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01906/Education (EDUC)

General Education

0815. Language in Society (3 s.h.) RCI: GB.

How did language come about? How many languages are there in the world? How do people co-exist in countries where there are two or more languages? How do babies develop language? Should all immigrants take a language test when applying for citizenship? Should English become an official language of the United States? In this course we will address these and many other questions, taking linguistic facts as a point of departure and considering their implications for our society. Through discussions and hands-on projects, students will learn how to collect, analyze, and interpret language data and how to make informed decisions about language and education policies as voters and community members.

Note: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and the Individual & Society (IN) requirement for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: ANTHRO 0815, English 0815, Italian 0815, PSYCH 0815, Russian 0815, Spanish 0815, or CSC+DIS 0815.

0817. Youth Cultures (3 s.h.) RCI: GB.

Do you listen to hip hop, spend all your time in Second Life, dress up like a cartoon character and go to anime fairs, or go skateboarding every day with your friends? Then youíre part of the phenomenon called youth culture. Often related to gender, race, class and socio-economic circumstances, youth cultures enable young people to try on identities as they work their way to a clearer sense of self. Empowered by new technology tools and with the luxury of infinite virtual space, young people today can explore identities in ways not available to previous generations. Students in this class will investigate several youth cultures, looking closely at what it means to belong. They will also come to appreciate how the media and marketing construct youth identities and define youth cultures around the world.

Note: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and the Individual & Society (IN) requirement for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed ANTHRO 0817, Education 0917 or SOC 0817.

General Education Honors

0917. Honors Youth Cultures (3 s.h.) RCI: GB.

Do you listen to hip hop, spend all your time in Second Life, dress up like a cartoon character and go to anime fairs, or go skateboarding every day with your friends? Then youíre part of the phenomenon called youth culture. Often related to gender, race, class and socio-economic circumstances, youth cultures enable young people to try on identities as they work their way to a clearer sense of self. Empowered by new technology tools and with the luxury of infinite virtual space, young people today can explore identities in ways not available to previous generations. Students in this class will investigate several youth cultures, looking closely at what it means to belong. They will also come to appreciate how the media and marketing construct youth identities and define youth cultures around the world. (This is an Honors course.)

Note: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under GenEd and the Individual & Society (IN) requirement for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed ANTHRO 0817, Education 0817 or SOC 0817.

Lower Division Courses

1196. Education and Schooling in America (3 s.h.) F S SS. RCI: AC & WI.

(Formerly: EDUC X060.)

The purpose of this writing intensive educational foundations course is to examine selected historical, philosophical and social issues that impact education in the United States. This course will examine the trends in educational studies as well as the political forces at work in the schools. The social and academic goals of education, the current conditions of the American educational systems, and the teaching profession will be addressed. This course presents an interdisciplinary analysis of education and schooling in the United States, examining how education policy has been shaped in the U.S., what important roles certain individuals, institutions and social groups have played in this process, how education policies have had differential impact on various groups. Enables students to study and critically evaluate schools as a significant social institution within the framework of American values and institutions.

Note: This course can be used to satisfy a university Core American Culture (AC) and Writing Intensive (WI) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university GenEd requirements. See your advisor for further information.

1255. Inclusive Education for a Diverse Society (3 s.h.) F S SS.

(Formerly: EDUC 0155.)

In Inclusive Education for a Diverse Society, students will explore the role of culture in education in the United States. A primary goal is to identify and capitalize upon ways in which culture impacts teaching and learning. A secondary goal is to become literate about the cultural underpinnings of todayís teachers, students, families and communities. Culture is viewed as a dynamic and evolving, interactive composite of characteristics affecting each of the individuals and groups in and around schools, as well as the curriculum, structures, policies and practices of the educational system in the United States. Each class session focuses on an aspect of diversity. In each case, legislation governing the education and related classroom experiences of groups are highlighted. Videotapes are used to provide a common experience from which students may offer and counter individual interpretations of events.

1322. The Developing Individual Across the Life Span (3 s.h.) F S SS.

(Formerly: EDUC 0122.)

The purpose of this course is to provide the student with a basic understanding of developmental theories and concepts as they relate to patterns of change in learners across the life span. Cognitive, language, social/emotional, and motor domains will be examined with emphasis placed on individual differences. Both typical and atypical development will be considered and you will be given the opportunity to relate theory to educational practice.

Upper Division Courses

2082. Undergraduate Independent Study (1 to 3 s.h.)

(Formerly: EDUC 0280.)

Prerequisite: Written approval of studentís advisor, faculty sponsor and Office Manager ELPS.

Students will have an opportunity to pursue special topics in their content area or to develop an in-depth project designed to meet personal and program objectives.

