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Intercollegial Programs

Goals and Objectives

Intercollegial programs at Temple include a national honor society and a growing number of interdisciplinary academic programs that involve students and departments in more than one of the University's schools and colleges. These programs provide students with opportunities to cross the boundaries of traditional academic disciplines, combine a variety of perspectives, and take advantage of faculty expertise in different departments and colleges. They are designed to accommodate students' interests and prepare students for success in a variety of career fields. The schools and colleges collaborating in these societies and programs are indicated in each description. Each colleges' degree requirements are described in the college sections of this Bulletin. Students should consult the contact person for an intercollegial society or program for more information about both collegial policies and requirements and the society or program itself.

Special Programs

Phi Beta Kappa

Phi Beta Kappa is an honor society open to juniors and seniors in the College of Liberal Arts and the College of Science and Technology. To qualify for Phi Beta Kappa a student must be majoring in arts and sciences subjects and studies, and must be taking a course program expected to include no fewer than 96 hours of letter-graded courses of liberal arts work among the hours required for the BA degree. If you have questions or would like to find out further requirements, please contact Stephanie Smith, Faculty Director of Academic Advising, Temple University, College of Liberal Arts, 1330 West Berks Street, Philadelphia, PA 19122, at (215) 204-8115, or sgsmith@temple.edu .

AMERICAN CULTURE AND MEDIA ARTS

Carolyn Kitch, Ph.D., Director
330D Annenberg Hall
215-204-5077
ckitch@temple.edu

The American Culture and Media Arts major combines faculty and courses from the American Studies program (in the College of Liberal Arts), the Film and Media Arts Department, and the Journalism, Public Relations and Advertising Departments, (in the School of Communications and Theater). It is one of the first programs to bridge two schools at Temple, making use of the University’s broadest resources. Students may choose this major from either school (CLA or SCAT), with the requirements the same in either case. The major is a response to the fact that mediated culture – film, television, radio, photography, print journalism – has come to dominate the experience of Americans, while at the same time American values and traditions inform our creation and reception of the media. They will also develop skills in historical and contemporary research. Majors sign up, in their senior year, for a semester or more of Internship at one of any number of media-related industries and museums in the Philadelphia area, designed to give students practical experience. Academic work and fieldwork are coordinated and keyed to the student’s program of study and interests.

Students graduating with the American Culture and Media Arts degree can expect to pursue careers in media-related organizations, e.g., film, video, and radio production; archival and library positions, particularly in media institutions; public relations jobs in media; museum research positions supporting exhibitions and media; and writing about media for publications. Graduates can also pursue advanced training at the graduate level in documentary film production.

36 credits are required for the major.

REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR

Department

Course

Title

s.h.

Core Indicator

Select one of these two:

FMA

0102

Production of Media Culture

3

 

JPRA

C055

Introduction to Mass Media

3

IN

Select five courses from this list (SCAT):

FMA

X155

Introduction to Film and Video Analysis

3

AR

WI

FMA

0202

Production Research and Development

4

 

FMA

0203

Theory and Practice of Media Culture

4

 

FMA

W360

History of Documentary

4

WI

FMA

W368

History of Narrative Film

4

WI

JPRA

060

Introduction to Visual Communications

3

 

JPRA

0222

Intro to Magazines

3

 

JPRA

0226

Intro to Advertising

3

 

JPRA

0320

Race and Racism in the News

3

 

JPRA

0335

History of Journalism

3

 

JPRA

0352

Gender and American Mass Media

3

 

Select five courses from this list (American Studies):

Am St

0102

Technology and American Culture

3

 

Am St

0103

American Places: Home, City, Region

3

 

Am St

0104

The Arts in America

3

 

Am St

0105

Ideal America: Reform, Revolution and Utopia

3

 

Am St

0108

Immigrant Experiences in America

3

 

Am St

R112

African American Experiences

3

RS

Am St

W118

The American Woman: Vision and Revision

3

WI

Am St

0124

Political Protest and Culture in the 60s

3

 

Am St

0125

Photography in America

3

 

Am St

0126

Documentary Film and American Society

3

 

Am St

0127

Mass Media and Amer. Pop Culture

3

 

Am St

0128

Philadelphia Neighborhoods

3

 

Am St

R136

Asian American Experience

3

RS

Am St

W140

Radicalism in the U.S.

3

WI

Capstone Course (select one) Majors sign up, in their senior year, for either an academic thesis project or an internship at a media-related industry or museum in the Philadelphia area.

