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Program Overview

This document describes the MS in Computer Science, the MS in Information Science and Technology, and PHD Computer and Information Sciences Programs in the College of Science and Technology. To ensure all University, College, and Departmental requirements and procedures are adhered to, students must also consult the Temple University Graduate Bulletin, Graduate School Policy Manual, and Temple University Manual.


TABLE OF CONTENTS


ADMISSION INFORMATION

Admission Application Deadlines

Fall Semester: December 15th*  

Spring Semester: August 1st*

*Please note these deadlines are encouraged for Fall and Spring admissions. While we are able to accept applications after these on a rolling basis, in order to ensure review of your application for the semester you are requesting, it is advantageous to submit your materials as close to the deadline as possible.


If you have questions regarding the certification of your transcripts please contact Hailey King (Hailey.King@temple.edu).

In addition to your on-line application, you will need to mail the following:

a) Your statement of goals
b) Your resume
c) Three letters of recommendation (mailed, not electronic)
d) Your official transcripts and degree certificates directly from your graduating University in native language with English translation.

Your package should be addressed to:

 

Temple University

Department of Computer and Information Sciences: 035-10

313, Science & Education Research Center
1925 N. 12th Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122

 

Finally, you will also need to request your GRE and TOEFL scores to be sent from ETS directly to the Temple University Graduate School. The institution code for both the TOEFL and GRE is 2906; the Department Code for TOEFL is 78 and the Department Code for GRE is 0402.

 

Click Here To Learn More About Graduate Programs at Temple

 

CLICK TO APPLY (Domestic appicants)

 

CLICK TO APPLY (International applicants)


Minimal Admission Requirements: Master of Science in Computer Science

  • An undergraduate GPA of 3.0 on a 4.0 system.

  • The GRE examination is required. GRE scores of at least the 75th percentile on the quantitative section and at least the 25th percentile on the verbal section are expected. Most students submit scores far above the minimums in each of the Verbal and Quantitative sections. Minimum total score required on the new GRE: 300

  • Students from non-English speaking countries need a minimum TOEFL score of 85 to be accepted. The IELTS is accepted in lieu of the TOEFL and the minimum score is 7.

  • The PTE (Pearson Test of English) will be accepted in place of the TOEFL and IELTS. http://pearsonpte.com/TestMe/About/Pages/TestOverview.aspx The minimum acceptable score accepted is 53.

  • Minimum of 1 year of programming experience or 2 semesters of programming, AND 2 semesters of calculus.

 

Minimal Admission Requirements:  Master of Science in Information Science and Technology

To be admitted to the MS in IS&T Program (without additional course-work), students must normally meet the following admission standards:

  • An IS&T or CS baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution.

  • An undergraduate GPA of at least 3.0.

  • The GRE examination is required.GRE scores of at least the 75th percentile on the quantitative section and at least the 25th percentile on the verbal section are expected. Most students submit scores far above the minimums in each of the Verbal and Quantitative sections. Minimum total score required on the new GRE: 300

  • TOEFL scores for international 85. The IELTS is accepted in lieu of the TOEFL and the minimum score is 7. The PTE (Pearson Test of English) will be accepted in place of the TOEFL and IELTS. http://pearsonpte.com/TestMe/About/Pages/TestOverview.aspx The minimum score accepted is 53.


Minimal Admission Requirements: Doctor of Philosophy

  • Admission to the PHD program is given only to applicants with a Bachelor's or Master’s degree in Computer Science or Management Information Systems (or related field) from an accredited institution.

  • Minimum GRE Quantitative and Verbal (or equivalent GMAT) scores are 75th percentile or better. The quantitative scores must be in the 75th percentile or better. Minimum total score: 300

  • For students who received a a degree from a non-English speaking country, the minimum TOEFL score is 85 internet-based. The IELTS is accepted in lieu of the TOEFL and the minimum score is 7.

  • The PTE (Pearson Test of English) will be accepted in place of the TOEFL and IELTS. http://pearsonpte.com/TestMe/About/Pages/TestOverview.aspx The minimum acceptable score accepted is 53.

  • Acceptance by the CIS Graduate Faculty in at least one track is required. Applicants are encouraged to contact faculty members early on the the admissions process. For information about our faculty members' research interests click here.

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GENERAL INFORMATION

Financial Aid


Full-time graduate students are eligible for assistantships and a variety of fellowships. Awards are made on the basis of academic merit and position availabilities.

 

Most PHD students are funded via research and/or teaching assistantships. All admitted graduate students are encouraged to work with faculty for potential sponsorships.

 

A score of 45 or greater on the Test of Spoken English (TSE) or a score of 28 or greater on the TOEFL iBT Speaking Score is required for international applicants who wish to be considered for a Graduate Teaching Assistantship.

