Temple University Undergraduate Bulletin
Site Map | Bulletin Home | Temple University

Liberal Arts
introduction

General Information
Academic Advising
Academic Policies & Regulations
College Graduation Requirements
Student Contact Information
Faculty

Programs of study

African American Studies
Minor
American Studies
Minor
Minor, Asian American Studies
Anthropology
General Anthropology Track
Human Biology Track
Visual Anthropology Track
Minor, General Anthropology
Minor, Visual Anthropology
Arabic
Certificate
Asian Studies
Minor, Asian Studies
Minor, Asian American Studies
Certificate, Asian Business and Society
Chinese
Certificate
Classics
Concentration, Classical Languages & Literature
Concentration, Classical Civilizations
Minor
Minor, Ancient Mediterranean Studies

Criminal Justice

Minor
Critical Languages
Minor, Japanese
Certificate, Arabic
Certificate, Chinese
Certificate, Japanese
Economics
Minor, Economics
Mathematical Economics
Certificate, Political Economy
Certificate, Management Career
English
Minor
Certificate, Writing
Environmental Studies
Minor
French
Minor
Certificate, Foreign Language
Geography and Urban Studies
Minor
Double Major with College of Education
Certificate, Travel and Tourism
Certificate, Geog. of Tourism
Certificate, Geog. of Sports Rec. & Tourism Planning
German
Minor
Certificate, Foreign Language
Hebrew
Minor
History
Minor
Italian
Minor
Certificate, Foreign Language
Japanese
Minor
Certificate
Jewish Studies
Concentration, History
Concentration, Religion
Minor
Certificate, Jewish Secular Studies
Latin American Studies
Minor
LASS
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Studies (LGBT)
Mathematical Economics
Neuroscience: Systems, Behavior & Plasticity
Philosophy
Emphasis, Pre-Law
Minor
Political Science
Minor
Psychology
Minor, Psychology
Minor, Cognitive Neuroscience
Religion
Minor
Russian
Minor
Certificate, Foreign Language
Sociology
Concentration, Health Track
Minor, Sociology
Minor, Sociology of Health
Certificate, Health Research
Spanish and Portuguese
Language, Literature, and Linguistics
Language and Professional Studies
Spanish for Education
Minor, Spanish
Minor, Portuguese
Certificate, Multilingual Business and Gov. Studies
Certificate, Spanish
Certificate, Spanish and Latin-Amer. Studies, Business
Certificate, Latin-Amer. Studies, Health & Human Services
Certificate, Latin-Amer. Studies
Women's Studies
Minor
Certificate

other useful links

Temple Policies
University Core
Course Descriptions
Course Schedule
OWLnet
Admissions Application
Student Life
TUportal
Archived Bulletins
PDF Version
  Academic Programs / Liberal Arts

Psychology

Marsha Weinraub, Chair
658 Weiss Hall
215-204-7360
mweinrau@temple.edu

Peggy de Wolf, Associate Chair
606 Weiss Hall
215-204-3409
peggy.dewolf@temple.edu

Psychology identifies several learning goals for each level of instruction in the program. At the introductory level (generally 1000-level courses, including 1061, 1071 and 1167), goals include familiarity with the discipline as it is grounded in both the social and the natural sciences, as well as familiarity with basic descriptive statistical applications. At the Foundation level (generally 2000-level courses), there are two sets of goals. One set is directed toward the further development of critical thinking. This is achieved through two courses, 2168 (Inferential Methods in Psychology) and 2196 (Scientific Thinking in Psychology), which prepare students dispassionately to examine conflicting claims, to analyze data, to organize research papers, and generally to become more proficient with the scientific process. The second set of goals includes familiarity with a spectrum of content areas in the discipline, which are broadly organized in two groups: Developmental/Clinical/Social (DCS) and Bio-Behavioral Cognitive (BBC). Students are required to choose at least one course from each of these two general areas, and this ensures familiarity with a scope of information across two content areas. At the Advanced level (generally 3000-level courses), students are required to select three courses, either continuing with a broad selection or choosing to delve into greater depth in one area, such as clinical psychology. Finally, at the 4000 level, Capstone is the only course offered. This 4-credit writing-intensive course is designed to help students integrate their knowledge base, to develop further the critical and writing skills they have developed, and generally to synthesize their knowledge of the discipline.

