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02426/Russian

Lower Division Courses

0815. Language in Society (3 s.h.) Core: IN.

(Formerly: GE-HUMB 1022.)

How did language come about? How many languages are there in the world? How do people co-exist in countries where there are two or more languages? How do babies develop language? Should all immigrants take a language test when applying for citizenship? Should English become an official language of the United States? In this course we will address these and many other questions, taking linguistic facts as a point of departure and considering their implications for our society. Through discussions and hands-on projects, students will learn how to collect, analyze, and interpret language data and how to make informed decisions about language and education policies as voters and community members.

Note: This General Education `Human Behavior` pilot course fulfills the Core Individual & Society (IN) requirement.

0831. The American Dream: Hearing the Immigrant Voice (3 s.h.) Core: RS.

(Formerly: GE-RADV 1066.)

As a Temple student, you go to school and live in a city full of immigrants. Perhaps your own relatives were immigrants to the United States. But have you ever listened to their stories? With an historical and sociological framework as a basis, we will take an in-depth and more personal look at the immigrant experience as expressed through the immigrantsí own voices in literature and film. Topics explored include: assimilation, cultural identity and Americanization, exploitation and the American Dream, ethnic communities, gender, discrimination and stereotyping.

Note: This General Education `Race & Diversity` pilot course fulfills the Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement.

0868. World Society in Literature & Film (3 s.h.) Core: IS.

(Formerly: GE-WRLD 1171 (0060).)

Learn about a particular national culture by taking a guided tour of its literature and film. You donít need to speak a language other than English to take this exciting course, and you will gain the fresh, subtle understanding that comes from integrating across different forms of human expression. Some of the issues that will be illuminated by looking at culture through the lens of literature and film include family structures and how they are changing, national self-perceptions, pivotal moments in history, economic issues, social change and diversity. Each course section focuses on a specific country or culture. Click on the blue, six-digit CRN at the right of the course title in the Course Schedule (TU Courses) to see the specific topic.

Note: This General Education `World Society` pilot course fulfills the Core International Studies (IS) requirement.

0968. Honors World Society in Literature & Film (3 s.h.) Core: IS.

(Formerly: GE-WRLD 1971 (H060).)

Learn about a particular national culture by taking a guided tour of its literature and film. You donít need to speak a language other than English to take this exciting course, and you will gain the fresh, subtle understanding that comes from integrating across different forms of human expression. Some of the issues that will be illuminated by looking at culture through the lens of literature and film include family structures and how they are changing, national self-perceptions, pivotal moments in history, economic issues, social change and diversity. Each course section focuses on a specific country or culture. Click on the blue, six-digit CRN at the right of the course title in the Course Schedule (TU Courses) to see the specific topic. (This is an Honors course.)

Note: This General Education `World Society` pilot course fulfills the Core International Studies (IS) requirement.

1001. First-Year Russian I (5 s.h.) F. Core: LA.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0051.)

Students acquire skills to communicate in Russian on a variety of topics in predictable situations. Classroom work focuses on listening, speaking, reading and writing as students build their mastery of vocabulary and grammar. Emphasis on communication in a cultural context.

Mode: Seminar.

1002. First-Year Russian II (5 s.h.) S. Core: LA.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0052.)

Prerequisite: Russian 1001 (0051) or equivalent.

This 5-credit class focuses on communication in a cultural context. Students will improve listening, reading, speaking and writing skills while expanding their vocabulary.

Mode: Seminar.

1004. Intensive First-Year Russian (10 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0054.)

This is an intensive course for those students who wish to take first-year Russian but missed the fall semester option of Russian 0051 (1001). This course meets 10 hours per week and students have 3-4 hours of homework per night. By the end of the semester, students complete the entire sequence of first-year Russian (equivalent to Russian 0051-0052 / 1001-1002) and are prepared to enter second-year Russian in the following fall semester.

1082. Independent Study in Russian Language (1 to 5 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required.

This course is an independent study in Russian language for students not yet ready to take on the more advanced independent study of Russian 3082. It is designed to provide a bridge for students who transfer in to Temple and need some work to improve their Russian to be able to join an existing Russian language course. This course is NOT available to students who can be placed into an existing course and is NOT open to enrollment except by consent of the instructor.

1201. Russian Culture (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0055.)

Students in this course will study the historical origins of Russian culture and the modern manifestations of this rich culture. At the beginning of the 19th century, Russian culture had not established itself in the world canon in music or literature and had made only a tiny impression in the canon of world art. By the beginning of the 20th century, Russian masters had gained world renown in music, literature, dance, theater, painting, and in the newest art form, film. This course will describe the historical origins of this remarkable cultural transformation and explain how Russian culture has become an inextricably integral part of human culture.

Upper Division Courses

2001. Second-Year Russian I (5 s.h.) F. Core: LB.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN C061.)

Prerequisite: Russian 1002 (0052) or equivalent.

Students completing this course acquire skills they need to communicate with native speakers of Russian on a variety of topics in predictable situations. Students in this course work on listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills as they improve their mastery of Russian vocabulary and grammar. Classroom and homework activities emphasize contemporary standard Russian in its cultural and historical contexts. Materials from the Internet supplement textbook-based activities.

