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Undergraduate Bulletin

College of Science and Technology
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Founded 1998 

Chris D. Platsoucas, Dean 
411 Barton Hall
1900 N. 13th Street
215-204-2888 
www.temple.edu/cst

GOALS AND OBJECTIVES

Science and technology have been responsible for a profound transformation of the world in the twentieth century and will drive the economy of the twenty-first century. The objectives of the undergraduate programs of the College of Science and Technology are to prepare students for careers in these important areas, and to graduate informed, responsible citizens. 

The College approaches science and technology as a body of knowledge that has an advancing frontier and a complex interface with society. The traditional mandate for a university is to provide undergraduate students with a comprehensive education and the opportunity to focus closely on a particular area of study. The College of Science and Technology embraces this mandate 
and extends additional opportunities to our students. Science and Technology 
students are encouraged to participate in faculty research projects and thus 
experience the advancement of this body of knowledge. The Center for Student Professional Development introduces undergraduate students to the interface between science and technology and society by offering work experience as interns in technology-based companies and agencies and by helping them to prepare for careers in these areas. 

All undergraduate students in the College must satisfy the requirements of the Core Curriculum. The Core is designed to prepare students to be fully engaged members of the University community and of society by ensuring their acquisition of effective communication and quantitative reasoning skills and a common background in the social sciences and humanities. The ability to think critically and express thought clearly and precisely is an invaluable asset of an educated person. The increasing reliance of society upon numerical data makes it essential for individuals to understand how meaningful inferences can be obtained from data and how to recognize fallacious inferences. Informed judgment requires awareness of the diversity of viewpoints and knowledge to act in accordance with a universal morality. Personal fulfillment rests upon the appreciation of truth and beauty manifested in works of religion, philosophy, and the arts. 

Baccalaureate programs lead from the Core Curriculum toward mastery of the subject matter, methods, and values of a chosen field to prepare students for a fulfilling future. Bachelor of Science programs offer a greater concentration in major course work; Bachelor of Arts programs offer a greater variety of course work. All programs offer undergraduates the opportunity to work with distinguished faculty and a richly diverse and stimulating student body as they prepare for active roles in society. 

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Special Programs

Study Abroad

Undergraduates may pursue a large variety of study abroad options. Temple University has campuses in Rome, Italy and Tokyo, Japan; a program in London, England; exchange programs with universities in England, Germany, and Puerto Rico; and summer programs in France, Ghana, Great Britain, Italy, Japan, and South Africa. See International Programs for more information about study abroad options. 

University Honors Program

Students in the College of Science and Technology may apply to the University Honors Program. Students in the Honors Program take specially- designated Honors courses to fulfill their University Core requirements. See Academic Programs/University Honors.

Five-year Master's Programs and Teacher Certification

The Biology, Chemistry, Geology, Mathematics, and Physics Departments enable talented students to complete both a bachelor's and a master's degree in five years. 

Students who want to combine teacher certification with a major in one of these areas may take a minor in Education during their undergraduate study. After earning a bachelor's degree in one of the aforementioned disciplines, students spend an additional year as a graduate student in the College of Education. Students who complete this program earn a Master of Education degree and are certified to teach in Pennsylvania schools. See the College of Education for more details. 

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Awards and Student Associations

Awards

Juniors and seniors are often honored for outstanding performance in a variety of academic areas and for exceptional service to the College and the University. Information about these awards is available in departmental offices or in the Office of Undergraduate Advising, A306 Barton Hall. 

Majors' Associations

Many of the departments within the College of Science and Technology support student interest organizations known as Majors' Associations or Societies. Each department organization provides an opportunity for students to interact with faculty and other students who share similar interests. It is through these venues that students may influence course offerings, faculty recruitment, and departmental policy. 

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College Council of Science and Technology (CCST)

The College Council of Science and Technology is the student government of the College of Science and Technology. This council is an effective and responsive student government that promotes the general welfare of the student body of the College of Science and Technology. This government is the venue for student opinion and expression concerning matters relevant to the student body and the College at large. 

  • All students, graduate and undergraduate, are welcome to become members of CCST. 
  • Major Associations within the College are eligible to receive funding from CCST. 
  • General Assembly (GA) meetings are held every month, and the GA is opened to all CST students. 
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Policies and Regulations

University policies and regulations apply to all undergraduate students and provide a framework within which schools and colleges may specify further conditions or variations appropriate to students in their courses or programs. 

Academic Residency Requirements

Students who transfer into the College of Science and Technology must complete at least 30 of their last 45 semester hours of course work at Temple, and at least half of the courses required in the major must be taken at Temple.  Please refer to degree programs for the specific number of major courses required.

Course Eligibility

The College of Science and Technology offers three types of undergraduate courses: 

1. Preparatory courses numbered 0001-0049: open to all students, full-time, part-time, matriculated, and non-matriculated. 

2. Lower Level courses numbered 0050-0099: open to all students including non-matriculated students who are in the process of completing or have completed required preparatory courses and have completed appropriate course prerequisites. 

3. Upper Level courses numbered 0100-0399: open to all matriculated students who have completed all necessary preparatory courses and appropriate course prerequisites. These courses are also open to all non-matriculated students who have achieved matriculation equivalency (see below) and have completed appropriate course prerequisites. 

Courses Taken Elsewhere by CST Students

Students in the College of Science and Technology who wish to take courses at another institution must petition the Office of the Dean for approval prior to enrolling in such a course.  Petition forms are available in the Office of Undergraduate Advising, A306 Barton Hall.  Students must first acquire course descriptions for the courses they wish to take.  They then take these descriptions, along with a completed petition form, to the departments which house the courses to receive departmental approval.  If  departmental approval is granted, then students should submit the completed petition to the Office of Undergraduate Advising for final approval.  Courses taken without prior approval will not be applied toward graduation. 

Courses Inapplicable to Graduation

Semester hours earned in Mathematics 0015 (formerly Mathematics 0001), Military Science, and RCC-Enhanced courses are excluded from the total minimum semester hours required for graduation. 

Dean's List

College of Science and Technology students must satisfy the following to be included on the Dean's list.

During a fall or spring semester, a full time student must:
1.  pass 12 or more credits;
2.  receive no incompletes (I) nor withdraw (W) from any classes;
3.  achieve a grade point average of 3.5 or higher.

During a fall and the following spring semester, a part time student must:
1.  pass 12 or more credits;
2.  receive no incompletes (I) nor withdraw (W) from any classes;
3.  achieve a grade point average of 3.5 or higher. 

Grading

Major, Minor, and Core courses must be completed with a letter grade of C- or higher.  Math courses must be completed with a letter grade of C or higher. 
 

Graduation Procedures

All College of Science and Technology students are required to complete a graduation review with an adviser in the Office of Undergraduate Advising prior to the first semester of their senior year.  Students should schedule a review once they have completed 75 semester hours.  The graduation review involves a detailing of the courses completed and those which remain to be completed for graduation.  Once the review is completed by a professional adviser, the review is forwarded to the student's department for approval by the faculty adviser. 

