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Courses

Tourism and Hospitality Management

These courses are also relevant to Sport and Recreation Management.

5111. Applied Research   (3 s.h.)

The course equips the student with an understanding of the process of pure and applied research and the scientific method, including an introduction to statistics and computer applications. It prepares the student to analyze critically the scientific literature of sport, recreation, tourism, hospitality, and leisure. The course addresses the major ways of conceptualizing and designing research, and acquiring, interpreting, and disseminating data. It focuses on applied research, with the expectation that the students will learn the practical application of research uses in the professional setting.

5212. Legal Issues in Sport and Recreation   (3 s.h.)

The course addresses the legal aspects of sport, recreation, and leisure services, with a focus on tort liability, human rights liability, criminal liability, and contractual liability. Legal concepts of negligence, situations which give rise to lawsuits, and principles of risk management are covered. Legal issues related to use of equipment, facility management, and accommodation for special populations are also addressed.

5216. Business Strategy in Sport and Recreation   (3 s.h.)

This course focuses on the strategic challenges confronting firms that compete in the global economy within the sport and recreation industry. It provides students a forum in which to apply and integrate business theories, practices, and skills in a global environment. The course examines opportunities for entrepreneurs in the industry through business plan development.

5220. Special Topics in Sport and Recreation   (3 s.h.)

This seminar is designed to provide an in-depth exploration of special topics, current issues, and trends in sport and recreation as they relate to topics such as interpretation of international multiculturalism; concepts of strategic management; the use of information technology and its impact on destinations; competitive strategy and marketing; environmental trends, planning, and development; policy formulation; and the social and economic impact of sport and recreation. Relevant industry problems and issues facing management and personnel in the related industries are discussed.

5221. Sport Governance and Policy   (3 s.h.)

The course addresses the various approaches to organizing and governing sport and athletic programs from school sports to professional sports, from individual conferences to international organizations. Principles, issues, and problem areas associated with the governance of individual athletic departments are addressed as well as the principles, issues, and problem areas associated with athletic conferences, and national and international governing bodies. Specific problems in relation to the size, structure, and staff of athletic departments and sport governing bodies are analyzed.

5222. Facility Management   (3 s.h.)

The principles of planning areas and facilities for sports, recreation, and parks are explored. In addition to the design and construction of specific sport and recreation facilities, approaches to standards and regional planning are discussed. Problems and issues related to funding, maintenance, and use of sport and recreation facilities are analyzed. The course also includes trends in facility design, construction, and maintenance.

5225. Sales and Development in Sport and Recreation   (3 s.h.)

The course analyzes and produces skills essential to revenue production and sales processes commonly found in the sport and recreation businesses. Sales and development theory, principles, current issues, and problem areas are addressed as they apply to all levels of programs and in all types of contexts. Experiential learning is infused into the content delivery.

5226. Consumer Behavior in Sport and Recreation   (3 s.h.)

 

This course is designed to provide knowledge of the psychological foundations of consumer behavior, the mechanisms of influence that are most likely to lead consumers to change their attitudes, their beliefs, and, most importantly, their actions, and how to engage these mechanisms in building persuasive communications. The focus of this class is the scientific research (of behavioral scientists from multiple disciplines) that illuminates the psychological processes underlying consumer behavior, with specific focus on spectator- and participant-based sport and recreation activities.

5312. Legal Issues in Tourism and Hospitality   (3 s.h.)

Discussion focuses on the legal implications of civil laws, areas of tort and contract, and the law and legal relationships that exist in the business context. Hospitality law, especially when dealing with customers and business contracts, is a major thread.

5314. e-Business for Tourism and Hospitality   (3 s.h.)

This course examines how and why electronic business and the internet have impacted the tourism, hospitality, and entertainment industries. It discusses the various business models that are used and highlights the successes and failures of those models. Topics include marketing, finance, strategy, and globalization with special emphasis on information technology and the dissemination of information.

5321. Advanced Data Analysis for Tourism and Hospitality Research   (3 s.h.)

This is the capstone course in the Data Analysis and Management track. It is application-oriented. Students apply tools such as exploratory data analysis, multivariate techniques, time series forecasting, management information systems, geographic information systems, etc. to aid decision making in tourism and hospitality. The course has two main goals: development of skills in the use of advanced data analysis techniques and the development of expertise in the interpretation and communication of their results.

5323. Tourism Development   (3 s.h.)

Based on the fundamental knowledge of tourism, this course focuses on the current issues facing the tourism industry that include the impact of information and technology on the tourism business, the ecological impact of the tourism business, diverse perspectives on tourism decision making processes, and other relevant marketing and managerial implications.

