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My interest in Reverse Engineering as a research topic began with the desire to somehow make sense of my life and how it was affected by the lives and deaths of numerous friends.   My intent was to Reverse Engineer faces and then build death mask upon these 3D scans.  Through out this project, I've done extensive technical research in order to get these face scans to a point that I could manipulate and work with the 3D digital data in a nurbs 3D Modeling program.   While also wanting to develop a visual language capable of expressing the inexpressible; I've done extensive research on masks, symbols and spiritual philosophies.  Through out these investigations I came to understand that the ideas I wanted to express were better realized through a variety of objects as opposed to simply death masks.  As I began creating these objects I also recognized that technically I really wasn't making death masks at all.  With this realization a door of opportunity opened and in a sense the objects that you see in the gallery that combine Reverse Engineering technology and these ideas are just the beginnings of several distinct areas of interest I now intend on pursuing.

These areas of pursuit are "Virtual Death Memorials" which utilize virtual reality technologies for fully interactive experiences with these objects, "Cremation Urns" which utilize rapid prototyping technologies for tangible output,  and "Holographic Mourning Masks" intended for future theatrical performances.   Each area of pursuit deals with issues of life and death intrinsic to the human condition none of us can escape.  I realize that there are no right or wrong answers when dealing with issues as profound as these; ultimately though, my intent for these endeavors is to bring some new understandings and perspectives to these age old human concerns.

 

 

 

 

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