Notice of Anticipation of Graduation

Early in the semester in which students will complete their degree requirements, they must notify the Office of Undergraduate Advising in writing of their intent to graduate by completing a graduation application. Graduation applications are available at the Office of Undergraduate Advising. The deadlines for returning the application are: 

  • October 15, 2001, for fall semester 2002 
  • February 17, 2002, for spring semester 2003 
  • June 2, 2002, for second summer semester 2003 

Plagiarism and Academic Cheating

Plagiarism and academic cheating are prohibited by the College of Science and Technology. The development of independent thought and a respect for the thoughts of others is essential to intellectual growth. The prohibition of plagiarism and cheating is intended to foster this independence and respect. See Academic Policies in this Bulletin. 

The penalty for plagiarism or cheating as a first offense is normally an F in the course in which the offense is committed. In such cases, the instructor writes a report to the Dean. The College of Science and Technology Grievance Committee adjudicates student appeals and serious cases or repeat offenses referred to the Committee by an instructor or the Dean. The Dean may recommend suspension or expulsion from the University when warranted. 

Probation and Dismissal

Students must maintain a 2.0 GPA each semester, in their major, and overall to remain in good academic standing.  A student whose semester GPA falls below a 2.0 will be placed on academic warning.  If the student's  cumulative GPA also falls below a 2.0 or if the student has two consecutive semesters in which the semester GPA falls below a 2.0, the student will be placed on academic probation.  A student whose semester GPA falls below a 2.0 during a semester in which s/he is on probation is subject to dismissal from the College.

Readmission

College of Science and Technology students are required to submit a readmission application after one full semester (fall or spring) of non-attendance.  Readmission applications are available in the Office of Undergraduate Advising, A306 Barton Hall.  Students who apply for readmission after being dismissed must complete twelve credits at another institution and earn a 2.5 GPA or higher before readmission can be granted.  The deadline for readmission for the fall semester is August 1, and the deadline for readmission for the spring semester is December 15.

Intra-University Transfer

In order to transfer into the College of Science & Technology, a student must 
meet with an advisor in the College Office of Undergraduate Advising. The 
advisor will evaluate the studentís record in accordance with the following policy:

1. Students in their first semester at Temple University who wish to transfer into 
the College of Science & Technology will be automatically approved, provided 
that they are taking a core level Mathematics course.

2. Continuing students who wish to transfer into the College of Science & 
Technology must have a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.25 or higher 
and must have completed both a core level Mathematics course and a core level 
Science (or additional core level Mathematics) course, both with a grade of C 
(2.0) or better. 

Withdrawal from Classes

The College of Science and Technology follows the University policy regarding withdrawals.  See Academic Policies.

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Academic Advising

The Role of the Academic Adviser

Advising is essential to a productive and satisfying academic experience. The Office of Undergraduate Advising guides students from new student orientation through graduation to ensure that they complete all degree requirements and work to their fullest potential. Faculty advisers in each major use their knowledge of departmental curriculum to help students choose courses consistent with their specific career objectives.  The Collegeís advising program combines the expertise of professional advisers with the experience of seasoned faculty members to create a challenging and supportive environment for learning. 
For more advising information, please call (215) 204-2890.

The Office of Undergraduate Advising

College of Science and Technology students' professional advising needs are served in our Office of Undergraduate Advising, located in A306 Barton Hall. Specialized services offered by this office include: 

New Student Orientation- Advising and Registration for new freshmen and transfer students. 
Walk-In Advising and Registration Services- Students may want to meet with professional advisers at different times during their academic career to check on remaining graduation requirements. Terminal Registration (with a signed Registration/Schedule Revision form) is required for students with a GPA below 2.00 and for any students registering for 18 or more credits. 
Transfer Credit Evaluations and Reviews- transfer credits are checked against collegiate and Core Curriculum requirements. 
Academic Planning and Goal Setting gives students the opportunity to examine in depth their career options within a particular discipline and to explore other academic and personally fulfilling interests with the guidance of an adviser. 
Graduation Reviews are a check at the end of the junior year to help students understand and plan for their remaining graduation requirements. Students who have completed 75 credits should schedule an appointment with a professional adviser for this review. 
Petitions for Exception to Policy are reviewed on a rolling basis by the Director of Undergraduate Student Services. Typical petition requests include those for overload approval, to attend another institution for a semester or summer session, curriculum exceptions and the like. 

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Departmental Advising

After their New Student Orientation advising and registration session, students' academic credentials are copied and forwarded to their major department for subsequent advising by faculty advisers. (An original file is always maintained at the collegiate level in the Office of Undergraduate Advising.) Faculty advising is very important in developing ties between a student's academic program and his or her professional goals. Faculty advisers may assist students in finding research opportunities and professional internships and will help students choose courses that will best prepare them for their field of interest within a particular discipline. 

Academic Advising and Student's Responsibility

All academic advisers are trained to read and evaluate information carefully to give students the best possible advice. However, primary responsibility for curriculum completion rests with the student. Every student must be aware of the requirements of his or her degree, and should obtain advising on a regular basis to ensure timely completion of his or her program. 

Student Advisers/Ombudspersons

Each department in the College of Science and Technology has a Student Adviser/Ombudsperson (SA/O) who is a qualified undergraduate student in that department. The SA/O is thoroughly familiar with requirements and curricula of the department, and can competently advise fellow students on the courses and faculty members of the department. He or she also has information about career options for the departmentís graduates. 

Student Grievance Procedure

The SA/O is familiar with the College of Science and Technology Grievance Procedure, and is the first person to consult in case of an academic grievance. The SA/O will serve as a student-faculty liaison, and attempt to resolve the grievance. A student must initiate this first stage of the academic grievance procedure no later than 30 days after the beginning of the fall or spring semester immediately following the completion of the course in which the grievance occurred. A copy of the College of Science and Technology grievance procedure can be obtained from the SA/O. Each SA/O has an office in his or her department, and the SA/O program coordinator is located in the Office of Undergraduate Advising. 

Continuing Student Registration

Continuing student registration is the period during the fall and spring semesters when currently enrolled students should register. Degree Audit Reports (DARS) provide a compact summary of a student's progress toward a degree, including a list of requirements yet to be completed. Students obtain their DARS documents from the office of their major departments or the Office of Undergraduate Advising. 

Prior to processing their registrations, freshmen meet with advisers to review their DARS documents, discuss course selections for the upcoming semester and have their Personal Identification Numbers (PINS) activated. New transfer students and continuing students in good academic standing are encouraged to meet with their departmental advisers before processing their schedules via telephone registration or via OWLnet. Students ineligible to use telephone registration are required to meet with an adviser. 