2179. Knowing and Learning in Mathematics and Science (3 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Special authorization required for all students. This course is restricted to students enrolled in TUteach.

This course focuses on issues of what it means to learn and know science and mathematics. What are the standards for knowing we will use? How is knowing and learning structured and how does what we know change and develop? For the science and mathematics educator, what are the tensions between general, cross-disciplinary characterizations of knowing (e.g. intelligence) and the specifics of coming to understand powerful ideas in mathematics and science? What are the links between knowing and developing in learning theory, and the content and evolution of scientific ideas? Also, current issues and tensions in education will be discussed, especially as it relates to mathematics and science instruction.

2205. Curriculum Instruction and Technology in Education (3 s.h.) F S SS.

(Formerly: EDUC 0205.)

Curriculum, Instruction and Technology in Education is one of the first in a series of courses designed to enable future teachers to develop skills of effective practice by engaging in and responding to authentic educational experiences. Students will observe authentic interactions among people in school environments. Students will develop learning objectives, and plan, deliver, and evaluate instruction in a simulated teaching/learning environment. The recording of simulated teaching and learning experiences is a primary component of the course. The recordings serve the dual purpose of allowing students to reflect and self-evaluate and providing the basis for peer-evaluation and instructor-student conferences. The development of several teaching skills, self-evaluation and reflection will create the opportunity for a lifetime of professional growth.

2211. English for Foreign Students (3 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: EDUC 0010.)

The focus of this course is on English skills needed for instructional purposes. The course offers students opportunities to develop communicative skills necessary for successful teaching and information about teaching in U.S. institutions of higher education (e.g., syllabi, instructional formats, and legal issues, such as sexual harassment and plagiarism).

Note: This course is for ITA students.

2212. English for Academic Purposes (2 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: EDUC 0020.)

Prerequisite: Graduate students whose TOEFL score is under 600 on PBT or 250 on CBT.

The purpose of this course is to improve graduate studentsí academic English and intercultural competence, necessary for successful participation in an academic environment. Students will work on developing their academic English skills through individual presentations and group discussions.

Note: This course serves as the graduate school requirement for new international graduate students.

2214. Curriculum and Supervised Teaching K-12 (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: EDUC 0214.)

Prerequisite: Education 2287 (0210).

The primary intent of the course is to provide prospective teachers with an opportunity to study teaching practice in an urban public school context by working directly with experienced teachers. The course is organized as a series of seminars and in-school experiences in which students, through inquiry and critical reflection, construct their own understanding of teaching. Specific experiences enable students to develop personal perspectives about how teaching professionals think in action and use professional knowledge in situations of practice.

Note: A field-based course generally taken in the senior year.

2224. Service Learning (2 to 3 s.h.) F S SS.

(Formerly: EDUC 0224.)

Prerequisite: Special permission required.

A course that helps students investigate what it means to be a community member and a teacher in a diverse, democratic society. The course combines reading, discussion, action in the community, and reflection in the context of addressing real community needs. In addition, students will begin to develop skills needed as a teacher to use service learning with his or her own students.

Note: Students will work in community organizations or after school programs. Students should not register for a class immediately following EDUC 2224 (0224). Students should not sign up for EDUC 2289 (0225) at the same time as EDUC 2224 (0224). Mode: Service Learning Course.

2255. Effective Use of Instructional Technology in Classrooms (3 s.h.) F S SS.

(Formerly: EDUC 0255.)

Prerequisite: Students must complete a technology assessment survey with an academic advisor from Student Services. Basic Microsoft Office skills are required. This review will become a part of the studentís advising record.

This course focuses on using technology to develop N-12 classroom applications to ensure effective teaching. Students are expected to begin to integrate technology into their teaching strategies. Students will develop technology competencies using modern technology to achieve this goal. Additional technology tools and software will be examined and reviewed for possible use in the N-12 classroom. Extensive internet work will be required.

2272. Instructional Practices in Middle Level Classrooms (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: EDUC 0272.)

An in-depth exploration of most effective research-based diagnosis and instrumental practices for the contemporary middle level classrooms. Emphasis is upon a curriculum which recognizes qualities of middle level learners.

2287. Practicum (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: EDUC 0210.)

Prerequisite: Admission to the five-year program.

A first hand opportunity to explore teaching as a profession. Organized visits to elementary, middle, and high schools are combined with assigned readings and seminars. Critical inquiry and reflection will allow for oneís essential personal commitment for success in teaching.

2289. Field Experience: Managing the Contemporary Classroom (3 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: EDUC 0225.)