Elective Psychology Courses At Any Level

Each term, the Psychology Department will offer a few courses that are not listed under the regular required curriculum. These courses will be open to both the Psychology major and the non-major and usually will have the prerequisite of only Psychology 1061.  Psychology majors taking these courses will receive elective CLA credit, which will contribute to the CLA upper-level course requirement.

Psychology 3791, 3891, 4791, and 4891 collaborative Research

One or two terms of Psychology 3791 - 3891 may be taken as elective psychology credit and helps fulfill the CLA upper-level course requirement.  Your student advisor has information on the research interests of the faculty.  You must contact the faculty member with whom you plan to work and receive their approval prior to registration.  Working with a faculty member on a research project can be a very valuable experience, and this course is an important one to have on your record when making application to graduate school.  The maximum credit permissible for 3791 - 4891 is 16 s.h.; a maximum of 4 credits each in 3791, 3891, 4791 and 4891.

Psychology 3785 - 3787 Internship

Designed for those who want to experience psychology in the workplace, the internship allows students to apply theory to real-life situations, build an employment record, and complement future applications for graduate work in psychology or social work.  Work placements are available in a number of different applications in psychology, including, but not limited to: organizational, applied behavior analysis; education; clinical and counseling psychology; opportunities to work with autistic children, probation officers; and a variety of other placements.  Each setting offers students a range of employment options that link classroom learning with practical experience.  Students graduating from the program will have on-the-job experience as well as recommendations and job performance evaluations so that they can move easily from their undergraduate studies into psychology-related job opportunities or into graduate schools with an applied focus. Contact Peggy de Wolf for information about our internships, 215-204-3409 or peggy.dewolf@temple.edu.

 

Requirements for the Major

41 Credit Hours in Psychology.

All Temple students must take a minimum of two writing-intensive courses. The specific writing-intensive courses required for this major are listed below and are identified by "WI" in the RCI column.

 

Introductory Courses Required:

Department Course # Course Name Hours RCI
Psychology 1061 Psychology as a Social Science 3 IN
Psychology 1071 Psychology as a Natural Science 3  
Psychology 1167 Foundations in Statistical Methods 3 QB
Subtotal     9  

Psychology Science Requirement:

Department Course # Course Name Hours RCI
Select one from list:   3-4 SA
Biology

Biology

Chemistry

Physics
1001

1011

1031/1033

1021
Human Biology
     or
General Biology I
     or
General Chemistry I and Lab
     or
Introduction to General Physics I
   
Subtotal     3-4  

Methods Courses Required:

Department Course # Course Name Hours RCI
Psychology 2168 Inferential Methods in Psychology 3  
    (Prerequisite: Psychology 1167 or equivalent)    
Psychology 2196 Scientific Thinking in Psychology 4 WI
    (Prerequisite: Psychology 1061, 1071, 1167)    
Subtotal     7  

Foundation Courses (2000 Level):

Three courses required – at least one each from the BBC Area (2101, 2102, 2103, 2104, 2501, 2502) and one from the DCS Area (2201, 2301, 2401, 2402). The third foundation course can be in either area. Foundation courses are prerequisites for the advanced (3000-level) areas.

Department Course # Course Name Hours RCI
Select one course from the DCS area (Prerequisite: Psychology 1061): 3  
Psychology
Psychology
Psychology
Psychology
2201
2301
2401
2402
Foundations of Psychopathology
Foundations of Developmental Psychology
Foundations of Social Psychology
Foundations of Industrial & Organizational Psychology
   
         
Select one course from the BBC area (Prerequisite: Psychology 1071): 3  
Psychology
Psychology
Psychology
Psychology
Psychology
Psychology
2101
2102
2103
2104
2501
2502
Foundations of Cognitive Psychology
Foundations of Evolutionary & Comparative Psychology
Foundations of Learning & Behavior Analysis
Foundations of Sensation & Perception
Foundations of Behavioral Neuroscience
Foundations of Cognitive Neuroscience
   
         
Select one course from either the DCS or BBC area 3  
     
Subtotal     9  

 

Advanced Courses (3000-3620):

Choose three from any of the advanced courses (3000-3620) for which you have completed the prerequisite foundation course.  These courses cover specialty areas within particular fields of psychology.