 

If you are applying for a Graduate Assistantship, please complete the following form:

      Graduate Assistantship Financial Application Form for PhD applicants

 

Transfer Credits

 

Toward the Master’s degree: A maximum of six credit hours earned in computer science or related areas at another university may be counted toward the MS degree.

 

Toward the PHD degree: After admission to the PHD program, advanced credit may be granted toward the PHD for work done at other institutions. The amount of credit granted will be determined by the CIS Graduate Committee and recommended to the Dean of the Graduate School but no more than 24 credits advanced standing will be awarded. Requests and decisions for advanced standing are normally not made until after the student has satisfactorily completed the CIS PHD Qualifying Examination and formed an Advisory Committee.


The following are College of Science and Technology regulations

  1. The credits must be obtained no more than five years prior to the student’s matriculation into the graduate program.

  2. Each of the credits has received a grade of “B” or better; and the “B” grades not exceed l/3 of the total number of credits transferred in.

  3. There be a rationale for applying these credits to the graduate program.

 

Requests for transfer credit must be initiated by the student and must be made in writing to the CIS Graduate Program Committee. No transfer credits will be allowed without the written permission of this committee; credit will not be given for coursework done elsewhere but repeated at Temple.

 

Graduate Student Grading Policy

 

  • A minimum cumulative GPA of 3.0 is required to graduate

  • A students who receives more than two grades below "B-" or more than one grade of "F" is dismissed for failure to maintain satisfactory grades.

  • To remain in Academic Good Standing with teh University, non-matriculated or matriculated students must achieve a semester GPA of 3.0 for each semester and maintain a culmulative GPA of 3.0 for all coursework complete at Temple University.

 

For addition details regarding Temple University's Grading Poicy for Graduate students click here.


Time and Campus of Courses

All courses in the MS and PHD programs will normally be given in the late afternoon or evening at the Main Campus.
Non-matriculation Policy: Upon approval of the CIS Graduate Program Director, students may be granted up to six credits for graduate courses taken at Temple University prior to admission to the degree program.


Graduation Application Procedures

There are three graduations: August, January, and May. The application is available on SSB (Self-Service Banner) at the very beginning of the semester you are graduating. You are encouraged to meet with the CIS Academic Program Coordinator for a Graduation Review.

 

Laboratory Facilities - ACM Student Chapter

Students are encouraged to join the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) Student Chapter at Temple. This is a major professional organization for Computer and Information Scientists.

 

ACCELERATED 4+1 BACHELORS/MASTERS DEGREE PROGRAM

 

The program is designed for high achieving Temple CIS undergraduate students who are interested in completing a Master of Science degree (CS or IST) in just one additional year of full-time study beyond their Bachelor’s degree.  The goal of the program is to allow such students to complete their undergraduate work more quickly  and encourage them to remain at Temple for their Master’s graduate work. 

 

Upon successful completion of the fourth year, students receive a Bachelors degree in the CIS Department.  At the end of the continuous fifth year, students receive a Master of Science degree (in CS or IST).    Qualified IS&T undergraduate students can complete an MS in IS&T degree  in five years. Qualified CS undergraduate students can complete an MS in either CS or IS&T in five years.  

 

The accelerated degree program consists of:

  • a minimum of 114 semester hours of undergraduate course work,

  • a maximum of 9 semester hours of graduate coursework to count towards both the undergraduate and the graduate degrees, and

  • a minimum of 21 semester hours of additional graduate coursework for the graduate degree. 

 

Students apply for admission to the ABMD program at the end of the Fall semester of their Junior year. To qualify for admission, applicants must have:

  • a cumulative GPA of 3.5,

  • completed the equivalent of 5 full semesters of study at Temple,

  • taken all their CIS major courses at Temple,

  • plan to have completed at least  99 undergraduate credits by the end of their Junior year.

 

In addition,  

  • Undergraduate CS students must have completed or be registered to complete CIS 3223 and CIS 3207 by the end of their Junior Year.

  • Undergraduate IST students must have completed or be registered to complete CIS 3309 by the end of their Junior Year.

 

Timeline

  • Fall of Junior Year:

    • Get a graduation review from CST advising after you have registered for your Spring courses (you may have to explain why you are asking so early).

    • By the end of the fall semester of Junior year, submit completed ABMD application.

  • Spring of Junior Year (after being admitted to the ABMD program):

    • see the MS/CS or MS/IST adviser) to register for the upcoming Fall semester.

  • Fall of your Senior year:

    • Take 1 graduate course (3 credits) and 9 credits undergraduate,

    • See the MS/CS or MS/IST adviser to register for the upcoming Spring semester.

    • Apply to the graduate school by November 1st Click here to apply

      • A complete Graduate School application (TOEFL and GREs are waived) must be on file with the Graduate School (including a fully paid fee) by November 1st of their senior year**.