Am St

W393

Senior Seminar in American Studies

3

WI*

FMA

0380

Senior Media Culture Thesis I

4

Writing Capstone

JPRA

0391

Special Projects

1-4

 

* Indicates Writing Capstone for the Major

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Robert J. Mason, Director
330 Gladfelter Hall
(215) 204-5918
envtstud@temple.edu
http://www.temple.edu/env-stud

Students will be equipped with the scholarly background and intellectual skills to understand a wide range of pressing environmental issues, and they will come to appreciate the physical, economic, political, demographic, and ethical factors that define those issues. Among the many environmental problems central to our program are groundwater contamination, suburban sprawl, river basin management, environmental justice, and the greening of abandoned urban spaces. Our graduates find employment with government environmental agencies, citizens' organizations, consulting firms, and corporate environmental affairs departments.

Offered jointly by the College of Liberal Arts and College of Science and Technology, Environmental Studies includes both B.A. and B.S. options. A minor also is offered and a Certificate of Completion is an option for those already holding an undergraduate degree in a different field.


B.A. Requirements

Department

Course #

Course Name

Hours

Core Indicator

Prerequisite Courses

Math

C055

College Mathematics

3

QA

Geology

C050

Introduction to Geology 

4

SA

Economics

C051

Macroeconomic Principles

3

IN

Economics

C052

Microeconomic Principles

3

IN

Core Courses

Envt. Studies/Geog. & Urban St.

C050

Environment & Society

3

IN

Biology

C083

General Biology I

4

SA

Biology

C084

General Biology II

4

SB

Geology

C081

Environmental Resources

 

     ------------------OR------------------

 

 

Envt. St./Geog. & Urban Studies

C052

Introduction to the Physical Environment

4 SB
Statistics Courses

Math

C067

Elements of Statistics

   

       ------------------OR------------------

 

 

Statistics

C021

Statistical Methods & Concepts 

3 QB
Advanced  Requirements

Economics

W255

Energy, Ecology, & Economy

3

WI

Envt. Studies

W300

Senior Research Seminar

3

WI

Elective Courses

12-16  

In addition to the required courses and their prerequisites, B.A. majors must take five (5) courses from the list of approved electives. One of these courses must be a policy course and one must be from the natural sciences.

B.S. Requirements

Department

Course #

Course Name

Hours

Core Indicator

Prerequisite Courses

Geology

C050

Introduction to Geology

4

SA

Chemistry

C071/C073

General Chemistry I w/ Lab

4

SA

Chemistry

C072/C074

General Chemistry II w/ Lab

4

SB

Chemistry

0121/0123

Organic Chemistry I w/ Lab

4

 

Economics

C052

Microeconomic Principles

3

IN

Calculus Requirement

Math

C075/
0076

Calculus I/
Calculus II

4
4

QB

                   ------------------OR------------------

Math

C085/
0086

Calculus I/
Calculus II

4
4

QB

Core Courses

Envt. Studies/Geog. & Urban St

C050

Environment & Society

3

IN

Biology

0103

Introduction to Biology

4

 

Biology

0104

Introduction to Biology

4

 

Biology

0227

Principles of Ecology

4

 

Geology

0210

Introduction to Hydrology

4

 

Envt. St./Geog. & Urban St.

C052

Introduction to the Physical Environment

4

SB

Statistics Requirement

Statistics

C021

Statistical Methods & Concepts 

3

QB

                     ------------------OR------------------

Math

0133

Probability and Statistics

3

 
Advanced Requirements

Economics

W255

Energy, Ecology, & Economy

3

WI

Envt. Studies

W300

Senior Research Seminar

3

WI

Elective Courses

In addition to the required courses and their prerequisites, B.S. majors must take four (4) courses from the list of approved electives. One of these courses must be a policy course and an additional one must be from the social sciences.  Because Biology 0227 and Geology 0210 are required for the B.S., they cannot be double-counted as electives.

Requirements for the Minor

Department

Course #

Course Name

Hours

Course Indicator

Envt. St./Geog. & Urban Studies 

C050

Environment & Society

3

IN

 

ONE OF THE FOLLOWING (plus any required prerequisites):

Biology 0227

0227

Principles of Ecology

4

 

                      -------------OR-------------

Geology Hydrology 

0210

>Intro to Hydrology

4

 

                      -------------OR-------------

Envt. St./Geog. and Urban Studies 

262

Fundamentals  Geographic Information Systems 

3

 

                       -------------OR-------------

Economics

W255

Energy, Ecology, and Economy

3

WI

 

Elective Courses--One policy course from list of approved electives plus three additional topics courses from list of approved electives