5324. International Tourism   (3 s.h.)

The importance and development of an international tourism market are discussed, along with the planning and development of an international tourism destination. Cultural tourism and ecotourism are included.

5325. The Gaming Industry   (3 s.h.)

The objectives of this course are to develop an understanding of the gaming industry. An examination of the evolution of the gaming industry is included to provide students with the background necessary to understand the potential that exists in the gaming industry today. Management considerations for casino operations within a casino hotel are covered.

5326. Consumer Behavior in Tourism and Hospitality   (3 s.h.)

Prerequisite:  Basic college-level statistical knowledge.

This course provides an overview of current knowledge about consumer behavior in the tourism/travel and hospitality businesses. It covers basic behavioral science and specific research tools, both qualitative and quantitative, used in marketing practice. Issues of consumer decision making, behavioral determinants, cultural influences, motivation, information search, and marketing implications are addressed. The course format includes lecture/discussion, student presentations, and a required term paper. The course is designed for graduate students who want to pursue managerial positions in consumer behavior/marketing research in the tourism or hospitality industries.

5327. Service Management in Tourism and Hospitality   (3 s.h.)

The objectives of this course are to improve the understanding of management in the service sector and to identify quality customer service. The service revolution, the competitive edge, service strategies, and service evaluation are discussed. Customer diversity related to providing high-quality service is emphasized.

5328. Tourism Economics   (3 s.h.)

This course utilizes an in-depth study of the asset theory of tourism, cost-benefit analysis, tax policy impacts, and other economical aspects of tourism.  It examines various research efforts designed as feasibility or marketing efforts aimed at tourism economics.

5332. Management Information Systems in Tourism and Hospitality   (3 s.h.)

This class examines the implication of information technology on the tourism and hospitality business and how to manage information technology resources within a company to maximize operation efficiency and productivity. Students learn to be information technology professionals in the industry who can manage, develop, and lead organizational information systems based on the integration of core business concepts and ever-changing knowledge about information and technology.

5333. Seminar for Information Technology in Tourism and Hospitality   (3 s.h.)

The final course in the Information Technology track is a case studies course. We examine technology and dot-com case studies in the tourism, hospitality, and entertainment industries. The case study methodology is covered so that students can conduct and write case studies. For a final project, each student writes a case study. It is intended that those case studies may be expanded into a Master's Thesis or Project that is required of students for degree completion.

5411. Management of Organizations   (3 s.h.)

The course addresses the basic functions of management as they pertain to the administration of organizations that function in primarily service industries like those represented by STHM. Management theory, principles, current issues, and problem areas are addressed as they apply to all levels of programs and in all types of organizations, including public, private, and voluntary.

5413. Financial Management   (3 s.h.)

The course analyzes managerial accounting and financial management, along with management strategies for financing ventures and expansion. Topics include accounting systems and internal control, financial statement analysis and interpretation, operational analysis, cost behavior, budgeting and forecasting, and pricing and feasibility analysis. Computer applications are highlighted.

5415. Service Marketing   (3 s.h.)

The marketing mix (promotions, public relations, sales, advertising, operations, pricing) as applied to various settings is analyzed, as well as marketing segmentation and targeting. The application of the principles specific to service marketing is a primary focus of the course, which employs case study methods in addition to traditional content delivery. Current issues and problem areas associated with marketing and public relations are analyzed.

5421. Event Management   (3 s.h.)

This experience-based course presents principles of event management, along with a broad overview of opportunities in the industry. Special focus is given to current trends and technology, risk management, staffing, and budgeting. A wide diversity of experiences is available.

5422. Entrepreneurship and Real Estate   (3 s.h.)

The class focuses on real estate issues in hospitality operations, and on the requirements and skills needed to become an entrepreneur in hospitality. As such, the real estate portion covers general principles of real estate ownership and management, but with a concentration on the unique aspects of hospitality real estate development and financing. Project feasibility analysis and sound underwriting criteria are a major focus of this section of the course. The entrepreneurship portion of the course focuses on requirements of owning and operating one's own business, including acquisition of capital, capital sources, and preparation of a complete business plan for a new venture.

5483. Readings and Conferences   (1-3 s.h.)

This course provides an opportunity for students to engage in extensive readings in the literature, under the direction of a faculty advisor, into topics not covered in other courses in the curriculum.  Students must present a written proposal to a faculty advisor explaining why they wish to engage in additional readings in the literature as a part of their graduate degree program. The student then meets periodically on an arranged basis with the faculty advisor to discuss the readings.

5485. Graduate Internship   (3-9 s.h.)

The Graduate Internship utilizes a field placement with emphasis on acquisition and application of practical skills. It requires 180 contact hours to take place in an agency, under supervision of both the University internship coordinator and the agency-designated supervisor.

