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  Academic Programs / Social Administration

School of Social Administration

Founded 1969


Linda Mauro, Interim Dean
553 Ritter Hall Annex
1301 W. Cecil B. Moore Avenue
215-204-8623
www.temple.edu/socialwork

Mission and Goals

BSW Program Objectives
Accreditation
Honors/Honor Society
Student Groups
Special Facilities


Mission and Goals

The School was established in 1969 to prepare individuals for professional practice and for positions of leadership in social work and in the broader human services arena. The distinctive mission of the School, rooted in humanistic and democratic values, is reflected in a broad and vigorous commitment to the elimination of human suffering and social injustice and to the promotion of human rights and social equality. Its educational programs are therefore centered on intervention strategies on behalf of those populations and persons who are underserved, victimized, or denied full access to social opportunities and resources. Poverty, racism, sexism, homophobia and other forms of discrimination and disenfranchisement are priority concerns of the School, as are those social problems associated with life in the inner city.

The School of Social Administration (SSA) is dedicated to societal transformations to eliminate social, political, and economic injustices for poor and oppressed populations, and advance the quality of life for all through:

  • Education emphasizing the discovery of knowledge and the use of critical inquiry and professional ethics to guide solution-seeking and action-taking to effect social change among professional social workers in front-line, supervisory, managerial, and leadership positions.
  • Research and scholarship to advance applied knowledge and generate evidence-based strategies to resolve problems occurring between people and their social environments at local, state, national, and global levels.
  • Public service to aid the dissemination of knowledge and evidence-based strategies, and the responsiveness of the School to the needs of constituents through collaborations and partnerships with communities, agencies, and organizations.

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BSW Program Objectives

At the completion of the BSW curriculum, students will demonstrate the ability to:

1. Apply strategies of social change and advocacy that help advance social, political, and economic justice.

2. Use critical inquiry and scientific research methods, both qualitative and quantitative, to evaluate and advance one’s own social work practice and that of the profession.

3. Understand and work to eliminate the forms and mechanisms of oppression and discrimination at all system levels.

4. Practice with knowledge, skills, and respect with regard to age, class, color, culture, ethnicity, family structure, gender, language, marital status, national origin, physical and/or mental disabilities, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation.

5. Understand and adhere to the values, ethical standards and principles of the social work profession.

6. Use knowledge of the social work profession’s history, concerns, and societal contributions to inform contemporary issues in practice.

7. Practice with the skills and knowledge base of a culturally competent generalist social work practitioner at all system levels.

8. Demonstrate professional use of self in their practice with effective communication skills, self-awareness, inclusion of supervision and consultation, and the creation of positive change within organizations and service delivery systems.

9. Understand, analyze, influence, and formulate social policies.

10. Critically apply theoretical frameworks, supported by empirical evidence, that offer insight into the development and behavior of individuals over the life span and the interactions among individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities.

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Accreditation

The Bachelor of Social Work and the Master of Social Work programs are accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. This attests to the educational quality of the curricula and to the qualifications of graduates to assume professional positions that legally require applicants to have these degrees.

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Honors/Honor Society

 

President's Scholars - A President's Scholar designation refers to a graduating senior who has earned a 3.75 cumulative GPA for the first seven semesters, or 108 credit hours.  Transfer students must have completed a total of 60 credit hours at Temple by graduation.   A special awards ceremony is held each year in April for these students and their families. 

Dean’s List - Academic achievement is recognized and valued by the School and the University. In this regard, the School follows the GPA recognized by the University. Dean's List is achieved each semester that a full-time student (12-17 semester hours) earns both a 3.50 semester average and a 3.50 cumulative average. Notation appears on the student transcript.

Alpha Delta Mu National Social Work Honor Society - Students with a cumulative GPA of 3.50 or above may apply for nomination to Alpha Delta Mu. Juniors and seniors are eligible for membership. Students should discuss this with their advisors.

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Student Groups

Students at Temple University's School of Social Administration are part of a diverse community.   The School offers an opportunity to be in class with diverse students who have had different life experiences and who represent varied points of view.   In addition to classroom learning, SSA offers a number of ways in which students can come together as a community.  The main student organization at SSA is the SSA Student Collective.

The Student Collective is the organization of both undergraduate and graduate students matriculated in the SSA Program.  The Student Collective sponsors activities each academic year of a social, educational, and professional nature.  Student representatives, selected by the Collective, sit on various School committees as voting members.  The Collective was formed to represent a unified student voice that incorporates all the diversity of the student body.  For additional information, contact the Director of Admissions and Student Services or see the bulletin board in the lobby on the fifth floor of Ritter Hall Annex.

In addition to the Student Collective, students can choose to participate in a range of other social work organizations at SSA.  The activity level of many groups varies from year to year since their existence is dependent on students stepping forward and organizing meetings and events.

Groups that are consistently active include:


National Social Work Honor Society (Beta Rho Chapter, Alpha Delta Mu)

The purpose of this organization is to advance excellence in social work practice and to encourage, stimulate and maintain scholarship of the individual members in all fields, particularly in social work.  For current activities, see the bulletin board in the lobby on the fifth floor of Ritter Hall Annex.

Alumni Association

For more information about SSA's alumni/ae association, contact the General Alumni Association for names and numbers of current officers at 215-204-7524.

National Association of Social Workers-Philadelphia Division  (NASW)

NASW is a professional organization that works on behalf of its members and the consumers they serve.  Applications are available on the NASW bulletin board in the lobby on the fifth floor of Ritter Hall Annex.

If you are interested in contributing your time, energy and ideas to any of the following groups that have added, over the years, to the rich diversity of activities at SSA, please contact the Director of Admissions and Student Services. 

Latino Social Work Organization (LSWO)

LSWO was founded in 1992 by a group of young social workers in Chicago.  Temple students involved in LSWO have advocated for quality bilingual/bicultural services to Latinos and other oppressed communities.  


Student Association of Black Social Workers (SABSW)

SABSW is a non-profit organization created to serve African-American students and the community.  The SABSW works towards unifying Black Social Work students in the School of Social Administration.  The SABSW will also work with any student organization on campus or the immediate community to further the educational, political, academic, communal, and social plight of students at large. 


Pride in Social Work (PSW)

PSW provides support, education, and advocacy for gay, lesbian, bi-sexual and transgendered students and their supporters.  For additional information on Pride in Social Work at Temple University, contact Professor Bernie Newman at 215-204-1205. 

Underground Railroad – Temple Depot (URR)

The URR works together with the Poor People’s Economic Human Rights Campaign focusing on direct actions, such as lobbying, advocacy, demonstrations, and support of grass-roots movements for social justice. 


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Special Facilities

Job Resources Bank

In addition to the help provided by the Office of Career Development Services, the School of Social Administration maintains its own Job Resources Bank geared specifically to the needs and career interests of social workers.  Information about employment opportunities is regularly collected, updated, and posted in the lobby on the fifth floor of Ritter Hall Annex.  SSA also organizes an annual Jobs Fair with a wide range of agencies attending.   The School's liaison in Career Services meets frequently with students to provide career information as well as specific leads on employment. The Office of Career Services plans and conducts special workshops and seminars specifically oriented to students in Social Administration.

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