  • Spring of your Senior year:

    • Take 2 graduate courses (6 credits) and 6 credits undergraduate.

    • Apply for UG graduation (after graduation, check to be sure that your status is changed in the registration system from undergraduate to graduate).

  • Summer before 5th year:

    • Take one graduate independent study (3 credits).

  • Fall of 5th year:

    • Take 3 graduate courses (9 credits)

  • Spring of 5th year:

    • Take 3 graduate courses (9 credits) then graduate with your Masters degree

 

Students admitted to the ABMD with Masters in CIS are expected to complete the entire program within four contiguous semesters beginning with the first semester of their Senior Year. Students are expected to maintain full-time study status during the last two semesters of undergraduate studies and the additional year of the Master’s program study.  No undergraduate overloads (more than seventeen credits) will be allowed. Please note, undergraduate students can take a maximum of 12 Graduate credits while classified as an undergraduate student.

 

**Students failing to complete the baccalaureate program of study with the required coursework or to maintain a 3.0 undergraduate grade point average or to earn at least B in each of the three graduate courses within the senior year will be de-enrolled from the program.  However, they may continue working toward the undergraduate degree and then apply for admission to the MS in CS or IS&T programs following the normal procedures of the Graduate School. 

 

 

If you have questions about the ABMD program, please contact the CIS department graduate adviser, sallyk@temple.edu.

 

To apply for the ABMD program click here.

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MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAM IN INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

 

The MS in IS&T program provides students with knowledge about current technology that can be used to solve business and engineering problems in a variety of application settings. Students will learn how to apply advanced software systems, networks, and database technologies to model and simulate real-world processes and data structures. Students will learn about process reengineering and how to design computerized systems to support these processes.

 

The MS in IS&T program emphasizes communication skills as well as problem analysis and problem solving. Graduates should be prepared for advancement in information science and technology careers such as, IT managers, application development project managers, business analysts, user-interface engineers, database managers, user-developer liaisons, administrators, security advisers, and consultants.

 

 

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MS  DEGREE IN INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

 

To earn an MS in Information Science and Technology, a student must complete ten (10) graduate courses (30 credits at the 5100-level and above). These courses include:

  • Four Core courses
    • CIS 5105 IT Process Management
    • CIS5106 System Development Process
    • CIS 5107 Computer Systems Security and Privacy
    • CIS 5108 Emerging Technologies and Tools for Enterprise Management]
  • Four Advanced topic (elective) courses
    • Students generally select electives from the list of MS IST electives (see below)
    • Students may select any M.S. Computer Science course, if they have the prerequsites (these courses typically require advanced programming and/or significant math skills such as linear algebra, Calculus II, statistics, etc). To view M.S. Computer Science courses, click here.
    • A maximum of three electives may be taken outside CIS with the approval of the MS in IS&T Program Director.
  • CIS 9991 Masters Project

     

 

Before a student can apply to the MS IST program, they must have completed:

  • 2 consecutive programming courses in the same language (such as CIS 1068 and 2168)

  • A database course (such as CIS 2109 and 4331)

  • A course in computer operating systems and networking (such as CIS 2229)

  • A course in component-based (object-oriented) software design (such as CIS 3309) including at least some introduction to client-server systems design.

 

This background may be satisfied by equivalent courses or relevant work experience. CLICK HERE to view a flow chart detailing the M.S. in Information Science & Technology prerequisites and program requirements.

 

At least 1 credit hour of work [or research] experience outside of Temple's CIS Department is required.  Students enroll in CIS 9182 or 9282 - Independent Study.  This requirement can be waived for students with adequate work experience.

 

COURSES OFFERED IN THE MS PROGRAM IN INFORMATION SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

 

Note: All courses are 3 semester hours.

 

CIS 5105 IT Process Management [typically offered in the fall]

CIS 5106 System Development Process [typically offered in the spring]

CIS 5107 Computer Systems Security and Privacy [typically offered in the fall]

CIS 5108 Emerging Technologies

CIS 5208 Knowledge Management

CIS 5210 Seminar in Information Science and Technology

CIS 5301 Advanced Database Management Systems

CIS 5303 Usability Engineering

CIS 5304 Network Technologies

CIS 5306 Software Engineering

CIS 5410 Advanced Seminar in Information Science and Technology

CIS 9182/9282 Independent Study (click here for registration form)

CIS 9991 Master's Project (click here for registration form)

 

 

MASTER OF SCIENCE PROGRAM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

The Master of Science in Computer Science emphasizes a general approach to the study of computing, including courses in artificial intelligence, operating systems, computer architecture, networking and communications, software engineering, graphics and image processing, data base systems, collaborative systems and theoretical areas. The curriculum is not oriented toward any specific applications area of computing, but emphasizes general graduate level studies in computing, preparing students for careers in systems analysis, teaching and research.