Note: Students who took Russian 0051/0052 prior to the 2006-2007 academic year should see an advisor before registering for this course.

2002. Second-Year Russian II (5 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0062.)

Prerequisite: Russian 2001 (C061) or equivalent.

Students completing the 2nd semester of this 2-semester sequence (Russian 2001/2002) acquire the skills they need to communicate with native speakers of Russian on a variety of topics in predictable situations. In this course students continue to work on listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills as they improve mastery of Russian vocabulary and grammar. Classroom and homework activities emphasize contemporary standard Russian in its cultural and historical contexts. Materials from the Internet, especially news articles from the Russian press, supplement textbook-based activities.

Note: Students who took Russian C061 (2001) before fall 2007 should consult with an advisor before registering for this course.

2101. Contemporary Russia in Literature and Film (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0140.)

Students read short stories and novels and watch recent Russian films to understand the cultural and historical context in which Russia finds itself today.

Note: This course is taught in English and includes required film screenings. All readings are in translation; all films are shown with English subtitles.

2102. Russian Short Story in English (2 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0142.)

Readings of selected masterpieces by authors such as Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Turgenev, Pushkin, Leskov, Chekhov, Gorky, and Bunin. Analysis and discussion.

2103. The Power and the Poet (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0141.)

Cross Listed with English 2114 (0152) and Political Science 2202.

Students read short stories and poetry written by dissident authors in the Soviet period and the post-Soviet period to understand the social and political context of authoritarianism and post-authoritarian cultural control, dissent, and the power of literature. Many of the works on the reading list were never published officially in the Soviet Union, but rather were works published in samizdat (unofficial or underground publication) or tamizdat (published abroad and smuggled back into the USSR). The course ends with the reading of a contemporary Russian novel for which the author was put on trial in 2004. Students also read some background on the historical, political, social and economic context of Soviet literature.

2111. 19th Century Slavic Literature in English (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0149.)

Cross Listed with Slavic 2111 (0149).

Survey of Slavic literature; reading of representative works from Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, Polish, Russian, Serbian, and Ukrainian literature.

2112. Modern Slavic Literature in English (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0150.)

Cross Listed with Slavic 2112 (0150).

Survey of East, West, and South Slavic literature; reading of representative works from Bulgarian, Croatian, Czech, Polish, Russian, Serbian, and Ukrainian literature.

2415. Russian History in Literature and Film (3 s.h.)

Cross Listed with History 2415.

Students will read and study a short history of Russia and then read literary works and watch films depicting various periods, topics, events, figures, and issues in Russian history.

2901. Honors Modern Russia In Literature and Film (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: RUSSIAN H190.)

Students in this course will read a wide range of literary and critical texts and view films from before, during (1985-1991) and after (1991-present) the Perestroika Era in Russia in order to gain an understanding of Russian cultural history and trends during and after the collapse of the Soviet Union. This is an HONORS course.

3001. Third-Year Russian I (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0225.)

Prerequisite: Russian 2002 (0062) or equivalent.

Selected readings from 19th century authors. Discussion, reports, and collateral assignments.

3002. Third-Year Russian II (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0226.)

Prerequisite: Russian 3001 (0225) or equivalent.

Selected readings from 20th century authors. Discussion, reports, and collateral assignments.

3003. Heritage Russian I (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0227.)

This course is the first of two designed for students who grew up in a Russian-speaking home and may have had some or much of their primary education in a Russian-language school. The course will help these students build on their oral fluency in Russian to develop literacy in Russian. The focus is on the acquisition of contemporary standard Russian (Moscow dialect). Students who speak other dialects in their home environments will be encouraged to recognize the difference between their home dialect and CSR and acquire CSR in order to use it in professional settings. One of the most important aspects of this work is to develop sensitivity towards informal and formal speech and writing styles, since students without a formal educational experience in Russian may have little training to speak and write in formal (professional) contexts.

Note: This course is for native Russian speakers.

3004. Heritage Russian II (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0228.)

This course is the second of two designed for students who grew up in a Russian-speaking home and may have had some or much of their primary education in a Russian-language school. The course will help these students build on their oral fluency in Russian to develop literacy in Russian. The focus is on the acquisition of contemporary standard Russian (Moscow dialect). Students who speak other dialects in their home environments will be encouraged to recognize the difference between their home dialect and CSR and acquire CSR in order to use it in professional settings. One of the most important aspects of this work is to develop sensitivity towards informal and formal speech and writing styles, since students without a formal educational experience in Russian may have little training to speak and write in formal (professional) contexts.

Note: This course is for native Russian speakers.

3082. Independent Study (1 to 3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0296.)

Prerequisite: Russian 2002 (0062) or equivalent.

Arranged each semester. Please consult with the instructor.

Note: Permission of instructor required. Considered only for extraordinary reasons.

3201. Service Learning in Russian I (2 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Russian 3001 (0225) or 3003 (0227).