Pre-professional Advising 

  • Students intending to pursue a degree in Pharmacy will reside in the College of Science and Technology. The curriculum and advising of these students are specifically tailored to fulfill the prerequisites set forth by the Temple University School of Pharmacy.
  • Many of the courses that Professional Programs require are incorporated into College of Science and Technology curricula.
  • This approach allows our students to fulfill degree requirements, while at the same time meeting admissions criteria for professional and graduate programs.
  • Knowledge gained in the College of Science and Technology curricula provides the foundation needed in preparing for Professional School entrance exams (MCAT, DAT, GRE, and others)
Early Admission to Professional Programs

Students in the College of Science and Technology who have been admitted to health-related professional schools at the end of their third year and have completed 90 semester hours, including all requirements of the College and of their majors with a cumulative GPA of at least 3.5, may petition the Dean for the transfer of their first year in professional study toward the completion of the requirements for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. 

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Requirements for the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) Degrees

The College of Science and Technology offers two undergraduate degrees, a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) or a Bachelor of Science (B.S.). The B.A. degree gives students a broad-based education, including the study of a foreign language. The B.S. degree is for those students who wish more specialized training in their chosen disciplines. 

Credit Hour Requirements

The College of Science and Technology requires that students complete a total of 123 credits. Of that total, 90 credits must be in the College of Science and Technology or the College of Liberal Arts (CLA). A course shall be classified as a College of Science and Technology or College of Liberal Arts course if it is offered by a department or program in either of the respective colleges--or if it is in the department of Economics. Of those 90 credits, 45 must be in upper level courses. Students receiving a Bachelor of Arts (as opposed to Bachelor of Science) degree must take two courses numbered 0100 or above in the College of Liberal Arts. 

Students must also satisfy the requirements of the University Core Curriculum program under which they entered. 

A student with an intercollegial or interdisciplinary studies major can obtain information concerning the minimum number of semester hours in College of Science and Technology or College of Liberal Arts courses required for graduation from his or her major adviser and from the description of the major found in this Bulletin. 

These credit hour requirements apply to students who matriculated during or after the fall semester 1995. 

A maximum of nine semester hours in preparatory courses (courses numbered 0001-0049) may be applied to any baccalaureate degree. Semester hours earned in Mathematics 0015 (formerly Math 0001), military science, and RCC-enhanced courses are not credited toward the minimum semester hours required for graduation. 

Bachelor of Science Requirements

Core. In addition to the requirements above, Bachelor of Science candidates must complete the University Core Curriculum in effect at the time of their matriculation. 

Major. They must also complete the requirements of a departmental major. It is important to note that students enter the College of Science and Technology as Bachelor of Arts majors.  If they wish to change their degree choice to Bachelor of Science, they must complete a declaration of major form in the Office of Undergraduate Advising.  B.S. majors are offered the following programs: 

Biochemistry 
Biology 
Biophysics 
Chemistry 
Computer and Information Sciences (CIS)

Environmental Studies
Geology 

Information Science and Technology
Mathematics 
Mathematics and Physics 
Physics 

Minor or Additional Specialization. Students pursuing a Bachelor of Science degree may also choose to fulfill the requirements of a second Major, Minor, or Additional Specialization. See below under Special Major and Minor Requirements.

Bachelor of Arts Requirements

Core. Bachelor of Arts candidates must complete the University Core requirements in effect at the time of their matriculation with the following difference: For the Core Language or International Studies requirement, candidates for the B.A. degree are required by the College to complete both an International Studies and a Language requirement by 

(a) completing the third semester of a language (course number C061, except in Critical Languages) and one international studies course

 or 

(b) completing the second semester of a language (course number 0052, except in Critical Languages) and two international studies courses, at least one of which must be "Third World/Non-Western." 

Upper level distribution requirements. B.A. students must complete upper level distribution requirements by taking two upper level courses in one or more departments of the College of Liberal Arts or the Department of Economics. 

Students who have double majors, one of which is in the College of  Liberal Arts or Economics, automatically satisfy the distribution requirement. 

Major. Bachelor of Arts candidates must complete the requirements of a major. The minimum acceptable grade in a course taken to fulfill major requirements is a C-.  B.A. majors are offered in the following programs: 

Biology 
Chemistry 
Computer and Information Sciences 
Earth Science (see Geology) 
Information Science and Technology
Mathematics 
Mathematical Economics 
Physics 

Placement Exams

All new freshmen must take diagnostic English and mathematics placement exams. Transfer students who have not completed English C050 or its equivalent are also required to take placement exams, and it is recommended that those who have not taken a calculus course do so also. The results of these exams determine if students are required to enroll in preparatory composition and mathematics courses. Students assigned to English 0040/0041 must register each semester for that course until the requirement is completed. Only upon successful completion of English 0040/0041 can such students enroll in English C050/C051. Students assigned to courses designed to remedy deficiencies in mathematics are required to complete those courses before enrolling in the mathematics component of the University Core. Incoming students must also take a foreign language placement examination if they plan to continue a language previously studied, or if they wish to place out of a foreign language requirement. 

Special Major and Minor Requirements

Interdisciplinary Studies Major. Rather than major in an existing department or program, students may apply for a major in Interdisciplinary Studies. The proposed major should consist of courses totaling at least 36 semester hours, and be justified in terms of some thematic unit of cohesive rationale. The program should not closely resemble any major currently available in the College of Science and Technology, or any other Temple University program. 

The proposed major program may include courses outside of the Colleges of Science and Technology and Liberal Arts, but at least 24 semester hours must be in upper level Science and Technology or Liberal Arts courses. The student's proposal must be sponsored by two faculty members from different departments, at least one from the College of Science and Technology. 

Approval for the program must be obtained from the Office of Undergraduate Advising prior to the initiation of the last 60 semester hours of the degree.

Honors Interdisciplinary Studies Major. Students in the University Honors Program may apply for a College of Science and Technology Honors Interdisciplinary Major. They must complete the degree requirements of the B.A. in the College of Science and Technology and the requirements for the Interdisciplinary Major described above as well as the requirements for the University Honors Program. Approval for this program must  be obtained from the College and the University Honors Committee prior to the initiation of the last 60 semester hours of the degree. 

In addition, the proposed Major Program should include submission of an acceptable Honors Thesis to the University Honors Steering Committee. 

Minor. Students may also choose to complete the requirements for a minor. The minimum acceptable grade in a course taken to fulfill minor requirements is C-. The minimum GPA for all CST minors is 2.0. This requirement is superseded in any specific minor program that requires some higher GPA. At least half of the courses taken by a student to fulfill the minor must be taken at Temple. Forms for declaring a minor are available in the following programs: 

Biology 
Cognitive Neuroscience (see Psychology) 
Computer and Information Sciences 
Mathematics 
Mathematical Economics
Physics 

Double Major. Students may complete a double major by fulfilling all requirements for both majors, including at least four discrete courses in each. 

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Program Descriptions

The following is information about programs and majors offered in the College of Science and Technology. Listed under each degree program are the courses students must successfully complete to earn that particular B.A. or B.S. degree. These required courses are in addition to the University Core Curriculum requirements and the College's requirements. See Core Curriculum and Requirements for the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) Degrees. 