The MS program in Computer Science is an advanced degree intended to provide students with the knowledge and skills necessary to hold professional positions oriented toward the development and design of computer systems. Graduates with this degree would be able to seek employment as systems programmers for research organizations, computer centers, or for computer manufacturers.


Alternatively, graduates could become involved in the design and implementation of new applications software or the planning and evaluation of computer based systems. Prospective employers would include the government or industrial firms that utilize computers for research and/or production purposes.


The MS program also prepares students for further education in computer science. Graduates can pursue the PHD degree if they desire to teach at the college or university level or carry out academic or industrial research. It is also possible for students who obtain the MS degree in Computer and Information Sciences to teach in secondary schools (with the proper teacher certification) or community colleges.

 

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REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MS DEGREE IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

 

To earn an MS in Computer and Information Science, a student must complete ten graduate courses:

 

  • Three core courses:
    • CIS 5513 Automata and Formal Language
    • CIS 5511 Programming Techniques
    • CIS 5512 Operating Systems
  • One theory course:
    • CIS 9615 Design and Analysis of Algorithms
  • CS Electives
    • If students select the (3 credit) Project option, they must take five CS electives
    • If students select the (six credit) Thesis option, they take four CS electives
    • CS electives must be selected from the courses offered in the MS/PHD Program in Computer Science.  CS elective courses may also be selected from other departments upon approval of the CIS Graduate Committee. Students must take their core courses first before taking elective courses.
  • Project or Thesis

 

Before a student can apply to the MS CS program, they must have at least one year of programming (e.g. CIS 1068 abd CIS 2168 Data Structures) and one year of theoretical calculus (e.g. MATH 1041 or MATH 1042). If the student has insufficient undergraduate coursework in Computer Science, s/he will need to take undergraduate courses to address any deficiencies.  CLICK HERE to view a flow chart detailing the M.S. in Computer Science prerequisites and program requirements.

 

At least 1 credit hour of work [or research] experience outside of Temple's CIS Department is required.  Students enroll in CIS 9182 or 9282 - Independent Study.  This requirement can be waived for students with adequate work experience.

 

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COURSES OFFERED IN THE MS/PHD PROGRAM IN COMPUTER SCIENCE

      

Note: All courses are 3 semester hours. Please note the required prerequisite courses.

 

CIS 5511 Programming Techniques [prerequisites: CIS 2168 & 3223] - typically offered every semester
CIS 5512 Operating Systems [prerequisites: CIS 3207 & 3223] - typically offered in the fall

CIS 5513 Automata and Formal Languages [prerequisites: CIS 2166 & 3242] - typically offered in the fall

CIS 5516 Principles of Data Management [Prerequisites: CIS 5511 & 5512]

 CIS 5525 Neural Computation  [prerequisites: Stat 8003/8103 and undergraduate-level understanding of probability, statistics, and linear algebra]
CIS 5526 Machine Learning  [Prerequisites: Stat 8003/8103 and undergraduate-level understanding of probability, statistics, and linear algebra]
CIS 5527 Data Warehousing, Filtering and Mining [prerequisites: CIS 5511 and an undergraduate course in  databases]

CIS 5535 Probabilistic Graphical Models [prerequisites: CIS 2033 & 3223]

CIS 5538 Text Mining and Language Processing [prerequisite: CIS 2033]

CIS 5543 Computer Vision [prerequisites: CIS 2033 & 3219 & 3223]

CIS 5590 Topics in Computer Science [prerequisites: vary by topic]

CIS 5603 Artificial Intelligence [prerequisites: CIS 2166/Math 3098 & CIS 2168 & 2033]

CIS 5617 Computer Networking and Communications [Prerequisites: CIS 5511 & 5512]

CIS 5636 Ad Hoc Networks [prerequisites: CIS 3223 & 4319 & 4329]

CIS 5637 – Network & Information Security

CIS 5639 – Wireless Network and Communication

CIS 5642 Computer Architecture [prerequisites: CIS 2168 & 3207]

CIS 5644 Distributed Systems [prerequisites: CIS 2166 & 2168 & 8512]

CIS 9182/9282 Independent Study (click here for registration form)

CIS 9190 Seminar in Computer and Information Science

CIS 9590 Seminar in Advanced Topics in Computer Science [permission of instructor]

CIS 9601 Computer Graphics and Image Processing [Prerequisite: CIS 5511]
CIS 9602 User Interface Design and Systems Integration [Prerequisite: CIS 5511]
CIS 9615 Design and Analysis of Algorithms [Prerequisites: CIS 5511 & 5513 - typically offered in the Spring]