Students spend 3 hours a week interacting in Russian with Russian speakers in the Philadelphia community in a service learning placement through agencies such as Lutheran Child and Family Services or Jewish Social Services. Course requires vocabulary quizzes, reflection in electronic diary and course forum, course meetings, oral presentations.

3202. Service Learning in Russian II (2 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Russian 3201.

Students who have completed one service learning course may take this course and spend 3 hours a week interacting in Russian with Russian speakers in the Philadelphia community in a service learning placement. Heritage speakers of Russian majoring in Russian are required to take this course as part of their major curriculum. This course requires two reflection papers in Russian.

3501. Russian for Business and Travel (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0120.)

Prerequisite: Russian 2002 (0062) or permission of instructor.

Intensive work in spoken and written Russian needed by business executives and other travelers. Vocabulary, idiomatic usage and special terminology for professional needs. Cultural aspects, practice in personal contact and letter writing.

4001. Fourth-Year Russian I (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0231.)

Prerequisite: Russian 3002 (0226) or equivalent or permission of the instructor.

Students will acquire the skills they need to communicate with native speakers of Russian on a variety of topics in predictable situations. In this course, students will work on listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills as they build their mastery of Russian vocabulary and grammar. Classroom and homework activities will emphasize contemporary standard Russian in its cultural and historical contexts. Materials from the internet will supplement textbook-based activities.

4002. Fourth-Year Russian II (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0232.)

Prerequisite: Russian 4001 (0231) or permission of the instructor.

Survey of Russian culture and civilization from its beginnings to the present.

4097. 4th-Yr Russian I: Comp & Conv (3 s.h.) F. Core: WI.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN W231.)

Prerequisite: Russian 2002 (0062) or equivalent.

Oral and written work, based on selected texts, with special attention to difficult topics.

Note: Capstone course. Required for concentration in Russian.

4101. Contemporary Russia in Literature and Film: Russian Trailer Section (4 s.h.)

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0240.)

This course meets with the English-language lecture Contemporary Russia in Literature and Film. Students taking the Russian trailer section of this course must attend the English-language lectures 3 hours per week, but also have a fourth hour in Russian with the instructor. Students in this Russian trailer section read all the texts for this course in Russian and discuss them in Russian with one another and the instructor. They also write two papers of 7-10 pages in length in Russian on short stories or films they have read or watched that were not presented to the larger lecture course in translation.

Note: This course is taught in Russian.

4103. The Power and the Poet (4 s.h.)

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0241.)

Prerequisite: Russian 3001 (0225) or equivalent or permission of instructor.

Students read short stories and poetry written by dissident authors in the Soviet period and the post-Soviet period to understand the social and political context of authoritarianism and post-authoritarian cultural control, dissent, and the power of literature. Many of the works on the reading list were never published officially in the Soviet Union, but rather were works published in samizdat (unofficial or underground publication) or tamizdat (published abroad and smuggled back into the USSR). The course ends with the reading of a contemporary Russian novel for which the author was put on trial in 2004. Students also read some background on the historical, political, social and economic context of Soviet literature.

Note: Fourth hour in Russian.

4104. Russian History in Literature and Film (in Russian) (4 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Russian 3001 (0225) or 3003 (0227).

Students will read and study a short history of Russia and then read literary works and watch films depicting various periods, topics, events, figures, and issues in Russian history. The fourth class hour of this course will be conducted in Russian; most readings and all papers will be assigned in Russian.

4111. Pushkin (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0351.)

Prerequisite: Russian 2002 (0062) or equivalent.

Reading and analysis of selected major works.

4112. Tolstoy (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0355.)

Prerequisite: Russian 2002 (0062) or equivalent.

Study and analysis of selected major works.

4113. Dostoevsky (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0356.)

Prerequisite: Russian 2002 (0062) or equivalent.

Reading and analysis of selected major works.

4114. Russian Novel (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0364.)

Prerequisite: Russian 2002 (0062) or equivalent.

Reading and analysis of selected major works.

4115. Russian Drama (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0371.)

Prerequisite: Russian 2002 (0062) or equivalent.

Reading and analysis of selected Russian plays.

4116. Russian Poetry (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0374.)

Prerequisite: Russian 2002 (0062) or equivalent.

Analysis of the major works of Russian poets.

4182. Advanced Independent Study in Russian Literature (1 to 3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0395.)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required.

Supervised reading, research, and reports on an advanced level in Russian language, literature or civilization.

Note: Considered only for extraordinary reasons.

4282. Advanced Independent Study in Russian Literature (1 to 3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0396.)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor required.

Supervised reading, research, and reports on an advanced level in Russian language, literature or civilization.

Note: Considered only for extraordinary reasons.

4483. Advanced Directed Readings in Russian Area Studies (1 to 3 s.h.)

(Formerly: RUSSIAN 0398.)

Students enroll in this course only with special permission from the instructor. In this course, students do advanced directed readings in Russian area studies, using Russian press and other Russian-language sources to explore Russia through disciplines such as anthropology, geography, history, political science, sociology, as well as contemporary business.


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