Biochemistry
Biology 
Biophysics
Chemistry
Computer and Information Sciences
Environmental Studies
Information Science and Technology
Geology

Mathematics
Physics

Biochemistry

Dr. Frank Chang and Dr. Robert Stanley, Advisers 
(215) 204-8843/7916 

B.S. Major Requirements

The biochemistry degree consists of fundamental biology and chemistry courses plus biochemistry lecture and laboratory courses: Chemistry 0371 (Biochemistry - Structure and Function), Biology 0376/Chemistry 0372 (Biochemistry - Metabolism), and Biology 0344 (Research Techniques in Biochemistry). 

Freshman Year

1st Semester
Course # Course Title Semester Hours
Chemistry C071 or C081 or H091 General Chemistry or Chemical Science I or Honors General Chemistry 3
Chemistry C073 or C083 or H093 General Chemistry Lab or General Chemical Science Lab or Honors General Chemistry 1
Mathematics C085* or Mathematics H095 Calculus I or Honors Calculus I 4
                       Subtotal 8

2nd Semester

Chemistry C072 and C074 General Chemistry II 
or Chemistry C082 and C084 General Chemical Science II 
or Chemistry H092 and H094 Honors General Chemistry II 

Mathematics 0086 Calculus II
or Mathematics H096 Honors Calculus II*

*Mathematics C075 (Calculus with Applications I) and Mathematics 0076 (Calculus with Applications II) are acceptable but not preferred. 

Sophomore Year

1st Semester

Chemistry 0121 and 0123 Organic Chemistry 
or Chemistry 0181 and 0183 Organic Chemistry for Majors
or Chemistry H191 and H193 Honors Organic Chemistry

Biology 0103 Introduction to Biology 
or Biology H103 Honors Introduction to Biology

Physics 0121 General Physics I
or Physics C087 Elementary Classical Physics I 

2nd Semester

Chemistry 0122 and 0124 Organic Chemistry 
or Chemistry 0182 and 0184 Organic Chemistry for Majors
or Chemistry H192 and H194 Honors Organic Chemistry

Physics 0122 General Physics II,
or Physics C088 Elementary Classical Physics II 

Junior Year

1st Semester

Biology W204 Cell Structure and Function 
Chemistry 0213 Techniques of Chemical Measurement 
Chemistry 0231 Physical Chemistry Lecture 

2nd Semester

Biology 0203 Genetics 
Chemistry 0371 Biochemistry - Structure and Function 
Biochemistry electives ** 

Senior Year

1st Semester

Biology 0376 or Chemistry 0372 Biochemistry - Metabolism 
Biology 0324 Molecular Biology 
Biochemistry electives ** 

2nd Semester

Biology 0344 Research Techniques in Biochemistry 
Biochemistry electives ** 

** Biochemistry electives: Students are required to take three advanced biochemistry electives selected from the following list: 

Biology

0234 Mammalian Physiology 
0265 Embryology 
0317 General Microbiology 
0320 Human Genetics 
0325 Research Techniques in Molecular Biology 
0328 Virology
0330 Cell Biology
0352 Neurobiology 
0363 Genetic Control of Mammalian Development 
0364 Biochemical Embryology 
0367 Endocrinology
0370 Comparative Animal Physiology 
0371 Cell Proliferation 
0374 Physical Biochemistry 
0381 Membrane Biochemistry and Biophysics 
0385 Contemporary Biology 

Chemistry: 

W314 Techniques of Chemical Measurement II 
0232 Physical Chemistry II 
0301 Inorganic Chemistry 
0321 Advanced Organic Chemistry I 
0374 Physical Biochemistry 

Mathematics:

0127 Calculus III 

Other courses may be acceptable with the permission of one of the biochemistry advisers. 

Biology

Dr. Shepherd K. Roberts, Adviser 
(215) 204-8854 

B.A. Major Requirements

Freshman Year

1st Semester

Chemistry C071 and C073 General Chemistry 
or Chemistry C081 and C083 General Chemical Science I 
or Chemistry H091 and H093 Honors General Chemistry 

Mathematics C075 Calculus with Applications I
or Mathematics C085 Calculus I
or Mathematics H095 Honors Calculus I

2nd Semester

Chemistry C072 and C074 General Chemistry II 
or Chemistry C082 and C084 General Chemical Science II 
or Chemistry H092 and H094 Honors General Chemistry II 

Mathematics 0076 Calculus with Applications II
or Mathematics 0086 Calculus II 
or Mathematics H096 Honors Calculus II
 

Sophomore Year

1st Semester

Chemistry 0121 and 0123 Organic Chemistry 
or Chemistry 0181 and 0183 Organic Chemistry for Majors
or Chemistry H191 and H193 Honors Organic Chemistry

Biology 0103 Introduction to Biology I
or Biology H103 Honors Introduction to Biology I
 

2nd Semester

Chemistry 0122 and 0124 Organic Chemistry 
or Chemistry 0182 and 0184 Organic Chemistry for Majors
or Chemistry H192 and H194 Honors Organic Chemistry

Biology 0104 Introduction to Biology II 
or Biology H104 Honors Introduction to Biology II
 

Junior Year

1st Semester

Biology W204 Cell Structure and Function 

Physics 0121 General Physics I

2nd Semester

Biology 0203 Genetics 

Physics 0122 General Physics II,

Senior Year

1st Semester

Two biology electives above the 0204 level. 

2nd Semester

Two biology electives above the 0204 level.

If the student has taken the necessary prerequisite courses, some of the biology elective courses may be taken before the senior year. Graduate level courses, described in the Graduate Bulletin, are available with special permission. 

B.S. Major Requirements

Freshman Year

1st Semester

Chemistry C071 and C073 General Chemistry 
or Chemistry C081 and C083 General Chemical Science I 
or Chemistry H091 and H093 Honors General Chemistry 

Mathematics C075 Calculus with Applications I
or Mathematics C085 Calculus I
or Mathematics H095 Honors Calculus I

2nd Semester

Chemistry C072 and C074 General Chemistry II 
or Chemistry C082 and C084 General Chemical Science II 
or Chemistry H092 and H094 Honors General Chemistry II 

Mathematics 0076 Calculus with Applications II
or Mathematics 0086 Calculus II 
or Mathematics H096 Honors Calculus II
 

Sophomore Year

1st Semester

Chemistry 0121 and 0123 Organic Chemistry 
or Chemistry 0181 and 0183 Organic Chemistry for Majors
or Chemistry H191 and H193 Honors Organic Chemistry

Biology 0103 Introduction to Biology I
or Biology H103 Honors Introduction to Biology I
 

2nd Semester

Chemistry 0122 and 0124 Organic Chemistry 
or Chemistry 0182 and 0184 Organic Chemistry for Majors
or Chemistry H192 and H194 Honors Organic Chemistry

Biology 0104 Introduction to Biology II 
or Biology H104 Honors Introduction to Biology II
 

Junior Year

1st Semester

Biology W204 Cell Structure and Function 

Physics 0121 General Physics I

2nd Semester

Biology 0203 Genetics 

Physics 0122 General Physics II

Senior Year

1st Semester
Four biology electives above the 0204 level.*

2nd Semester
Three biology electives above the 0204 level.*

If the student has taken the necessary prerequisite courses, some of the Biology elective courses may be taken before the senior year. Graduate level courses, described in the Graduate Bulletin, are available with special permission. 