CIS 9618 Web Applications Development [Prerequisites: CIS 5511 & 5512]
CIS 9651 Artificial Intelligence, Heuristic Models, and Education [Prerequisite: CIS 5603]
CIS 9664 Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining

[Prerequisites: Basic knowledge in Data Base Systems (CIS 5516); programming skills; basic statistics, graph theory, & linear algebra]

CIS 9665 Advanced Topics in Data Base Systems [Prerequisite: CIS 5516]
CIS 9666 Advanced Networking and Client-Server Computing [Prerequisite: CIS 5617]
CIS 9668 Design & Development of E-Commerce Systems [Prerequisite: CIS 9618]
CIS 9669 Distributed and Parallel Computer Systems [Prerequisite: CIS 5617]

 

PhD Only

CIS 9994 Preliminary Exam Preparation

CIS 9998 Pre-Dissertation Research

CIS 9999 Dissertation Research

 

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PHD PROGRAM

The Computer and Information Sciences PHD program prepares a student to undertake independent research in either an academic or non-academic setting. The program is structured around the PHD thesis; course and seminar work are designed with the requisite quality of the thesis in mind. A criterion for the thesis is that it be publishable in a recognized journal.

 

NOTE: All CIS graduate students accepted into the Ph.D. program are expected to successfully complete the program. Transfer to one of the MS degree programs is not permitted except under extraordinary circumstances.


SUMMARY OF COURSE REQUIREMENTS FOR THE PHD DEGREE IN COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCES

  • Students must take 16 courses from among those approved for their track.

  • No more than 8 of the 16 courses may be independent study 9182/9282, preliminary exam prep 9994, or pre-dissertation research 9998.

  • Graduate credits from other institutions can be considered for transfer credits.

  • Requirements to Waive Examination on a course that is part of the Qualifier Exam:

    • Course must be taken at Temple University;

    • Student must have received an A or A-;

    • Student must have completed the course within four (4) years of admission to the doctoral program.

  • At least 1 credit hour of work [or research] experience outside of Temple's CIS Department is required.  Students enroll in CIS 9182 or 9282 - Independent Study.  This requirement can be waived for students with adequate work experience.

  • The final dissertation should follow the formatting guidelines outlined in the Dissertation & Thesis Handbook

 

The four research tracks for the Ph.D. are:


1. Artificial Intelligence and Applications (AI) -- concerned with systems that exhibit intelligent behavior.

2. Computer and Network Systems (NS) -- concerned with computer systems, networking and high performance computing.

3. Information Systems (IS) -- concerned with systems that provide information to improve the performance of organizations.

4. Software Systems (SS) -- concerned with the creation of software and the associated methodologies.

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COMPUTER AND INFORMATION SCIENCES PHD TRACK REQUIREMENTS

 

Students are required to take at least 16 courses (48 credits) at least 8 of which must be among those approved. Remaining courses can be Independent Study (CIS 9182 or CIS 9282), Preliminary Exam Prep (CIS 9994), or Pre-Dissertation Research (CIS 9998).

 

 

Artificial Intelligence (Track Chair: Dr. Longin Jan Latecki)

- Three required CIS courses (the three courses are also required for Qualifying Exam):

CIS 5511 Programming Techniques,

CIS 5526 Machine Learning,

CIS 5603 Atificial Intelligence;

- At least five CIS courses (choose at most four for inclusion in Qualifying Exam):

CIS 5513 Automata and Formal Languages,

CIS 5525 Neural Computation,

CIS 5527 Data Warehousing, Filtering and Mining,

CIS 5538 Text Mining and Language Processing,

CIS 5543 Computer Vision,

CIS 9601 Computer Graphics and Image Processing,

CIS 9615 Design and Analysis of Algorithms,

CIS 5617 Computer Networking and Communication,

CIS 9618 Principles of Software Engineering,

CIS 9651 Artificial Intelligence, Heuristic Models, and Education,

CIS 9664 Knowledge Discovery & Data Mining,

CIS 9665 Advanced Topics in Data Base Systems,

CIS 9590 Advanced Topics in Computer Science

 

Computer and Network Systems ( Track Chair: Dr. Jie Wu)

- Core Courses (choose at least two for inclusion in Qualifying Exam):

CIS 5511 Programming Techniques

CIS 5512 Operating Systems

CIS 5513 Automata and Formal Languages

CIS 5542 Computer Architecture

CIS 5617 Computer Networking and Communication

- Didactic Courses (choose at most five for inclusion in Qualifying Exam):

CIS 5526 Machine Learning

CIS 5536 Ad Hoc Networks

CIS 5537 Network and Information Security

CIS 5539 Wireless Network and Communication

CIS 5854 Distributed Computing

CIS 5603 Artificial Intelligence

CIS 9615 Design and Analysis of Algorithms

CIS 5516 Principles of Data Management

CIS 9618 Principles of Software Engineering

CIS 9664 Knowledge Discovery and Data Mining

CIS 9665 Advanced Topics in Data Base Systems

CIS 9666 Advanced Networks and Client-Server Computing,

CIS 9669 Parallel Processing.


