McKevitt, Grippaldi, and Klinek Win Awards at Barnes Club Conference
by Rich Grippaldi, Ph.D. Candidate.

Three of Temple’s own – Ph.D. student Andrew McKevitt, Ph. D. candidate Richard Grippaldi, and Ph.D. student Eric Klinek – won awards for papers presented at the Eleventh Annual James A. Barnes Club Conference held in Philadelphia on April 1, 2006.

McKevitt’s paper, “’You Are Not Alone!’: Anime and the Globalizing of American Culture,” won the James A. Barnes Club Award in American History. “’You Are Not Alone!’” explores how American fans of Japanese animation, or anime, transcended the confrontational U.S.-Soviet Cold War framework by building local, national, and international communities around one of the most notable cultural products of recent globalization.

Grippaldi’s paper, “’The Best Appointments Should Be Made’: The Officers of the U.S. Regiment of Dragoons and Military Professionalism,” won the Russell F. Weigley Award in Military History. “’The Best Appointments Should Be Made’” discusses differing views of military professionalism in Jacksonian society by examining the officers of the Regiment of Dragoons, a new cavalry unit created in 1833 whose officers came from both the regular army and from a mounted volunteer unit patrolling Indian lands.

“I’m pleased to win the Weigley prize,” Grippaldi said, “but I had some stiff competition. I would not have been surprised if someone else had walked away with the award. The fierce competition is a tribute to Dr. Weigley’s legacy and demonstrates the quality of military history produced by graduate students at Temple.”

Eric Klinek won a special second place certificate, as well as three military history books, in the competition for the Russell F. Weigley Award. Klinek’s paper, “The Army’s Orphans: The United States Army Replacement System during World War II and Its Impact on Combat Effectiveness,” challenges recent revisionist scholarship emanating from Ohio State University that has attempted to vindicate the performance of the U.S. Army in the European Theater of Operations during World War II. While Klinek acknowledges that some American divisions successfully integrated their replacements and prepared them for combat, he criticizes the army’s overall performance.

The Russell F. Weigley Award is presented annually at the Barnes Club Conference by the U. S. Army Heritage Center Foundation. It honors one of America’s greatest military historians. At the time of his death, Weigley was Distinguished University Professor Emeritus of American History at Temple. Grippaldi is the first Temple student to win this award.

All three students earned their respective awards after panels comprised of Temple University faculty and students and, in the case of the Weigley prize, the executive director of the U. S. Army Heritage Center Foundation, evaluated the papers in each category and voted for the respective winners. Both Grippaldi and Klinek will have their papers published on the Army Heritage Center Foundation web site at http://www.armyheritage.org/education/post/.