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02422/Political Science

Political Science C052 or C053 are pre- or co-requisite for Political Science 0200-0265. All courses numbered 0105-0199 assume students have Political Science C051 as a pre- or co-requisite. All courses numbered 0270-0277 assume students have Political Science W101 as a pre- or co-requisite.

Preparatory Courses

0004. Discovering Political Science (1 s.h.)

The course is designed to introduce students to the discipline, career opportunities, and the faculty in the political science department. In addition, the course will acquaint students with related social science departments and the university.

Note: The course meets twice a week for one-half of the semester. This is a one-credit course for students considering Political Science as a major and for Political Science majors.

Lower Division Courses

R050. The Individual, Race, and American Political Life (3 s.h.) SS. Core: IN and RS.

This course focuses on the relationships between individuals and their government in the United States, investigating how government has handled the issue of insuring individual equality under democracy. It will explore the ways in which the exclusion and incorporation of various groups in American society have been affected by race and class.

Note: Political Science majors should consult with an adviser about enrolling in this course.

C051/H091. The American Political System (3 s.h.) SS. Core: AC.

An introduction to American politics. Focuses on the values, institutions, and processes of politics and government in the United States. Introduces the concepts and techniques of political science.

Note: This course required of all Political Science majors. This course also satisfies the American Culture core requirement.

C052/H092. Foreign Governments and Politics (3 s.h.) SS. Core: IS.

This course considers the values, institutions and processes of politics and government in selected developing and developed countries in Europe, Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

Note: For both non-majors and majors. Mode: Simulations and films.

C053/H093. International Politics (3 s.h.) SS. Core: IS.

This course is an introduction to the nature of the international system, the determinants and instruments of foreign policy, and the problems of international conflict and cooperation.

Mode: Class discussion and possibly simulations of current international problems.

Upper Division Courses

W101. Introduction to Political Philosophy (3 s.h.) SS. Core: WI.

Prerequisite: English C050.

Reading of selected works by several classical and modern political philosophers, such as Aristotle, Hobbes, and Marx; study of their relevance to contemporary political issues.

Note: Capstone writing course in the major.

0103. Evidence, Proof, and Knowledge: An Introduction to Research Methods (3 s.h.)

This course is an introduction to elementary statistics, survey research techniques, research design, and data processing.

0105. The American Presidency (3 s.h.)

The role of the chief executive, the American presidency, in the political process.

0107. American Federalism (3 s.h.)

Federalism in its modern form is perhaps the single most important theoretical contribution the American system of government has made to the history of political thought. This course will examine this concept, its manifestation, and the effect this federal practice has had on the American political system.

0110. The Legislative Process (3 s.h.)

Covers the legislative process of both the U.S. Congress and state legislatures. Includes the lawmaking process, legislative organization, leadership and policymaking, lobbying and elections, and the careers and characteristics of legislators.

0115. The American Supreme Court (3 s.h.) SS.

An examination of judicial decision making and the interrelationships between the Court and other aspects of the political process.

0116. Judicial and Bureaucratic Administration of Justice (3 s.h.)

The course provides an introduction to the structure and functions of the American legal system, its relation to other parts of the American political system, and how law contributes to public policy.

0117. American Constitutional Principles I (3 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Political Science C051 or equivalent.

Constitutional bases of American system of government as interpreted primarily by reading and analysing Supreme Court opinions and understanding them in their political, economic, and historic context. Course focuses largely on how constitutional meaning is determined, and judicial development of national powers of judicial review, the power to regulate commerce, separation of powers, federalism, taxation, powers of the President, and foreign affairs and war powers. Prerequisite: PS 51 or equivalent.

0118. American Constitutional Principles II: Civil Rights in America (3 s.h.)

Civil rights in America, including the Constitutional protections of freedom of speech, press, assembly, and religion.