Department Course # Course Name Hours RCI
Advanced Courses - Select three:    
Psychology 3141 Neurobiology & Evolution of Social Behavior    
Psychology 3151 Direct Application of Behavioral Principles    
Psychology 3152 Experimental Psychopathology    
Psychology 3161 Research Methods in Perception    
Psychology 3162 Visual Recognition    
Psychology 3221 Clinical Psychology: Research & Practice    
Psychology 3223 Child Psychopathology & Treatment    
Psychology 3301 Phases of Development: Infancy
   
Psychology 3304 Personality, Social, & Emotional Development
   
Psychology 3305 Cognitive & Language Development    
Psychology 3306 Neuroscience of Development & Aging    
Psychology 3307 Theories of Development    
Psychology 3411 Social Cognition    
Psychology 3412 Psychological Studies of Social Issues    
Psychology 3417 Personnel Psychology    
Psychology 3418 Human Performance Improvement    
Psychology 3561 Psychopharmacology    
Psychology 3566 Neurobiology of Learning & Memory    
Subtotal of Advanced Courses 9  


Psychology Elective: one additional course at the Foundation Level or the Advanced Level.

Department Course # Course Name Hours RCI
Psychology elective Foundation or Advanced    
Subtotal     3  

 

Capstone Courses - One 4000-level course required:

(Seniors only - minimum of 90 credits completed and completion of both Method Level Courses)

Department Course # Course Name Hours RCI
Psychology 4496 Capstone: History of Psychology   WI
Psychology 4596 Capstone: Fields of Psychology   WI
Psychology 4696 Capstone in Psychology   WI
Psychology 4796 Capstone: Research   WI
Psychology 4996 Honors Capstone   WI
Subtotal     4  


Major Total 44-45  

 

Individual Study Courses:

(Permission of the instructor required.)

Department Course # Course Name Hours RCI
Psychology 2991 Honors Research I    
Psychology 3991 Honors Research II    
Psychology 4991 Honors Research III    
Psychology 4996 Honors Capstone   WI
Psychology 4998 Honors Research Problems   WI
Psychology 4182/4282 Independent Study In Cognitive Neuroscience I & II    
    (Prerequisite: Psychology 1167, Psychology 2168 AND Psychology 2196)    
Psychology 3791/3891/
4791/4891
Collaborative Research    
    (Prerequisite: Psychology 1071, Psychology 2168, Psychology 2196)    
Psychology 3785 Psychology Internship    
    (Prerequisite: Junior/Senior Psychology Major)    
Psychology 3787 Practicum    
    (Prerequisite: Junior/Senior Psychology Major)    

 

Distinction in Major

Completion of the Psychology Honors program.

 

The Psychology Honors Program:

Honors students take honors courses from the Psychology 3991–4996 sequence in the Junior and Senior years.  Independent study is guided by a faculty sponsor whose research interests coincide with the student's, and seminars deal with topics in research design as well as the substantive issues arising out of the student's research.  Grade requirement is a 3.5 GPA across all courses.  Contact Dr. K. Hirsh-Pasek, e-mail: khirshpa@temple.edu.

Department Course # Course Name Hours RCI
Psychology 3991 – 4996 Honors Program 1-4  

 

The Undergraduate Psychology Majors' Association

The Psychology Majors' Association is an organization intended to serve as an information base concerning faculty, classes, etc., a gathering/meeting place, and a social support network of students with diverse background/interests within the Psychology field.  We are located at 605 Weiss Hall and welcome the suggestion and input of all members.

PSI CHI - The National Honor Society in Psychology

The minimum requirements for membership in PSI CHI are a 3.20 cumulative GPA and a 3.50 GPA in Psychology courses.  Applications are available in the PSI CHI office, Room 605, Weiss Hall.

Student Advisor/Ombudsperson

When a grievance such as a grade dispute or personality conflict arises between an instructor and student, the student ombudsperson acts as a liaison or mediator in an attempt to resolve the problem.

The student ombudsperson for the Department of Psychology is located in 607 Weiss Hall, 215-204-1576.  The student advisor can also give fellow students helpful information in their major as seen through the eyes of a student.  The student advisor can provide any information concerning major requirements, core curriculum, graduate school, and academic procedures.