Information Systems
(Track Chair: Dr. Zoran Obradovic)

- At least one and up to three theory area topics:

CIS 5511 Programming Techniques,

CIS 9615 Design & Analysis of Algorithms,

Stat 8003 Statistical Methods I;

- At least one and up to three systems area topics:

CIS 5512 Operating Systems,

CIS 5516 Principles of Data Management,

CIS 5617 Computer Networking and Communication,

CIS 5644 Distributed Systems

CIS 9666 Advanced Networks and Client-Server Computing;

- At least two and up to four IS Track Specific areas:

CIS 5525 Neural Computation,

CIS 5526 Machine Learning,

CIS 5527 Data Warehousing, Filtering and Mining,

CIS 5603 Artificial Intelligence,

CIS 9618 Principles of Software Engineering,

CIS 9664 Knowledge Discovery & Data Mining,

CIS 9665 Advanced Topics in Data Base Systems,

CIS 9668 Design & Development of E-Commerce Systems,

CIS 9590 Advanced Topics in Computer Science.


Software Systems
(Track Chair: Dr. Justin Shi)

- Core courses (all are required for Qualifying exam):

CIS 5513 Automata & Formal Languages,

CIS 5511 Programming Techniques,

CIS 5512 Operating Systems,

CIS 9615 Design & Analysis of Algorithms,

CIS 5516 Principles of Data Management,

CIS 5617 Computer Networking & Communication,

CIS 9618 Principles Software Engineering;

 

 

DOCTORAL EXAMINATIONS/CULMINATING EXPERIENCES

Doctoral Examinations/Culminating Experiences require a minimum of 6 s.h., with at least 2 s.h. of the 6 s.h. required to be in course number 9999. The remaining 4 s.h. can be a combination of the following course numbers: 9994, 9998, and/or 9999. Departments may require additional semester hours to fulfill Doctoral Examinations/Culminating Experiences since 6 s.h. constitute the minimum requirement. Doctoral students must maintain continuous enrollment from matriculation to graduation.

 

A doctoral student who has completed all coursework for the degree, but has not passed the preliminary examination, must register each Fall and Spring semester for 1 s.h. of course number 9994, “Preliminary Examination Preparation.” Students must be registered for 9994 in the semester in which the examination is taken, including the Summer session. A student who is required to retake the preliminary examination in whole or in part must re-register for 1 s.h. of 9994 in the semester in which the examination is retaken.

 

A student who has passed the Prelim I, but not the Prelim II register each Fall and Spring for course number 9998, “Pre-Dissertation Research.” Students must be registered for 9998 in the semester in which the Prelim II examination is taken, including the Summer session.

 

A doctoral student must complete 2 s.h. of course number 9999, "Dissertation Research," after Elevation to Candidacy. Students must be registered for 9999 in the semester in which they defend their doctoral dissertation. Students regularly refer to the Gradaute Dissertation & Thesis Handbook when completing their dissertation.

 

Students who wish to enroll in Indepdent Study (CIS9182 or 9282), Preliminary Exam Prep (9994), Predissertation Research (9998), or Dissertation Research (9999) must have their course registration processed by the CIS Administrative Coordinator. Please complete the Special Course Registration Form and return it to Hailey King, Administrative Coordinator, in 313 SERC.

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THE PHD QUALIFIER EXAMINATION

This exam tests the student on the fundamentals of computer and information sciences and the basic body of knowledge in a track. It consists of a written closed book exam on theory and algorithms, systems, and track specific material. The Qualifying Exam is given every Spring semester (usually late January) and every Summer (usually late June). The exam consists of seven written questions. [Note: Questions on individual courses may be waived if the student has taken the course at Temple University within four years of admission to the doctoral program and received a grade of A or A- in that course.]

 

The Qualifier Requirements by Track:

  1. Artificial Intelligence

    - three required CIS courses (the three courses are also required for Qualifying Exam):

    CIS 5511 Programming Techniques,

    CIS 5526 Machine Learning,

    CIS 5603 Artificial Intelligence;

    - at least five CIS courses (choose at most four for inclusion in Qualifying Exam)

  2. Computer and Network Systems

    — at least two Core courses:  CIS 5511, 5512, 5513, 5542, 5617

    — at most five Didactic courses:  CIS 5526, 5536, 5537, 5539, 5544, 5603, 9615, 5516 (9616), 9618, 9664, 9665, 9666, 9669.