List of Environmental Studies Electives

POLICY

 

Community & Regional Planning 0250

Planning Policy and Law

Envt. St./Anthropology 0205

Heritage Management in Archaeology

Economics 0246

Public Finance

Economics 0248

Economics of State & Local Government

Economics 0281

Government Regulation of Business

Envt. Engineering Tech. 0316

Environmental Regulations

Environmental Studies 0225

Environmental Law and Regulation

Envt. St. 250/Geography & Urban St. 0250

Environmental Policy Issues

Envt. St. 152/Political Science 0152

U.S. Environmental Policy

Envt. St. /Political Science 0265

International Environmental Policy


TOPICS

 

Envt. St. /Anthropology 0220

Environmental Physiology

Envt. St. /Anthropology 0317

Seminar in Environmental Archaeology

Envt. St. /Anthropology 0320

Field Session in Archaeology

Envt. St. /Anthropology 0321

Methods in Archaeology
(Sediments, Soil, & Stratigraphy)

Envt. St. /Anthropology 0325

Biocultural Adaptions in Human Populations

Biology 0227

Principles of Ecology

Biology 0236

Freshwater Ecology

Biology 0237

Marine Environments I

Biology 0238

Marine Environments II

Biology 0245

Marine Ecology

Biology 0316

Tropical Marine Biology: Coral Reef Biology in Tropical Belize

Botany 0102

Plant Ecology

Community & Regional Planning 0100  

History and Practice of Community and Regional Planning

Community & Regional Planning 0203

Urban Form and Design

Community & Regional 0205 

Environmental Planning

Community & Regional Planning 0223 

Sustainable Community Design and Development

Community & Regional Planning 0262

Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems

Envt. Engineering Tech. W312

Industrial Hygiene and Safety

Environmental Studies 0280

Special Topics in Environmental Studies. 

Environmental Studies 0290

Internship--Environmental Studies

Environmental Studies 0295

Independent Study--Environmental Studies

Envt. St. 0150/Geography & Urban St. 0150

The Urban Environment

Envt. St. 0155/Geography & Urban St. 0156

Environment & Development 

Envt. St. 0215/Geography & Urban St. 0215

Geographic Basis of Land Use Planning

Envt. St. 0238/Geography & Urban St. 0238/ Asian St. 0238

Environmental Problems in Asia

Envt. St. 0239/Geography & Urban St. 0239

Medical Geography

Envt. St. 0254/Geography & Urban St. 0254

Energy, Resources, and Conservation

Envt. St. 0256/Geography & Urban St. 0256

Political Ecology

Envt. St. 0257/Geography & Urban St. 0257

Hazards Geography

Envt. St. 0262/Geography & Urban St. 0262

Fundamentals of Geographic Information Systems

Geology 0210

Introduction to Hydrology

Geology 0211

Facies Models

Geology 0261

Introduction to Geochemistry

Geology 0310

Use of Micro-Computers in Geology: Remote Sensing

Geology W381/H391

Environmental Seminar

Envt. St./History 0177 

U.S. Environmental History

Horticulture C236

Soils

Horticulture 0310

Landscape Management and Restoration

Horticulture 0317/0318

Sustainable Food Crops I/II

Journalism, Public Relations, and Advertising 0350

Environmental Reporting

Landscape Architecture 0206/ Landscape Architecture 0208

Environmental Land Planning/
Land Planning Studio

Landscape Architecture 210

Summer Field Ecology

Law X093

Tobacco in America: From Pocahontas to Virginia Slim

Envt. St. 0156/Philosophy 0156

Philosophical Perspectives on the Environment

Religion 0304 

Earth Ethics

Statistics 278

Statistics for Experiments

 

MATHEMATICAL ECONOMICS

Dimitrios Diamantaras, Adviser, Department of Economics
Ritter Annex 623
215-204-8169
dimitrios.diamantaras@temple.edu
or
Boris A. Datskovsky, Adviser, Department of Mathematics
Wachman Hall 632
215-204-7847
boris.datskovsky@temple.edu

The Departments of Economics and Mathematics offer the Mathematical Economics program as a platform for systematic concentration in the mathematical approach to economics. Economics has progressed in the last several decades by making extensive use of mathematical techniques. As a result, students who wish to pursue graduate study in economics, finance, accounting and other disciplines that make an extensive use of economics, need a thorough grounding in both economics and mathematics. The Mathematical Economics curriculum provides this grounding with a broad selection of courses that cover all important areas of economics and the mathematical tools required for a critical, deep mastery of these areas. This program is especially recommended for those students who intend to pursue graduate studies in Economics.