Phi Beta Kappa

See Supplemental Educational Opportunities: Academic Opportunities: Honor Societies.

Minor in Psychology

The Minor in Psychology introduces the student to a representative array of Psychology courses, prepares the student for the minimal course requirements for acceptance to most Psychology graduate schools, and results in formal university recognition on the student's official transcript. 

Department Course # Course Name Hours RCI
Psychology 1061 Psychology as a Social Science
3 IN
Psychology 1071 Psychology as a Natural Science 3  
Psychology 1167 Foundations in Statistical Methods 3 QB
Psychology 2168 Inferential Methods in Psychology 3  
Psychology 2196 Scientific Thinking in Psychology 4 WI
Subtotal     16  
         
Foundation Courses - Select one:      
Psychology 2101 Foundations of Cognitive Psychology    
Psychology 2102 Foundations of Evolutionary & Comparative Psychology    
Psychology 2103 Foundations of Learning & Behavior Analysis    
Psychology 2104 Foundations of Sensation & Perception    
Psychology 2201 Foundations of Psychopathology    
Psychology 2301 Developmental Psychology    
Psychology 2401 Foundations of Social Psychology    
Psychology 2402 Foundations of Industrial & Organizational Psychology    
Psychology 2501 Foundations of Behavioral Neuroscience    
Psychology 2502 Foundations of Cognitive Neuroscience    
Subtotal     3  
         
Advanced Courses - Select one:      
Psychology 3141 Neurobiology & Evolution of Social Behavior    
Psychology 3151 Direct Applications of Behavioral Principles    
Psychology 3152 Experimental Psychopathology    
Psychology 3161 Research Methods in Perceptions    
Psychology 3162 Visual Recognition    
Psychology 3221 Clinical Psychology: Research & Practice    
Psychology 3223 Child Psychopathology & Treatment    
Psychology 3301 Phases of Development: Infancy    
Psychology 3304 Personality, Social, & Emotional Development    
Psychology 3305 Cognitive & Language Development    
Psychology 3306 Neuroscience of Development & Aging    
Psychology 3307 Theories of Development    
Psychology 3411 Social Cognition    
Psychology 3412 Psychological Studies of Social Issues    
Psychology 3417 Personnel Psychology    
Psychology 3418 Human Performance Improvement    
Psychology 3561 Psychopharmacology    
Psychology 3566 Neurobiology of Learning & Memory    
Psychology 3615 History & Systems of Psychology    
Psychology 3620 Topics in Psychology    
Subtotal     3  
         
Total     22  


Cognitive Neuroscience Minor

Students in the College of Liberal Arts (including Psychology majors) as well as students in other colleges, schools, and departments may choose to minor in Cognitive Neuroscience. No more than two courses can be double-counted for the Psychology major and the Cognitive Neuroscience minor. Cognitive neuroscience is an interdisciplinary field with a focus on a fundamental mystery of science: how the mind arises from the brain.  A minor in Cognitive Neuroscience will strengthen the academic record of students who plan to apply for graduate programs.  For example, in Psychology this minor will strengthen applicants' records for specializations such as Behavioral Neuroscience, Clinical Neuropsychology, Cognitive Psychology, or Psychophysiology.  Students might also go into General Neuroscience or Cognitive Science.  Pre-med students with a Cognitive Neuroscience minor would present distinctive profiles to medical school admissions offices.

Department Course # Course Name Hours RCI
Psychology 2101 Foundations of Cognitive Psychology 3  
Psychology 2502 Foundations of Cognitive Neuroscience 3  
Communication Sciences & Disorders 3235 Human Neuroscience 4  
         
Select three cognitive neuroscience elective courses from the following listing: 10-13  
Biology 3352 Systems Neuroscience    
Biology 3356 Organization & Development of the Nervous System    
Philosophy 2144/4244 Philosophy of the Mind    
Psychology 4182/4282 Independent Study in Cognitive Neuroscience    
English

Communication Sciences & Disorders
2821

1108
Introduction to Linguistics
     or
Introduction to Linguistics

 
Psychology 3306 Neuroscience of Development & Aging    
Psychology 3561 Psychopharmacology    
Psychology 3566 Neurobiology of Learning & Memory    
         
Total     20-23  

 

, Temple University. All rights reserved. Site created by Computer Services