Faculty News Roundup
Compiled by Rich Grippaldi, Ph.D. Candidate.


Beth Bailey, Professor of History, is on a National Endowment for the Humanities research leave this year. She is working on a cultural/social history of recruiting the all-volunteer U.S. Army. Bailey presented material from this project at the American Historical Association meeting in January. She also discussed her project in April at a Temple CENFAD colloquium and at the Modern America seminar at Princeton.


Jay Lockenour, Associate Professor of History, presented some of the preliminary results of his research on Erich Ludendorff at the CENFAD symposium series on January 26. In “Erich Ludendorff and the Origins of Total War,” Lockenour argued that despite his personal isolation from the corridors of power in the Nazi regime, Ludendorff’s thinking on military mobilization and propaganda profoundly influenced German war- and decision-making. Dr. Lockenour also provided commentary at a conference on “The Future of Transatlantic Security Relations” held March 8 at the Bush School for Public Policy at Texas A&M University.


Gregory J. W. Urwin, Professor of History and CENFAD Associate Director, published “’Through Fields of Blood . . . until Tyranny is Trodden under Foot’: Joseph Warren’s Last Oration, March 6, 1775,” in the spring 2006 issue of Military Chronicles: The Magazine of Warfare & History. He also serves as one of the magazine’s associate editors.

Urwin pulled double duty at the American Historical Association’s 120th Annual Meeting in Philadelphia last January. He presided over a session that the Organization of History Teachers devoted to discussing his book, Black Flag over Dixie: Racial Atrocities and Reprisals in the Civil War. Urwin also chaired and commented on a session titled “Old Reconstructeds: Southern Memory and the Civil War.”

Urwin spoke about “Getting to the ‘Real War’: Racial Atrocities, Reprisals, and the Civil War” at the Black Flag over Dixie Symposium sponsored by Middle Tennessee State University in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, in February. A few weeks later, he gave an expanded version of that paper for the CENFAD Colloquium in the Russell F. Weigley Seminar Room. Urwin has just been invited to deliver a lecture in the “Perspectives in Military History” series at the U.S. Army War College next November.

During the past year, Urwin published book reviews in On Point: The Journal of Army History, Civil War Book Review, Military Collector & Historian: Journal of the Company of Military Historians, North & South: Official Magazine of the Civil War Society, Arkansas Historical Quarterly, Southern Campaigns of the American Revolution, and Military Chronicles.


Elizabeth Varon, Professor of History, helped to organize a faculty forum in the Center for the Humanities, called Civil War and Emancipation Studies at Temple. CWEST sponsored a very successful conference in February on African Americans in Civil War Philadelphia, featuring comments by Temple alum Jim Paradis and by our own Professor Gregory Urwin. Professor Varon is thrilled to report that the state of Virginia just erected a highway marker honoring Union spy Elizabeth Van Lew at the site of Van Lew's home in Richmond; Varon, as Van Lew's biographer, was the featured speaker at the April 3 unveiling of the marker. Varon is working now on a book on Civil War causality for University of North Carolina Press.