0124. Interest Group Politics (3 s.h.)

Over the past 30 years, the system of interest group representation in Washington has witnessed a rapid expansion. Conventional wisdom views these groups as obstructions to American democracy, but limiting their freedoms threatens "government by the people." Cases to be studied may include: senior citizen groups, the farm lobby, the Christian Coalition, the unemployment workers movement, and the power of business in America.

0125. Media and the Political Process (3 s.h.) SS.

This course considers the relationship between the mass media and American politics, government regulation of the mass media, media coverage of public affairs, political effects of entertainment programming, and the uses and influence of the media in the election process. Both print and broadcast media will be considered.

0126. American Public Opinion (3 s.h.)

Topics for study include: development of public opinion and political ideology in the U.S.; the social psychology of political attitudes; the role of the mass media and the news in the formation of political opinion; and the influence of public opinion upon government policy.

0127. Campaigns, Elections, and the Media (3 s.h.)

Role of elections in contemporary American society. Special attention to parties and mass media as participants in campaigns and to factors affecting voting behavior of the mass public and the linkages voting provides between the public and policy formation.

0128. Political and Social Movements (3 s.h.) F S.

Facing often dangerous and difficult conditions, ordinary people have been able to do extraordinary things through collective action. This course introduces students to the main theoretical approaches to social movements and explores important cases of collective struggle in the Americas.

0129. American Party System (3 s.h.)

The evolution and organization of political parties in the United States, including nominating systems, campaigns, election laws, types of ballots, and electoral reform techniques.

0133. Politics, Rights and Sexual Orientation (3 s.h.)

This course examines the emergence and development of the movement to secure rights for gays, lesbians and bisexuals; how gays, lesbians and bisexuals are socially constructed and the influence this has on political discourse; how political issues that are relevant to the lives of gays and lesbians reach the political agenda; and the patterns of conflict and cooperation that exist among actors in and outside of government over issues such as employment discrimination, marriage, child adoption, and military service.

0135. Urban Politics and Problems (3 s.h.)

This course presents an overview of the politics of urban areas: electoral politics, government structure, race, finance, education, housing, neighborhoods, and economic and historical forces on politics in urban areas.

0136. Metropolitan Philadelphia (3 s.h.)

An examination of the political system of Philadelphia, including such issues as the division of power between the Mayor and City Council; matters of party and interest group politics as they impact on Philadelphia government; and relationships among city government, the Commonwealth, and the Federal government.

0137. Metropolitan Government (3 s.h.)

This course examines the politics and governance of metropolitan areas. It approaches the problems of cities in the context of the regions surrounding them, exploring dependencies and inequalities between cities and suburbs. The Philadelphia metropolitan region will serve as a case study for exploring these topics.

0141. The Politics of Inequality (3 s.h.)

Who are the poor? Should they be helped? Who should help them? These questions are complicated because people are more aware of the individual costs of taxation than they are of the collective benefits of an educated work force. This course will evaluate how the U.S. government has traditionally divided the poor between the deserving and the undeserving poor and which groups have been left out and why.

0143. Popular Culture and the City (3 s.h.)

Cross Listed with American Studies 0142 and Geography and Urban Studies 0142.

This course will examine how the city is depicted in films and literature, exploring such prominent political topics as anti-urbanism; political machines, corruption, and reform; industrialization and immigrant life; post-industrialism and urban decline. Attention will also be given to the physical city and spatial use as expressions of dominant political and cultural values.

0145. American State and Local Politics (3 s.h.) SS.

This course considers government and politics of subnational units including states, counties, cities, towns, and townships in urban, suburban, and rural areas. Further topics include the relationship of state and local policy to citizens, other governmental units, and the American political system.

0150. U.S. Public Policy Making (3 s.h.)

This course examines selected policy areas in a variety of national settings and the relationship of political cultures and policy making structures to policy outputs.

0151. Public Policy Analysis (3 s.h.)

This course considers selected contemporary public policy issues. The course begins with an examination of the national political-economic context within which major policy issues arise and then turns to the analysis of the roots and policy alternatives on several major issues. Issues may concern health, energy, education, employment, welfare, and the regulation of business.

