[Back]

Undergraduate Course Descriptions 2009-2010
Last updated 10/20/2009


01706/New Media Interdisciplinary Concentration (NMIC)

Lower Division Courses

1451. Survey of New Media (3 s.h.) F. $.

(Formerly: NMIC 0001 & 2001.)

This lecture course introduces the history and theory of computer/telecommunications media and new media arts. Todayís convergence of computational, telecommunications and audiovisual media is transforming human interaction at personal, local and global levels. Paradoxically it has introduced new modes of alienation while creating new means of contact. Simulation and interactivity suggest new kinds of realism. Random-access databases offer both greater control of information and the emergence of hypermedia narratives that allow the reader to get lost in information. Readings include the commentaries and works of philosophers, theorists, writers and artists and draw on theoretical and historical texts, fiction, interactive multimedia, audiovisual media and the internet.

Upper Division Courses

2002. Introduction to Interdisciplinary New Media 2 (3 s.h.) S. $.

(Formerly: NMIC 0002.)

Prerequisite: NMIC 1451 (0001 or 2001) or equivalent intro to digital multimedia. Students taking BTMM 1701 (0070) may not enroll in this course for credit.

Cross Listed with BTMM 2890 (0189).

Designing for a public community. The class will investigate both the technological and theoretical issues associated with public space, installation, information design and accessibility. The class assignment is to design an interactive experience in public space.

3001. Design and Visual Language (4 s.h.) F. $.

(Formerly: NMIC 0350.)

An introduction to creating, planning and producing visual communication design for the screen and print. Examining composition, typography as an element of information design and the interaction of color and form, text and image. Exploring the computer in relation to print animation, web and interactivity.

3002. Physical Computing (4 s.h.) $.

(Formerly: NMIC 0351.)

Physical Computing is an approach to learning how humans communicate through computers that starts by considering how humans express themselves physically. Students spend a lot of time building circuits, soldering, writing programs, building structures to hold sensors and controls, and figuring out how best to make all of these things relate to a personís expression.

3010. Special Topics in Production (4 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: NMIC 0391.)

Rotating class in New Media. Please check www.temple.edu/nmic for details or contact h.iverson@temple.edu.

3020. Special Topics (4 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: NMIC 0392.)

Rotating class in New Media. Please check www.temple.edu/nmic for details or contact h.iverson@temple.edu.

3030. Special Topics in New Media (4 s.h.) F S. $.

(Formerly: NMIC 0393.)

Cross Listed with FMA 3770 (0391), FMA 8240 (0902).

Rotating class in New Media. Please check www.temple.edu/nmic for details or contact h.iverson@temple.edu.

3040. Special Topics (4 s.h.) F SS.

(Formerly: NMIC 0394.)

Rotating class in New Media. Please check www.temple.edu/nmic for details or contact h.iverson@temple.edu.

4001. New Media Synthesis (4 s.h.) S. $.

(Formerly: NMIC 0302.)

Prerequisite: At least three prior new media courses, NMIC 1451 (0001 or 2001) & 2002 (0002) or equivalent or special permission by the instructor.

A capstone course in the New Media Interdisciplinary Concentration. A studio and critique based class for the development of a portfolio project suitable for grant and school applications. Projects will be conceptualized, prototyped and written about in a proposal format.

4002. Neighborhood Narratives (4 s.h.) F S. $.

(Formerly: NMIC 0352.)

Neighborhood Narratives is an out-of-the-classroom New Media interdisciplinary education project. It introduces students to the concept of locative media, where all types of media (analogue, digital, text, sound, image, etc.) are applied to real places and thus trigger real social interactions. The class researches the relationship between the self and place, the reciprocal action between what we carry with us and how we find our way through an urban landscape. Students design their own projects, using alternative methods that tie their stories to the environment at hand. The class provides a context within which to explore new and old models of communication, community and exchange. Neighborhood Narratives links the Philadelphia main campus of Temple University with its international campuses in London, Tokyo and Rome. The international network of classes videochats with each other throughout the semester, sharing their experiences and projects. All the location-based stories from each site are connected and archived using the web and mobile telephones. The final assignments are presented on location in the city.

4003. Game of Life (4 s.h.) $.

(Formerly: NMIC 0353.)

How can observation and participation in everyday life be translated into gaming structures? The class will review a broad sample of both traditional and electronic games. Students will be given assignments and readings to provoke analysis of digital environments, to explore interactive narrative, and to inspire the creation of an interactive universe of their own construction.

4010. Special Topics (3 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: NMIC 0395.)

Rotating class in New Media. Please check www.temple.edu/nmic for details or contact h.iverson@temple.edu.

4020. Special Topics (3 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: NMIC 0396.)

Rotating class in New Media. Please check www.temple.edu/nmic for details or contact h.iverson@temple.edu.

4030. Special Topics (3 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: NMIC 0397.)

Rotating class in New Media. Please check www.temple.edu/nmic for details or contact h.iverson@temple.edu.

4040. Special Topics (1 to 4 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: NMIC 0398.)

Rotating class in New Media. Please check www.temple.edu/nmic for details or contact h.iverson@temple.edu.

4082. Independent Study (1 s.h.) F S.

Directed projects and independent study in interdisciplinary new media. Topics will vary.


[Back] [Top]
Last updated 10/20/2009