*Two elective courses may be taken from the following: Statistics 0278; Mathematics 0117 or 0127; Chemistry 0231 and 0232; Physics 0161 and 0221; Electrical Engineering Technology 0104 and 0176. 

Students interested in a specific area of biology may select their electives from one of the following areas: 1. Cell and Developmental Biology; 2. Genetics and Molecular Biology; 3. Neurobiology and Behavior; 4. Biology of Organisms. 

Students wishing a broader exposure to biology may choose electives from any of the areas. Additional information is available in the Biology Department Office or from biology advisers. 

Minor Requirements

Students interested in acquiring basic knowledge in biology but not wishing to major in the subject may pursue a minor by taking Biology 0103-0104 (Introduction to Biology) plus three biology electives at the 0200 level or above; At least one of these electives must be a course with laboratory. Biology 0203 (Genetics) and W204 (Cell Structure and Function) may be substituted for two of the three electives. (Minimum of 18 credits) 

Distinction in Major

Students interested in laboratory research are encouraged to participate in the Biology Research Program. Distinction in Biology is awarded on the basis of independent laboratory projects conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. Admission to the program is by application to the Biology Department during the first semester of the junior year. Completion of this Program will substitute for one Biology Elective course. 

Concentration in Neuroscience

Undergraduate students with an interest in Neuroscience are admitted to the Neuroscience Program after declaration of a major in biology or psychology. Upon successful completion of their departmental and Neuroscience Program requirements, students receive a bachelor's degree with a Specialization in Neuroscience. 

Neuroscience Program Requirements

1. Completion of  three Neuroscience courses with a grade of B or better. 
2. One year of Neuroscience research with a faculty member of the Neuroscience Program, with public and written presentation of the results. The written presentation must be approved by two faculty members in the Neuroscience Program. 

Undergraduate Neuroscience Courses

Biology:
0304 Neurophysiological Techniques 
0315 Behavioral and Neural Genetics 
0354 Neural Basis of Behavior 
0356 Organization and Development of the Nervous System 
0381 Membrane Biophysics and Biochemistry 

Communication Science
0235 Introduction to Neuroanatomy and Neurophysiology 

Philosophy:
0444 Philosophy of Mind 

Psychology:
0103 Brain-Behavior Relationships 
0104 Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience 
0275 Research Methods in Behavioral Neuroscience 
 

Elective Courses in Specific Areas 

Some electives are listed under two separate areas because their content is relevant to both. 

Information on courses added to or removed from the list of elective courses in specific areas is available from the Biology Department Office or from Biology advisers. 

Biology of Organisms

0227 Principles of Ecology 
0233 Mammalian Anatomy 
0234 Mammalian Physiology 
0235 Histology 
0236 Fresh Water Ecology 
0237 Marine Environments 
0241 Invertebrate Biology 
0245 Marine Biology 
0254 Animal Behavior 
0265 Embryology 
0310 Evolution 
0317 General Microbiology 
0367 Endocrinology 
0370 Comparative Animal Physiology 

Neurobiology and Behavior

0234 Mammalian Physiology 
0254 Animal Behavior 
0304 Research Techniques in Neurobiology 
0315 Behavioral and Neural Genetics 
0340 Advanced Invertebrate Biology 
0352 Neurobiology 
0354 Neurological Basis of Animal Behavior 
0356 Organization and Development of the Nervous System 

Cell and Developmental Biology

0235 Histology 
0265 Embryology 
0324 Molecular Biology 
0329 Developmental Genetics 
0330 Cell Biology 
0333 Advanced Techniques in Microscopy 
0340 Advanced Invertebrate Biology 
0356 Organization and Development of the Nervous System 
0363 Genetic Control of Mammalian Development 
0364 Biochemical Embryology 
0365 Mammalian Development 
0371 Cell Proliferation 
0381 Membrane Biophysics 
0384 Organogenesis 
0808 Electron Microscopy 

Genetics and Molecular Biology

0315 Behavioral and Neural Genetics 
0320 Human Genetics 
0324 Molecular Biology 
0325 Research Techniques in Molecular Biology 
0329 Developmental Genetics 
0330 Cell Biology 
0363 Genetic Control of Mammalian Development 
0365 Mammalian Development 
0374 Physical Biochemistry 
0375 Biochemistry I 
0376 Biochemistry II

Biophysics

Dr. Donald Neville, Adviser 
(215) 204-8479 

Freshman Year

1st Semester

Physics 0121 General Physics I
or Physics C087 Elementary Classical Physics I 

Mathematics C075 Calculus with Applications I
or Mathematics C085 Calculus I
or Mathematics H095 Honors Calculus I

2nd Semester

Physics 0122 General Physics II
or Physics C088 Elementary Classical Physics II 

Mathematics 0076 Calculus with Applications II
or Mathematics 0086 Calculus II 
or Mathematics H096 Honors Calculus II
 

Sophomore Year

1st Semester

Math 0117 Elementary Calculus with Applications III
or Math 0127 Calculus III

Chemistry C071 and C073 General Chemistry 
or Chemistry C081 and C083 General Chemical Science I 
or Chemistry H091 and H093 Honors General Chemistry 

Physics 0187 and 0187L Electricity and Magnetism with Lab

2nd Semester

Chemistry C072 and C074 General Chemistry II 
or Chemistry C082 and C084 General Chemical Science II 
or Chemistry H092 and H094 Honors General Chemistry II

Physics 0184 Mathematical Physics

Physics 0188 and 0188L Introduction to Modern Physics with Lab
 

Junior Year

1st Semester

Chemistry 0121 and 0123 Organic Chemistry 
or Chemistry 0181 and 0183 Organic Chemistry for Majors
or Chemistry H191 and H193 Honors Organic Chemistry

Biology 0103 Introduction to Biology I
or Biology H103 Honors Introduction to Biology I

Physics 231 Thermodynamics

2nd Semester

Chemistry 0122 and 0124 Organic Chemistry 
or Chemistry 0182 and 0184 Organic Chemistry for Majors
or Chemistry H192 and H194 Honors Organic Chemistry

One elective* 

Senior Year

1st Semester

Biology W204 Cell Structure and Function 

Two electives*

2nd Semester
Biology 0203 Genetics

One elective*

*Four courses, all at the 0200-level or above chosen from electives in Physics, Neurobiology, Physiology, Genetics, Cell Structure, Biophysics, Biochemistry, and Physical Chemistry. At least two of these elective courses must be in Physics. 

