Rethinking Force and Diplomacy – A Select Bibliography

Compiled by John Oram
Stacks Manager
Paley Library
Temple University

The following books are merely a sample of recent works that push the boundaries of how scholars conceptualize “force and diplomacy.” It is neither exhaustive nor authoritative. All of these works are available in Paley Library (library.temple.edu).



1. Jacqueline Best, The Limits of Transparency: Ambiguity and the History of International Finance. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2005.

2. Rachel Brett, Young Soldiers: Why They Choose to Fight. Boulder. Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2004.

3. Mark Cameron Edberg, El Narcotraficante: Narcocorridos and the Construction of a Cultural Persona on the U.S.-Mexico Border. Austin: University of Texas Press, 2004.

4. Wilson P. Dizard, Inventing Public Diplomacy: the Story of the U.S. Information Agency. Boulder: Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2004.

5. Jude L. Fernando, Children's Rights : Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science v. 575. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications, 2001.

6. Marcus F. Franda, China and India Online: Information Technology, Politics, and Diplomacy in the World's Two Largest Nations. Lanham: Rowman & Littlefield, 2002.

7. Ann Hironaka, Neverending Wars: the International Community, Weak States, and the Perpetuation of Civil War. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 2005.

8. Peter S. Kindsvatter, American Soldiers: Ground Combat in the World Wars, Korea, and Vietnam. Lawrence: University Press of Kansas, 2003.

9. Maja Kirilova Eriksson, Reproductive Freedom : In the Context of International Human Rights and Humanitarian Law. The Hague: M. Nijhoff, 2000.

10. Roger Levermore and Adrian Budd eds., Sport and International Relations: an Emerging Relationship. London: Routledge, 2004.

11. Michael Mann, The Dark Side of Democracy: Explaining Ethnic Cleansing. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2005.

12. The Fog of War: Eleven Lessons from the Life of Robert S. McNamara. Dir. Errol Morris. Columbia TriStar Home Entertainment, 2004.

13. President's Council on Bioethics, Beyond Therapy: Biotechnology and the Pursuit of Happiness/ a report of the President's Council on Bioethics. New York: Dana Press, 2003.

14. Jane Schneider and Ida Susser, Wounded Cities: Destruction and Reconstruction in a Globalized World. New York: Berg, 2003.

15. Richard P. Tucker and Edmund Russell, Natural Enemy, Natural Ally: Toward an Environmental History of Warfare. Corvallis: Oregon State University Press, 2004.

Carol Elaine Anderson, Eyes Off the Prize: The United Nations and the African American Struggle for Human Rights, 1944-1955. New York: Cambridge University Press, 2003.

Jean K. Chalaby ed., Transnational Television Worldwide: Towards a New Media Order. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2005.

Guilhem Fabre, Criminal Prosperity: Drug Trafficking, Money Laundering and Financial Crises after the Cold War. New York: Routledge Curzon, 2003.

Francis J. Gavin, Gold, Dollars, and Power: the Politics of International Monetary Relations, 1958-1971. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2004.

James H. Hughes, Citizen Cyborg: Why Democratic Societies must Respond to the Redesigned Human of the Future. Cambridge: Westview Press, 2004.

Sarah Kenyon Lischer, Dangerous Sanctuaries: Refugee Camps, Civil War, and the Dilemmas of Humanitarian Aid. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2005.

Paul McCarthy, Safeguarding the Organization Against Violence and Bullying: an International Perspective. Houndmills: Palgrave Macmillan, 2004.

John E. Mueller, The Remnants of War. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2004.

Daniel Ratner, Nanotechnology and Homeland Security: New Weapons for New Wars. Upper Saddle River, NJ: Prentice Hall, 2004.

Ella E. Schneider Hilton, Displaced Person: a Girl's Life in Russia, Germany, and America. Baton Rouge: Louisiana State University Press, 2004.