  3. Information Systems

    — at least one and up to three Theory/Algorithms courses: CIS 5511, 9615 , Stat 8003
    — at least one and up to four Systems courses: CIS 5512, 5516, 5617, 5644, 9666
    — at least two and up to four Track Specific courses: CIS 5525, 5526, 5527, 5603, 9618, 9664, 9665, 9668, 9590.

  4. Software Systems

    — three Theory/Algorithms courses: CIS 5513, 5511, 9615
    — three Systems courses: CIS 5512, CIS 5516, CIS 5617
    — one Track Specific course: CIS 9618.


The seven courses on which a student’s qualifier examination will be based must be approved in writing by the student’s Advisor and Track Chair.

 

The exam may be retaken only once (either in full or in part), normally within one year of the first attempt, and only with the permission of the Graduate Committee. The Committee may, at its discretion, recommend a passing grade for a student conditional upon the satisfactory completion of a list of courses prescribed by the Committee for the purpose of remedying specific deficiencies.

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TEACHING REQUIREMENTS

As part of the normal graduate training program, all PHD candidates are expected to teach at least one course. Exception may be granted by the CIS Graduate Program Committee in consultation with the student’s Advisory Committee.

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ADVISORY COMMMITTEE

Once students have passed the Qualifying Examination, they are expected during that same semester to choose the area in which they plan to do their research and to find an advisor willing to supervise them. The student and advisor should formulate a Plan of Study to complete the coursework requirements for the PHD degree.


The advisor and the student will then select at least two additional graduate faculty members for the Advisory Committee. The Advisory Committee must contain at least one other member of the CIS Department (in addition to the advisor) and it must be approved by the Graduate Program Committee.


The student’s Plan of Study must be approved by this Advisory Committee and the Graduate Program Committee, normally before the end of the semester in which the Qualifier Examination is passed. The Advisory Committee administers the Preliminary Examinations.

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PRELIMINARY EXAMINATIONS (ADVISORY COMMITTEE)

The goal of the prelims is to test the research skills and knowledge of the student and the appropriateness and feasibility of the proposed research.


The prelims focus on:
1. Testing advanced track knowledge
2. Testing in-depth knowledge in the selected research area
3. Ensuring that the selected research problem is of reasonable scope and significance
4. Ensuring that the proposed dissertation is feasible


The Prelims are completed in two stages.


Prelim I
will include at least items 1 and 2.

Prelim I consists of written and oral components testing advanced track knowledge and in-depth knowledge of the research area and includes a literature review of the area. In conjunction with items 1 and 2 Prelim I will also be used to determine whether the student needs to take additional courses in order to support research in the chosen area. Prelim I is open only to the committee and to members of the department.

 

Students must be registered for at least 1 credit of CIS 9994 Preliminary Exam Preparation in the semester in which the examination is taken


Prelim II will include at least items 3 and 4.

Prelim II consists of written and oral components to assess the appropriateness of the research including the approach and methodology. The written portion of Prelim II should be of sufficient quality to be publishable as a department technical report. This exam is open to the public.

 

Students must be registered for at least 1 credit of CIS 9998 Predissertation Researchin the semester in which the examination is taken

 

Both Prelim I and II must be scheduled, and all relevant information(i.e. date, time, abstract, dissertation) made available, at least four weeks in advance. To schedule an exam, students should contact the CIS Administrative Coordinator.

 

The successful completion of Prelim II will produce a written understanding among the student, faculty advisor, and dissertation committee, specifying the work to be done to obtain final approval of the dissertation.


After passing both parts of the Preliminary Exam, students are admitted to PHD candidacy and begin work on their thesis under the direction of their Advisory Committee. Students must enroll for at least two credits of CIS 9999 Dissertation Research. The thesis should be prepared according to the requirements of the Graduate School. Please refer to the Dissertation & Thesis Handbook for further direction.

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DISSERTATION DEFENSE

EXAMINING COMMITTEE – Evaluates the student’s dissertation and oral defense. This committee is comprised of the Doctoral Advising Committee and at least one additional Graduate Faculty member from outside the CIS Department. This Outside Examiner should be identified no later than the beginning of the semester in which the student will defend the dissertation. The chair of the Examining Committee should not be the student’s PHD advisor.


The student must complete the writing of the dissertation and submit it to the committee at least four weeks prior to the scheduled oral defense. The student defends his research at this time; discussing the major contributions and its significance to the field. The advisor must schedule the defense with the CIS Administrative Coordinator. This exam is advertised through the Graduate School, as well as the department, and is open to the public.

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TIME-LINE

A full-time student (with the Master’s Degree) will normally be expected to complete all requirements for the PHD within three to four years. Many PHD students will be working 20 hours per week as Teaching Assistants. Thus, under normal circumstances each student will be supported for up to four years beyond the Master’s degree. The proposed time line is as follows:

1. Qualifier

Normally taken the first time it is offered after admission to the PHD program (usually January).