Biophysics majors who plan to do graduate Biophysics in a Physics department should choose Physics 0201, 0211, W215, and 0306; and should try to complete as much of the standard BS program in physics as time allows. 

Students planning to go to medical school should complete Biology 0104 (Introduction to Biology II). 

Chemistry

Dr. David Dalton, Director of Undergraduate Programs
(215) 204-7138 

All prospective majors should schedule an appointment with one of the Departmental Advisers to plan a program of study as early in their Temple careers as possible. The recommended order of courses is given below; a different order is acceptable as long as the student adheres to prerequisite requirements. 

With the appropriate selection of electives, the B.S. degree is accredited by the American Chemical Society*. 

B.A. Major Requirements

Freshman Year

1st Semester

Chemistry C071 and C073 General Chemistry I or
Chemistry C081 and C083 General Chemical Science I or
Chemistry H091 and H093 Honors General Chemistry 

Mathematics C085 Calculus or
Mathematics C075 Calculus with Applications I  or
Mathematics H095 Honors Calculus I 

2nd Semester

Chemistry C072 and C074 General Chemistry II or
Chemistry C082 and C084 General Chemical Science II or
Chemistry H092 and H094 Honors General Chemistry II 

Mathematics 0086 Calculus II or
Mathematics 0076 Calculus with Applications II or
Mathematics H096 Honors Calculus II 

Sophomore Year 

1st Semester

Chemistry 0121 and 0123 Organic Chemistry I or
Chemistry 0181 and 0183 Organic Chemistry for Majors I  or
Chemistry H191 and H193 Organic Chemistry for Honors I 

Mathematics 0127 Calculus III or
Mathematics 0117 Elementary Calculus with Applications III or
Mathematics 0251 Differential Equations or
CIS C071 Computer Programming in C

Physics C087 Elementary Classical Physics I or
Physics 0121 General Physics I 

2nd Semester

Chemistry 0122, 0124 Organic Chemistry II or
Chemistry 0182, 0184 Organic Chemistry for Majors II or
Chemistry H192, H194 Organic Chemistry for Honors II 
Chemistry 0129** Introduction To Chemistry Research Techniques 

Physics C088 Elementary Classical Physics II or
Physics 0122 General Physics II 

Junior Year 

1st Semester

Chemistry 0231 Physical Chemistry Lecture I 
Chemistry 0213 Techniques of Chemical Measurement I 

2nd Semester

Chemistry 0232 Physical Chemistry Lecture II 

Senior Year

1st Semester

Advanced Chemistry Course *** 

2nd Semester

Advanced Science Course **** 
Writing Capstone Course ***** 

B.S. Major Requirements

Freshman Year 

1st Semester

Chemistry C071 and C073 General Chemistry I or
Chemistry C081 and C083 General Chemical Science I or
Chemistry H091 and H093 Honors General Chemistry I 

Mathematics C085 Calculus I  or
Mathematics C075 Calculus with Applications I or
Mathematics H095 Honors Calculus I 

2nd Semester

Chemistry C072 and C074 General Chemistry II or
Chemistry C082 and C084 General Chemical Science II or
Chemistry H092 and  H094 Honors General Chemistry II 

Mathematics 0086 Calculus II or
Mathematics 0076 Calculus with Applications II or
Mathematics H096 Honors Calculus II 

Sophomore Year 

1st Semester

Chemistry 0121 and 0123 Organic Chemistry I or
Chemistry 0181 and 0183 Organic Chemistry for Majors I or
Chemistry H191 and H193 Organic Chemistry for Honors I 

Mathematics 0127 Calculus III 
or Mathematics 0117 Elementary Calculus with Applications III 
or Mathematics 0251 Differential Equations 
CIS C071 Computer Programming in C

Physics C087 Elementary Classical Physics I 
or Physics 0121 General Physics I 

2nd Semester

Chemistry 0122 and 0124 Organic Chemistry II or
Chemistry 0182 and 0184 Organic Chemistry for Majors II or
Chemistry H192 and H194 Organic Chemistry for Honors II 
Chemistry 0129 ** Introduction to Chemistry Research Techniques 

Physics C088 Elementary Classical Physics II or
Physics 0122 General Physics II 

Junior Year 

1st Semester

Chemistry 0231 Physical Chemistry Lecture I 
Chemistry 0213 Techniques of Chemical Measurement I 

2nd Semester

Chemistry 0232 Physical Chemistry Lecture II 
Chemistry W237 Physical Chemistry Laboratory 

Senior Year 

1st Semester

Chemistry 0301 Inorganic Chemistry 
Advanced Chemistry Course*** 
Advanced Science Course **** 

2nd Semester

Chemistry W314 Techniques of Chemical Measurement II 
Advanced Chemistry Course *** 
Advanced Science Course **** 


*In order for the B.S. degree to be accredited by the American Chemical Society, the student must take Chemistry 0371 (Biochemistry) and at least three of the following Chemistry courses from among the Advanced Chemistry and Advanced Science courses : 

Chemistry 0293 Undergraduate Research
Chemistry 0307 Inorganic Synthesis 
Chemistry 0308 Solid State Analysis
Chemistry 0313 Instrumental Design
Chemistry 0327 Advanced Organic Preparations and
Chemistry 0328 Qualitative Organic Analysis.

Although CIS C071 is acceptable as an option for the B.S. degree, one of the Calculus options (Mathematics 0117, 0127, or 0251) must be chosen if the degree is to be accredited by the ACS.

**Chemistry 0129 is a pre- or co-requisite for all laboratory courses numbered 0200 and above (i.e., courses numbered with last digit equal to 3, 4, 7, or 8). 

***Advanced Chemistry Courses consist of all courses in Chemistry having a number of 0301 or higher. If the student has successfully completed the appropriate prerequisite courses, graduate courses in Chemistry may be included in this category. 

****Advanced Science Courses consist of Chemistry 0283 or 0293 (only one of these may be counted as an advanced science course), and all other Chemistry courses numbered 0301 and above; Biology 0203, W204, 0220, 0234, 0265, and above; Physics 0183, 0184, 0187, 0188, 0201, 0202, 0211, 0221, 0231, and above; Geology 0200 and above; Math 0147, W205, 0233, 0247, and above (if Math 0251 has been selected as an option in place of Calculus III, it cannot count also as an Advanced Science course). 

*****Although neither Chemistry W237 or Chemistry W314 is required as part of the B.A. degree program, at least one of the two must be taken in order to satisfy the Core requirement for a capstone writing intensive course in the major. If Chemistry W237 is selected it may also count as the B.A. student's Advanced Science course; if Chemistry W314 is selected, it may count as the B.A. student's Advanced Chemistry or Advanced Science course. 

Five-year Master's Program

Chemistry majors in their junior year may apply for admission to the fifth year M.A. Program. Upon admission to the program and satisfactory completion of the program requirements, the student is assured of having a master's degree at the end of the fifth year. Interested students should contact their adviser for details. 