0152. U.S. Environmental Policy (3 s.h.)

An analytical examination of the development and execution of governmental policies in such areas as air and water pollution control, control of atomic energy, and planning of space exploration program.

0153. The Politics of Poverty (3 s.h.)

This course examines the nature and causes of poverty, the impact of public opinion and racial attitudes on poverty and welfare, the role of government officials in shaping anti-poverty and welfare reform policies, and welfare claiming as a form of political participation. The course evaluates the effectiveness of existing policies to combat poverty and whether proposed policies might be effective.

0158. Business and Public Policy (3 s.h.)

Reviews history of US government and business, and the major governmental institutions dealing with business, with special attention paid to monetary policy and the Federal Reserve, fiscal policy, the federal budget, and particular issues connected with it such as deficits, Social Security, the tax structure, overall inequality, and other current issues. Also looks at the World Trade Organization and NAFTA, their structure and overall advantages and disadvantages to the US.

0165. Public Administration (3 s.h.)

This course studies basic concepts and approaches to public management and public policy making in public administration.

W190. Political Fiction (3 s.h.) Core: WI.

This course is intended to provide an understanding of the subtleties of American politics by reading novels and viewing films as well as through the more traditional literature of political science.

0201. Democracy in Europe (3 s.h.)

This course explores the institutions established in West European nations intended to preserve social stability, produce economic prosperity, and guarantee democracy, asking whether these goals are complementary or contradictory. A country-by-country examination of post-war political development in Britain, France, Germany, Italy, and Sweden. Emphasis on the political problems of the present. Accordingly, the course closes with an examination of the European integration process and the sweeping changes of East Europe affecting all of Europe.

0212. Post-Communist Politics (3 s.h.) F S.

This course examines core themes in the study of post-Communist politics in Russia and Eastern Europe. The course begins by exploring the nature of socialism, why it fell, and the various legacies of this system. The rest of the course covers issues of democratic transformation, economic reform, state and nation building, and the role of international influences.

0215. Comparative Politics: Developing Nations (3 s.h.) F.

This course describes and analyzes political patterns in the third world. It provides a descriptive overview, analyzes domestic political trends within the context of the global system, and reviews current trends.

0236. China: Politics and Revolution (3 s.h.) S.

Cross Listed with Asian Studies 0240.

This course surveys contemporary Chinese politics and political economy, recognizing the roots in China's long history. The emphasis is on the process of converting the Maoist socialist system into a modern market system, integrated into the global system, and the political implications of these changes.

0238. East Asia and the United States (3 s.h.) S.

Cross Listed with Asian Studies 0241.

This course introduces Japan and its distinctive model of political economy. The course then reviews how this model has been copied by many other countries in Asia. The course also includes an analysis of Asia's international economic and political relations, especially with the United States.

0241. Nationalism, Ethnicity, and Politics (3 s.h.) S.

When the U.S. was founded as the first modern nation-state, it set in motion a global transformation of the state system that has still to run its course. The class will study, with the aid of film, the causes, theories, and projections of this development.

W244. Politics of Modern Capitalism (3 s.h.) S. Core: WI.

Since the early 1970s, all advanced industrial democracies have faced challenges in adjusting to a changing international economy. We will examine how different countries, including the United States, Japan, Britain, France, and Germany, have tried to meet these challenges. The main question guiding the course is: why do countries respond to roughly similar problems in different ways, and what do these responses reveal about politics in these countries? Topics covered will include macroeconomic policy, trade and industrial policies, industrial relations, business-government relations, and the welfare state.

0250. Foreign Policy Analysis (3 s.h.) S.

This course examines how foreign policy is made by the governments of nation-states, as well as what determines the distinctive foreign policies of such states as the U.S., Russia, China, Japan, Germany, France, the U.K., and others.