2. Writing Skills

Show evidence by end of semester qualifier is passed (must be passed before Prelim II scheduled).

3. Advisory Committee

Select dissertation advisor and form Advisory Committee by end of semester qualifier is passed.

4. Prelim I (Advisory Committee)

Within 1 year after passing Qualifier.

5. Prelim II (Advisory Committee)

Within 1 year after Prelim I is passed.

6. Dissertation Defense (Examining Committee)

Within 1 year after Prelim II is passed.


Sample Time line for student starting in Fall Semester

Year 1
Three courses per semester
Show evidence of writing skills
Spring Semester: Take Qualifying Exam, form Advisory Committee


Year 2
Fall Semester: Additional courses (chosen in conjunction with committee) plus begin research on dissertation topic.
Spring Semester: Literature search, formulate research problem, take Preliminary I Exam.


Year 3
Fall semester: Dissertation research
Spring Semester: Take Preliminary II Examination


Year 4
Dissertation Defense

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GUIDELINES FOR CIS PHD PROGRESS

1. A student is admitted to the CIS PHD program only via admission to one of four areas. It is important that the student work closely with faculty in this area and carefully follow the guidelines for preparing for the specific area Qualifying Exam.


2. The Qualifying Exam should normally be taken the first year of PHD studies. It is currently given the first week of the Spring Semester. This exam measures breadth of CIS knowledge, especially in the core subject areas. Students who fail the first time are allowed to re-take it once. Failing this exam a second time means automatic dismissal from the program.


3. As part of preparing for PHD work, the student must demonstrate, by the end of the Semester in which the Qualifying Exam is passed, a sufficient level of writing skills has been achieved.


4. In the same Semester in which the Qualifying Exam is passed the student is expected to choose an adviser and , in consultation with the adviser, form a Doctoral Advisory committee. It is critical that this be done as soon as possible since the committee is responsible for recommending specific courses that will aid in the student’s research. [For the PHD, students are required to take a minimum of 21 credits beyond the 30-credit Masters degree.]


5. The Doctoral Advisory Committee must include at least three graduate faculty members from Temple University; two of which, including the chair, must be from the student’s program.


6. Each Doctoral Advisory Committee will meet at least once a year to review the advisee’s progress and make suggestions concerning future research. A written record of this meeting, including the findings of the committee and suggestions made, must be placed in the student’s file. A copy must be given to the student.


7. The adequacy of the student’s in-depth preparation and research objectives are examined in the first of two Preliminary Exams taken in preparation for dissertation research. The second of the two Preliminary Exams focuses on the student’s research proposal.


8. Timing is everything! It is critical that each member of the Doctoral Advisory Committee has adequate time to read the material being presented at Preliminary Exams I and II. Therefore, the Preliminary I and II Exams must be scheduled a MINIMUM of three weeks AFTER approval from the graduate committee. [Approval is requested by the major advisor sending the appropriate documentation to the Graduate Committee Chair. The approval process normally takes a week.]


9. The oral defense of the dissertation is administered by the Dissertation Examining Committee. The Dissertation Examining Committee consists of the Doctoral Advisory Committee and at least one faculty member not from the student’s program. This Outside Examiner should be identified no later than the beginning of the semester in which the student will defend the dissertation. The chair of the Examining Committee should not be the student’s PHD advisor.


10. For the oral defense, the student’s Dissertation Examining Committee needs a month to read the final dissertation, especially since there will be one, or possibly more, new members. Thus, students should allow AT LEAST a month after approval of the graduate committee for scheduling the final defense.


11. Students have up to seven years to finish their PHD from the date they begin the program. If more time is needed it is currently possible to request an additional three years [one year at a time] without major difficulty as long as the student is making “reasonable progress.” However, obtaining an extension of time beyond (a total of) 10 years is VERY difficult and should be avoided!


12. Students who no longer are receiving support from the University and who are official PHD candidates [having passed Prelim II in our program] can apply for a one-time Dissertation Completion Grant. Students receiving such awards are not allowed to receive University funding again.

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OTHER REQUIREMENTS AND POLICIES

In general, students must satisfy the requirements of the CIS Department, the College of Science and Technology, and the Graduate School.

These currently include the following:


a. Students must register EVERY SEMESTER and must complete the program within seven years from the date of admission, unless permission is given by the Dean of the Graduate School;

 

b. Students must have a 3.0 (or “B”) average and no incomplete courses at the time of graduation;


c. Students may not receive more than two grades of less than “B-”.

Language Requirement
: There is no University or CIS Department language requirement for the PHD degree.


Courses from Other Disciplines: There is no limit on the number of credits earned from other Temple departments. However, such courses must be approved by the Graduate Program Committee in consultation with the student’s Advisory Committee.

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