 

Computer and Information Sciences
 
 

Computer and Information Science
Dr. Billie Stevens, Advisor (215) 204-6439

Effective in the fall semester 2002, students are required to achieve an average grade of B- or better in the following set of courses: CIS 0066, CIS 0067, CIS 0068 and CIS 0072.  Students transferring credit for some of these courses, or students who have completed some of these courses prior to the fall semester 2002 are required to achieve the B- average only in those courses taken beginning with the fall semester 2002.

B.A. Major Requirements

Freshman Year

1st semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
Mathematics C085 Calculus I 4.0
or   Mathematics H095 Honors Calculus I  4.0
Subtotal 4.0
Laboratory Science A 4.0
Subtotal 4.0
Grand Total 8.0

2nd semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
Mathematics 0086 Calculus II 4.0
or Mathematics H096 Honors Calculus II  4.0
Subtotal 4.0
Laboratory Science B 4.0
Subtotal 4.0
Grand Total 8.0

Sophomore Year

1st semester
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
CIS 0067 Program Design and Abstraction 4.0
CIS 0066 Mathematical Concepts in Computing I 4.0
Subtotal 8.0
Grand Total 8.0

 

2nd semester
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
CIS 0068 Data Structures 4.0
CIS 0072 Computer Systems and Low-Level Programming  4.0
CIS 0166  Mathematical Concepts in Computing II 4.0
Subtotal 12.0
Grand Total 12.0

Junior Year

1st semester
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
CIS 0223 Data Structures and Algorithms 4.0
CIS 0207 Introduction to Systems Programming and Operating Systems 4.0
Subtotal 8.0
Grand Total 8.0

 
 

2nd semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
One theoretically oriented course chosen from :
Mathematics 0133, 0147 or 0233, 
Philosophy 0211, 
CIS 0211 or 0242.
3.0 or
4.0
Communication Course chosen from:
English W102, W104
Speech Communications 65
3.0
Subtotal 6.0 or
7.0
Grand Total 6.0 or
7.0

Senior Year

1st semester
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
CIS 0307 Operating Systems  4.0
Grand Total 4.0

 

2nd semester
 
Course #  Course Title S.H.
W338 Software Engineering  4.0
Grand Total 4.0

 
 
 

Computer and Information Science
B.S. Major Requirements

Freshman Year

1st semester
 
 
Mathematics C085 Calculus I  4.0
or Mathematics H095  Honors Calculus I  4.0
Subtotal 4.0
Laboratory Science A 4.0
Subtotal 4.0
Grand Total 8.0

 

2nd semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
Mathematics 0086 Calculus II  4.0
or Mathematics H096 Honors Calculus II  4.0
Subtotal 4.0
Laboratory Science B 4.0
Subtotal 4.0
Grand Total 8.0

 
 
 

Sophomore Year

1st semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
CIS 0067 Program Design and Abstraction 4.0
CIS 0066 Mathematical Concepts in Computing I 4.0
Subtotal 8.0
Grand Total 8.0

2nd semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
CIS 0068  Data Structures 4.0
CIS 0072 Computer Systems and Low-Level Programming  4.0
CIS 0166 Mathematical Concepts in Computing II 4.0
Subtotal 12.0
Grand Total 12.0

 
 

Junior Year

1st semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
CIS 0223 Data Structures and Algorithms 4.0
CIS 0207 Introduction to Systems Programming and Operating Systems 4.0
One theoretically oriented course chosen from :
Mathematics 0133, 
0147 or 0233, 
Philosophy 0211, 
CIS 0211 or 0242. 
3.0 or 4.0
Subtotal 11.0 or 12.0

 

2nd semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
CIS elective* 3.0 or  4.0
Subtotal 3.0 or 4.0
Communication Course chosen from:
English W102, W104
Speech Communications 65
3.0
Subtotal 3.0
Grand Total 6.0 or 7.0

 
 

Senior Year

1st semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
CIS 0307 Introduction to Distributed Systems and Networks 4.0
W338  Software Engineering  4.0
CIS elective* 3.0 or  4.0
Subtotal 11.0 or 12.0
Grand Total 11.0 or 12.0

 

2nd semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
CIS 0339  Projects in Computer Science  4.0
CIS elective* 3.0 or 4.0
Subtotal 7.0 or 8.0
Grand Total 7.0 or 8.0

 
 
 

*CIS electives: CIS 0203, 0211(if not taken as theory requirement), 0217, 0220, 0242(if not taken as theory requirement), 0272, 0288, 0305, 0308, 0320, 0331, 0345/0350 (cross listed), 0397, 0398.

Minor Requirements

Students desiring a minor in Computer and Information Science are required to satisfy the following: 

Mathematics  C085-0086 (Calculus) 
CIS 0066 (Mathematical Concepts in Computing I) or Mathematics 0141 (Basic Mathematical Concepts) 
CIS 0067 (Program Design and Abstraction) 
CIS 0068 (Data Structures) 
CIS 0072 (Computer Systems and Low-Level Programming) 
CIS 0166 (Mathematical Concepts in Computing II) or Mathematics 0205 (Modern Algebra) 
CIS 0207 (Introduction to Systems Programming and Operating Systems) 
CIS 0223 (Data Structures and Algorithms)
 

Information Science and Technology
Dr. Gary Baram, Advisor
(215)204-6847
 

B.A. Major Requirements

Freshman Year

1st semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
Math C073 College Algebra 4.0
Subtotal 4.0
Science A 4.0
Subtotal 4.0
Grand Total 8.0

2nd semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
Math C077 Differential & Integral Calculus 4.0
Subtotal 4.0
CIS C055 Computers and Applications [Science B] 4.0
CIS C081 Higher Level Languages 4.0
Subtotal 8.0
Grand Total 12.0

 

Sophomore Year

1st semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
Math 133 Probability and Statistics 3.0
Subtotal 3.0
CIS 0083 Object Oriented Programming 4.0
CIS 0109 Database & File Management 4.0
Subtotal 8.0
Grand Total 11.0

2nd semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
Math 0163 Sophomore Problem Solving 3.0
Subtotal 3.0
CIS 0209 Principles of Component-Based Software Development 4.0
CIS 0230 Operating Systems and Networking 4.0
Subtotal 8.0
Grand Total 11.0

 

Junior Year

1st semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
CIS 0309 Net-Centric Computing 4.0
CIS 0330 Client/Server Computing 4.0
Grand Total 8.0

2nd semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
CIS 0342 Network Programming using JAVA 4.0
Grand Total 4.0

 

Senior Year

1st semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
CIS W281 Information Systems Analysis and Design 4.0
Grand Total 4.0

 

2nd semester
 
 
Course # Course Title S.H.
CIS W381 Information System Implementation 4.0
Grand Total 4.0

B.S. Major Requirements for Information Science and Technology are the same as the B.A. Major Requirements with the addition of 4 IS&T related elective courses from any department** (two each in the junior and senior year).