0251. U.S. Foreign Policy (3 s.h.) F S.

Analysis of U.S. foreign policy from three perspectives: (1) competing explanations for patterns, tendencies and events in U.S. foreign policy; (2) history of U.S. foreign policy from independence to the end of the Cold War, (3) issues in contemporary U.S. foreign policy in light of the first and second perspectives.

0260. Post-Cold War Security (3 s.h.)

This course examines the debate over the changing meaning of security and the contemporary international security environment. Topics include: the nature of security, the international environment, postmodern terrorism, information warfare, global economic instability, the persistence of American hegemony, quasi-states, and the possible demise of the nation-state.

0261. Politics of the Global Economy (3 s.h.)

This course studies competing explanations for the evolution and operations of the international political economy from the origins of the industrial era in the late 18th century through the "information economy" of the 21st. It focuses on four functional areas: international trade in goods and services, the management of currency exchange and international monetary policy, the pattern and flow of investment capital, and the pattern and structure of global production.

W262. The International Legal Order (3 s.h.) Core: WI.

The historical development of international law in its relation to the evolution of the world political system, with analysis of issues of the contemporary world order such as warfare, political and economic development, human rights, and the environment.

0263. International Organization (3 s.h.)

This course considers the development and current roles of regional and universal international organizations with an emphasis on the United Nations. The major international conflicts of recent decades in the organizational context will also be examined.

0264. Theories of War and Peace (3 s.h.)

This course explores the problem of war and peace from both empirical and theoretical perspectives. Sources of war and peace studied include: the balance of power, deterrence, arms races, misperception, hegemony, nationalism, international institutions, democracy, law, and economic interdependence.

0265. International Environmental Policy (3 s.h.)

This course examines international negotiations and agreements on environmental problems and comparisons of domestic environmental policy making among selected countries. Special attention will be given to negotiations on atmospheric and oceanic policies, international regulation of nuclear materials, and the environmental aspects of international trade agreements.

0270. Classical Political Philosophy (3 s.h.)

Close study of works by one or more political philosophers, stressing their relevance to an understanding of contemporary politics.

0271. Modern Political Philosophy (3 s.h.)

Close study of works by one or more modern political philosophers, stressing their relevance to an understanding of contemporary politics.

0272. American Political Thought (3 s.h.)

This course examines significant political ideas from the American colonial period to the present and the influences of these ideas on contemporary American political institutions.

0273. Marxism and Politics (3 s.h.)

A theoretical and historical examination of the role of Marxism in the development of 20th century political regimes, including former and present Communist states, West European social democracy, and Third World nations. Particular focus will be placed on debates within the Marxist tradition and between Marxism and its critics in regard to issues of equality, liberty, and democracy. An attempt will be made to see what aspects (if any) of Marxism remain relevant to the prospect of radical democratic change.

0274. Human Nature and Politics (3 s.h.)

This course studies human behavior and its relationship with politics and political philosophy.

0275. Theory and Uses of Power (3 s.h.)

This course considers concepts and major models of power and their applications to American politics.

0276. Democracy, Capitalism, and Socialism (3 s.h.)

An examination of some of the major political ideologies dominant in the 20th century and of the tensions and points of convergence between and among them.

0277. Theories of Justice (3 s.h.)

This course examines both analytical and historical perspectives of some of the major theories of justice that have been propounded throughout the course of Western history.

0291. Junior Fall Honors Seminar (3 s.h.) F.

Prerequisite: Departmental approval required.

The fall junior Honors seminar (taught as a combined seminar with PS 0391) will rotate among selected advanced topics in one of the major fields in Political Science (international relations, American government, political theory, comparative politics and public policy). The seminar will focus on a close analysis and discussion of assigned readings and a final research paper (as well as other short written assignments).

Note: Only Political Science majors in their sophomore year or above may apply. Successful completion of the Honors program involves grades of B or better in two of the four offered Honors seminars: Political Science 0291, Political Science 0292, Political Science 0391, and Political Science 0392. Check with the Honors seminar coordinator for the topic and instructor for a specific semester.

