lead by Linda Grobman, the editor of The New Social Worker on Tuesday, November 17 at 8:00 PM. Two copies of the book club selection, Still Alice are available for loan at the TUH Library. Linda Grobman will present information about the resources that The New Social Worker provides for social workers at 8PM and the online chat will begin at 9:00 PM.

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NEST Assists HUD Grants Management

The NEST of TUH is working with the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to improve accountability and performance measurement for the several billion dollars awarded annually through HUD's discretionary and formula grants. The five year project is a subcontract in collaboration with The Center for Applied Management Practices, Inc. (CAMP) of Camp Hill, PA. The total project has a budget of approximately $1.4 million and the Temple Harrisburg NEST subcontract is approximately $72,000/yr. over each of the 5 years. Logic Models are now a requirement for most federal grant programs. HUD, however, is taking the Logic Model concept a quantum leap by distributing an interactive, expert system, on an Excel™ platform for creating the Logic Models. The Logic Models are submitted with grant applications and then quantitative data are extracted to a relational database for tracking the performance measures among thousands of grantees. The advantage of using a logic model format for capturing grantee data is that the logic model depicts each proposal's "theory of change" as well as the activities and outcomes projected and attained. The role of NEST is to (1) design the Excel-based expert systems, (2) configure the internet pathways for managing the flow of multi-way traffic between and among HUD offices and grantees, and (3) analyze the aggregate results of HUD funding. Spin-offs of this technology will be available in NEST trainings offered in the Central PA area during the year 2010. That is: Excel & Access Programming (including VBA), Website and FTP site Design, Planning with Logic Models, and Program Evaluation. Visit TempleNEST.org to find alerts about training and sign up for our newsletter for information about nonprofit agency support.

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MSW Student, Stephanie Rakoczy, recently published in the New Social Worker Magazine

Congratulations are in order for MSW student Stephanie Rakoczy. Stephanie was published in the New Social Worker Magazine for an article she wrote entitled Compassion Fatigue in Child Welfare. Continue reading for a segment from the article. "Imagine for a moment you are a police officer on a call in which violence is occurring. The people involved have been reported to have a history of drug use. On your way to this call, you are thinking about the potential dangers, including people who could currently be under the influence of a substance and physically harming others. You find out along the way that among the individuals included in this call are children on the scene who reside in this home. Upon your arrival on this scene, one of the individuals displays a weapon. Although this scenario doesn't always occur when you go into a situation, you have been trained and have the means to protect yourself. As a police officer, you are able to carry a gun and sometimes other weapons such as a taser gun and mace. Now imagine you arrive at this scene to discuss how this situation affects the safety of the children.

You have no weapon as you did as a police officer, yet the same safety concerns are present. If you have not yet guessed, you are not the police officer-you are a child welfare social worker."

To continue reading Stephanie's article go to: here

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Upcoming Events at Temple University Harrisburg:

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