Mathematical Economics Required courses

Department

Course #

Course Name

Hours

Core

Indicator

Mathematics

C085

Calculus I

4

QB

Mathematics

0086

Calculus II

4

 

Mathematics

0127

Calculus III

4

 

Mathematics

0147 or 0148

Linear Algebra or

Linear Algebra with Computer Lab

3

4

 

Mathematics

0233

Introduction to Probability Theory

3

 

Mathematics

0234

Introduction to Mathematical Stat.

3

 

Mathematics

0253

Numerical Analysis I

4

 

Mathematics

0200+

Three Math courses 200 or higher, or

Two Math courses 200 or higher and Math W14112

9

 

CIS

0067, or

0068, or

C071

Programming elective

4

QB

Economics

C052

Microeconomic Principles

3

IN

Economics

0201

Intermediate Microeconomic Analysis

3

 

Economics

0202

 Intermediate Macroeconomic Analysis

3

 

Economics

0240 or

0203

or

0510

Mathematical Economics

Economics of Risk and Uncertainty

Math for Economics I

3

 

Economics

0241

Introduction to Econometrics

3

 

Economics

W302

Economics Writing Seminar

3

WI*

Economics

0200+

Two Economics courses 200 or higher, by permission of adviser

6

 

SubTotal

62 or 63

 

1 Mathematics 0227 and Economics 0283 cannot both be counted toward the major.

2 Math W141 must be taken prior to Math 0247 or Math W205.

All courses must be passed with a grade of C- or better. 

POLITICAL ECONOMY

William Lynn Holmes, Department of Economics
215-204-8175
wholmes@sbm.temple.edu

Richard Deeg, Department of Political Science
215-204-7123
rdeeg@vm.temple.edu

A joint program of the Department of Economics and the Department of Political Science leading to certificate of specialization in political economy.

PURPOSE

The purpose of the Political Economy program is to provide undergraduate students with the opportunity to study more intensely the relationship between the political and economic spheres of society. The program is based on the belief that a focused examination of this relationship provides us with a better understanding of several social phenomena: Chief among these is a better understanding of public policy choices and the policy making process, as well as a better understanding of how government actions affect the process of economic change and vice versa.
For these reasons the Political Science and Economics departments offer an interdisciplinary certificate in Political Economy. The program is open to all matriculated undergraduate students. Applicants need not be declared majors in either economics or political science. The Political Economy program provides an excellent preparation for graduate study in the social sciences and for the study of law.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

The program consists of two components; required core courses at the lower-division level and elective courses at the upper-division level.

Core - All students must take the following core courses:
C051 (or H091) - Macroeconomic Principles
C052 (or H092) - Microeconomic Principles
C051 (or H091) - The American Political System
AND
One of the following:
C052 (or H092) - Foreign Governments and Politics
C053 (or H093) - International Politics

Elective Courses
All students must successfully complete (grade of C- or better) four courses from the following list. Two of the four courses must be in economics, and two courses must be in political science. Students should select courses that correspond to their own substantive interests and are encouraged to take cognate areas (e.g., if you choose international politics courses, also choose international economics courses). Students should plan their schedules well in advance, since many courses are not offered each semester.

Economics
Econ 0217 - History of Economic Theory
Econ 0220 - Economics of Development and Growth
Econ 0244 - The Economics and Management of Privatization
Econ 0246 - Public Finance
Econ 0248 - Economics of State and Local Governments
Econ 0250 - International Trade
Econ 0251 - International Monetary Economics
Econ 0255 (or W255) - Energy, Ecology, and Economy
Econ 0262 (or W262) - Health Economics
Econ 0270 - Economics of Labor Markets
Econ 0272 - Women in the Economy
Econ 0279 - Public Control of Business: Antitrust
Econ 0281 - Government Regulation of Business
Econ 0282 - Economics of American Industry

Political Science
PS 0135 (or W135) - Urban Politics and Problems
PS 0141 - Politics of Inequality
PS 0145 - American State and Local Politics
PS 0150 - U.S. Public Policy Making
PS 0151 - Public Policy Analysis
PS 0152 - U.S. Environmental Policy
PS 0158 - Business and Public Policy
PS 0215 - Comparative Politics: Developing Nations
PS 0238 - East Asia and the United States
PS 0244 (or W244) - Politics of Modern Capitalism
PS 0261 - Globalization and World Politics
PS 0265 - International Environmental Policy
PS 0273 - Marxism and Politics
PS 0276 - Democracy, Capitalism, and Socialism

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