0292. Junior Honors Seminar (3 s.h.) S.

Prerequisite: Departmental approval required.

Students may apply for admission to the Honors program any time before the fall semester of their senior year. The spring Honors seminar (taught as a combined semester with Political Science 0392) will rotate among selected advanced topics in one of the major fields of Political Science (international relations, American government, political theory,comparative politics, and public policy). The seminar will focus on a close analysis and discussion of assigned readings and a final research paper (as well as other short written assignments).

Note: Check with the Honors seminar coordinator for the topic and instructor for a specific semester.

0302. Women and Politics (3 s.h.)

The goal of this course is to broaden with a comparative perspective our understanding of women's political experiences. We examine a variety of issues concerning the lives of women worldwide, including their economic, political and social contributions, familial roles and status in society. Initially, the course focuses on the evolution of the political, economic, and social status of American women paying particular attention to issues of race, ethnicity, and class that inform but also complicate women's political behavior. We then search for similarities and differences in women's lives that are usually obscured by the status of their countries as either industrialized or non-industrialized, either democratic or non-democratic.

0303. Seminar in American Government (3 s.h.)

Examines a topic of contemporary interest in American politics and government.

0310. Seminar in Comparative Politics (3 s.h.) S.

Examines a topic of contemporary interest in comparative politics.

0316. Seminar in International Politics (3 s.h.)

Examines a topic of contemporary interest in international politics.

0322. Seminar in Political Philosophy (3 s.h.)

Examines a topic of contemporary interest in political philosophy.

0327. Seminar in Public Administration (3 s.h.)

Examines a topic of contemporary interest in public administration.

0371/0372/0373. Cooperative Education Project in Political Science I, II, III (3 s.h. each) F S SS.

Provides political science majors with work experience relating to their academic training.

Note: Juniors and seniors with a minimum overall average of 2.0 are accepted subject to approval by the departmental co-op committee chairperson.

0382/0383/0384. Directed Research and Field Study (2, 2, 3 s.h. respectively) F S SS.

Prerequisite: Four courses in Political Science.

Supervised individual readings, research projects, and field work.

Note: Students may not enroll for more than one 0380ís course in a single semester. Students are to arrange study with a faculty member in the department of Political Science.

0391. Senior Fall Honors Seminar (3 s.h.) F.

Prerequisite: Either previous admission to the departmental Honors program and successful completion of Political Science 0291 or 0292, or approval of the departmental Honors Committee, a 3.3 cumulative grade average, a 3.3 average in Political Science, and completion of two of the four required political science courses.

Students entering the Honors program in their senior year must apply prior to the end of their junior year. Successful completion of the Honors program involves grade of B or better in two of the following four Honors seminars: Political Science 0291, Political Science 0292, Political Science 0391, and Political Science 0392. The fall junior Honors seminar (taught as a combined seminar with Political Science 0291) will rotate among selected advanced topics in one of the major fields in Political Science (international relations, American government, political theory, comparative politics, and public policy). The seminar will focus on a close analysis and discussion of assigned readings and a final research paper (as well as other short written assignments).

Note: Check with the Honors seminar coordinator for the topic and instructor for a specific semester.

0392. Senior Honors Seminar (3 s.h.) S.

Prerequisite: Previous admission to the departmental Honors program and successful completion of either Political Science 0291, Political Science 0292, or Political Science 0391.

Successful completion of the Honors program involves grade of B or better in two of the following four Honors seminars: Political Science 0291, Political Science 0292, Political Science 0391, and Political Science 0392. The spring Honors seminar (taught as a combined seminar with Political Science 0291) will rotate among selected advanced topics in one of the major fields in Political Science (international relations, American government, political theory, comparative politics, and public policy). The seminar will focus on a close analysis and discussion of assigned readings and a final research paper (as well as other short written assignments).

Note: Check with the Honors seminar coordinator for the topic and instructor for a specific semester.
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