Education 2289 introduces students to best practices in managing instruction and behavior in contemporary classrooms and to the principles that underlie those practices. Overall, the goal of the course is to ensure that students can identify and articulate the rationale for classroom routines and practices upon which effective instruction depends. This course requires students to spend two hours each week observing classes in an area school.

Note: Students who are seeking certification in Special Education should enroll in EDUC 2489 (0226).

2306. Assessment and Evaluation (3 s.h.) F S SS.

(Formerly: EDUC 0206.)

Students will learn how to develop and use a variety of evaluation methods to monitor student academic achievement and teaching effectiveness. Special emphasis will be placed on relating evaluations to curriculum and instruction. Students will learn about standardized tests and other diagnostic tools frequently encountered and/or used by classroom teachers. Particular attention will be given to adapting assessments to meet the needs of all students. Students will plan, construct, administer, and analyze data for a diagnostic evaluation of achievement for a content unit. Contemporary issues related to testing, grading, evaluation, and accountability will be addressed.

2489. Field Experience: Special Education (3 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: EDUC 0226.)

This course is designed to teach basic techniques for managing your classroom. While emphasis is placed on applied behavior analysis, other approaches will also be discussed. In addition, there will be a section on autistic spectrum disorders.

4288. Student Teaching in Elementary/Special Education (9 to 11 s.h.) F S. $.

(Formerly: EDUC 0381.)

Co-Requisite: Students must also register for Education 4801 (0388).

Practicum for full-time students and education majors who have completed all other program requirements.

Note: There is a $50 fee associated with all sections and numbers of student/supervised teaching. Student Teaching Applications are now online at www.temple.edu/education/studentteaching/index.html. Obtain your advisorís signature and return the completed application to the CITE Department advisor, 359 Ritter Hall.

4488. Student Teaching in Elementary/Special Education/Early Childhood Education (9 to 11 s.h.) F S. $.

(Formerly: EDUC 0382.)

Prerequisite: Completion of Early Childhood/Elementary Education sequence and a minimum grade point average of 2.5. Students must also register for Education 4801 (0388).

Students are admitted to student teaching only after their records and potential for success have been reviewed by the program faculty. Students will work under the guidance of cooperating teachers and Temple supervisors.

Note: There is a $50 fee associated with all sections and numbers of student/supervised teaching. Student Teaching Applications are now online at www.temple.edu/education/studentteaching/index.html. Obtain your advisorís signature and return the completed application to the CITE Department advisor, 359 Ritter Hall.

4588. Student Teaching in Elementary Education/Early Childhood Education (9 to 11 s.h.) F S. $.

(Formerly: EDUC 0383.)

Prerequisite: Must have passed the College of Educationís Intermediate Assessment. Students must also register for Education 4801 (0388).

Involves a school placement where students demonstrate their knowledge of and competence in early childhood teaching, birth through 3rd grade (N-3). Students work with a certified cooperating teacher and are supervised by a Temple University faculty member.

Note: There is a $50 fee associated with all sections and numbers of student/supervised teaching. Student Teaching Applications are now online at www.temple.edu/education/studentteaching/index.html. Obtain your advisorís signature and return the completed application to the CITE Department advisor, 359 Ritter Hall.

4688. Student Teaching in Secondary Education (9 to 11 s.h.) F S. $.

(Formerly: EDUC 0384.)

Prerequisite: Secondary Education sequence and a 2.5 average in the academic major. Students must also sign up for Education 4801 (0388).

Students are admitted only after they give evidence of appropriate professional maturity and the potential for success.

Note: There is a $50 fee associated with all sections and numbers of student/supervised teaching. Student Teaching Applications are now online at www.temple.edu/education/studentteaching/index.html. Obtain your advisorís signature and return the completed application to the CITE Department advisor, 359 Ritter Hall.

4788. Student Teaching in Secondary Education/Career Technical Education (3 to 9 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: EDUC 0385.)

Prerequisite: Must have passed the College of Educationís Intermediate Assessment. Students must also sign up for Education 4801 (0388).

Involves a full-time school placement where students demonstrate their knowledge of and competence in teaching discipline-specific subject matter to students in grades 7-12, and in some cases, K-12. Students work with a certified cooperating teacher and are supervised by a Temple University faculty member.

Note: Student Teaching Applications are now online at www.temple.edu/education/studentteaching/index.html. Obtain your advisorís signature and return the completed application to the CITE Department advisor, 359 Ritter Hall.

4801. Senior Seminar and Performance Assessment (3 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: EDUC 0388.)

Students will be involved in experiences that prepare them for making the transition from college to the practice setting, and engage in activities that foster professionalism in school and community settings. The senior performance assessment, which is a requirement for teacher certification students, is also a part of the course.

Note: This is a required course for all teacher certification candidates, which is taken during the student teaching semester.
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