9001. Research Seminar   (3 s.h.)

The scientific investigation of tourism and sport is explored through an investigation of the research literature.  This investigation identifies trends in the history of tourism and sport research through a critical analysis of the literature.  Methods, both classic and emerging, for data analysis in tourism and sport studies are discussed.  Opportunities and frontiers in tourism and sport research are explored.  The dissertation as a specific form of research is highlighted.  Challenges in the transition from student to faculty member are also discussed.

9002.  Seminar in Theory Development: Tourism and Sport Concepts   (3 s.h.)

The literature in tourism and sport management examines a broad spectrum of society and theoretical frameworks, and the theories that emerge are dynamic.  A theoretical framework is viewed as the systematic and detailed explanation that accounts for the how and the why, and has the ability to produce personal and public theories.  Personal theories are based on tacit knowledge and everyday experiences, while public theories are based on data and empiricism.  Public theories can be further classified in terms of their scope as either grand or middle-range theories.  Grand theories attempt to produce universal truths that operate irrespective of context, while middle-range theories are context specific.  Evaluating theoretical frameworks that produce theories is needed to guide researchers, practitioners, and policy makers.  The focus of this course is to conduct a review of theoretical frameworks with a specific focus on middle-range theories applicable for understanding conceptually distinct behaviors in tourism and sport management.  The examination of multiple frameworks uses a comparative analysis technique designed to assist in theory development and the evaluation of key theories and models in tourism and sport management.

9004. Seminar in Culture and Communication   (3 s.h.)

This course focuses on the study of culture and communication in the context of tourism and sport.  It draws on a growing body of cross-cultural research to examine ways in which cultural factors influence human behavior and communication, and interact in the development of such concepts as perception, identity, emotion, authenticity, interpretation, meaning, etc.  In what ways are we alike?  In what ways are we different?  Why?  The course explores world views, cultural values, relationships, communication theories and practices, and other topics in order to provide a context for understanding the differences in human behavior and communication and what those differences tell us about ourselves and others and, in particular, our experiences.  The understanding of culturally different human behavior and communication presents a global challenge to the tourism and sport industry in the 21st century.

9090. Special Topics in Tourism and Sport   (3 s.h.)

This seminar is designed to provide an in-depth exploration of special topics, current issues, and trends in tourism and sport as they relate to topics such as interpretation of international multiculturalism; concepts of strategic management; the use of information technology and its impact on destinations; competitive strategy and marketing; environmental trends, planning, and development; policy formulation; and the social and economic impact of tourism and sport.  Relevant industry problems and issues facing management and personnel in the related industries are discussed.

9482. Independent Study   (3 s.h.)

This course provides an opportunity for students to engage in systematic investigations, under the direction of a faculty advisor, into topics not covered in other courses in the curriculum.  Students must present a written proposal to a faculty advisor explaining why they wish to undertake an independent study course as a part of their graduate degree program.

9795. Master's Continuation   (1 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Completion of all other course requirements for the master's degree program.

This course is for master's candidates in the final stages of their program. It is taken by arrangement with the STHM advisor/coordinator. It satisfies the continuous registration requirement in the final semester.

9982. Independent Research   (2-12 s.h.)

This course provides an opportunity for students to engage in independent formal research, under the direction of a faculty advisor, into research questions that are not covered in other courses in the curriculum.  Students must present a written proposal to a faculty advisor explaining why they wish to conduct independent formal research as a part of their degree program.

9994. Preliminary Exam Preparation   (1 s.h.)

This course is designed for those doctoral students who have completed all of the prescribed courses, but have not completed their doctoral comprehensive exams. Students work with a doctoral advisor to develop a plan of study to prepare for the doctoral comprehensive exams.

9995. Master's Project   (3 s.h.)

Sessions are scheduled by arrangement with the Master's Project advisor. This course is limited to those who plan to earn the master's degree by completing a project.

9996. Master's Thesis   (3 s.h.)

Sessions are scheduled by arrangement with the Master's Thesis advisor. This course is limited to those who plan to complete the master's degree by writing a thesis.

9998. Pre-Dissertation Research   (1-3 s.h.)

This course is designed for those doctoral students who have completed their doctoral comprehensive exams but who have not completed their dissertation proposal. Students work with their assigned dissertation advisor to develop a plan of study leading to the approval of their dissertation proposal.


9999. Doctoral Dissertation   (1-9 s.h.)

This course is designed for those doctoral students who have completed their dissertation proposal.  Students work with their assigned dissertation advisor and their dissertation steering committee to conduct the study outlined in the dissertation proposal.  Students must remain registered for this course until the dissertation is approved by the examination committee at an oral defense, and the final copies of the dissertation are registered in the Graduate School.

 

Updated 10.26.09