**IS&T related elective courses:  need to be selected with the approval of the IS&T advisor.

Minor Requirements

Students desiring a minor in Information Science and Technology are required to satisfy the following:

CIS C081 (Higher Level Languages)
CIS 0083 (Object Oriented Programming)
CIS 0109 (Database & File Management)
CIS 0209 (Principles of Component -Based Software Development)
CIS 0230 (Operating Systems & Networking)
CIS W281 (Information Systems Analysis and Design)
CIS W381 (Information System Implementation)
 

Environmental Studies

Dr. Robert J. Mason, Director 
(215) 204-5918 
rmason@nimbus.temple.edu
Website: http://www.temple.edu/env-stud 

Students will be equipped with the scholarly background and intellectual skills to understand a wide range of pressing environmental issues, and they will come to appreciate the physical, economic, political, demographic, and ethical factors that define those issues. Among the many environmental problems central to our program are groundwater contamination, suburban sprawl, river basin management, environmental justice and the greening of abandoned urban spaces. 

Offered jointly by the College of Liberal Arts and College of Science and Technology, Environmental Studies includes both B.A. and B.S. options. A Minor also is offered and a Certificate of Completion is an option for those already holding an undergraduate degree in a different field. 

The program and its requirements are described in full in the "Intercollegial Programs" section of this Bulletin.
 

Geology

Dr. Jonathan Nyquist, Adviser 
(215) 204-7484 

The Department of Geology offers two different undergraduate programs, one leading to the B.S. in Geology and the other leading to the B.A. in Earth Science. 

The B.S. program prepares students for immediate entry into a career in geology or for graduate studies. Career opportunities for geologists in industry and government include environmental planning, evaluation of waste disposal sites, groundwater monitoring, and exploration for natural resources. The B.S. program is excellent preparation for graduate study and ultimately for a career in research, teaching, industry, or government. 

The B.A. program is not intended for prospective geologists, but for liberal arts students who wish to concentrate in geology. The B.A. program is suitable for pre-medicine or pre-law students, or for students planning to teach earth science in secondary school. 

Note: A departmental field trip for undergraduates, graduates, and faculty will be conducted during the fall semester

B.A. in Earth Science

The following table lists fall or spring courses recommended for first-year students taking the degree of B.A. in Earth Science, Department of Geology, Temple University.

Geol. C050 (Science A)

Introduction to Geology

4

Math C055 or C075/85

College Math or Calculus I

4

Chem. C061/3 or 71/3

Intro. To Chemistry or General Chemistry

4

 

 

 

 

Subtotal

12

The following table lists  fall courses at the foundational level for the B.A. in Earth Science.  Choose three of the following five courses offered in the fall and spring.

Geol. 201

Mineralogy

(4)

Geol. 210

Introduction to Hydrology

(4)

Geol. 211

Facies Models

(4)

 

 

 

The following table lists the spring courses at the foundational level in the major for the B.A, in Earth Science.

Geol. 212

Paleontology & Stratigraphy

(4)

Geol. 261

Introduction to Geochemistry

(4)

 

 

 

 

Subtotal based on 3 of 5 courses

12

     

Geol.  W381 or H391  

Environmental Seminar

3

The following table lists  fall courses recommended for advancing students in the major for the B.A. in Earth Science.

Choose five courses from the following list that includes fall and spring.  Choose no more than three from one department.  Three courses must be numbered above 100.

Anthropology 124

Fundamentals of Archeology

3

Biology 83

General Biology I

4

Chem. 62/4 or 72/4

Intro to Chemistry or General Chemistry I

4

Chem. 121/3

Organic Chemistry I

4

GUS 260

Fundamentals of Cartography

3

GUS 262

Fundamentals of GIS

3

Phys. 87

Elem. Classical Physics

4

Phys. 121

Gen. Physics I

4

 

Subtotal

below

Continuation of table: spring courses recommended for advancing students in the major for the B.A. in Earth Science.

Chem. 122/4

Organic Chemistry II

4

Phys. 88

Elem. Classical Physics

4

Phys. 122

Gen. Physics II

4

 

 

 

 

Subtotal

17 to 20

Grand Total        44 to 47 S.H. 

B.S. in Geology

The following table lists  fall or spring courses recommended for first-year students for the degree of B.S. in Geology, Department of Geology, Temple University.

Geol. C050 (Science A)

Introduction to Geology

4

Math C075, C076

Calculus I, II

8

Chem. C071/3, C072/4

General Chemistry I, II

8

Phys. C087 or 121, C088 or 122

Elementary Classical Physics  I, II or General Phy. I, II

8

 

 

 

 

Subtotal

28

The following tables list fall, spring and summer foundational courses for the B.S. in Geology. Choose three of the following five courses. Fall term:

Geol. 201

Mineralogy

4

Geol. 211

Facies Models

4

 

 

 

 

Subtotal

8

Spring term:

Geol. 212

Paleontology & Stratigraphy

4

Geol. 261

Introduction to Geochemistry

4

 

 

 

 

Subtotal

8

Summer term:

Geol. 352

Field Geology (see Adviser)

4-6

 

 

 

 

Subtotal

4-6

The following table lists fall courses recommended for students advancing in the major for the degree of B.S. in Geology.

Geol. 301

Igneous & Meta. Petrology

4

Geol. 210

Intro. To Hydrology or  (Elective*)

4 or *3-4

Geol 310

Microcomputers in Geology or (Elective*)

4 or *3-4

 

 

 

 

Subtotal

8-12

The following table lists the  Spring Courses recommended for students advancing in the major for the B.S. in Geology.

Geol. 212

Paleontology & Stratigraphy

4

Geol. W302

Structural Geology

4

Upper level Sci or Math

Elective*

(3 or 4)

Upper level Sci or Math

Elective*

(3 or 4)

 

Subtotal

12-16

                                                                        Grand Total                  68-78

*Of the three upper level Science/Math electives required at least one must be in a discipline other than Geology.  One may be from the graduate level with permission of the instructor. 

  

Senior Research Project

Students whose cumulative GPA is at least 3.25 at the end of the first semester of their junior year are eligible to undertake a senior research project. In the second semester of their junior year, students must select a faculty research adviser and, with the adviser, prepare a written research proposal. After approval of the proposal by the research adviser and the Chair of the Undergraduate Committee of the Department, the student may register for three hours of Geology 0293-0294 (Individual Study Program), in the summer and each semester of the senior year (up to a total of nine hours), to carry out the research project. Normally, the project will involve field or laboratory work in the summer between the junior and senior years and lead to presentation of the results at a departmental seminar at the end of the senior year. 

Distinction in Major

To graduate with Distinction in Major, students are required to achieve a 3.5 GPA for the aggregate of courses required for the B.S. in Geology or the B.A. in Earth Science.

 

 

Mathematics

Dr. Boris Datskovsky, Director of Undergraduate Studies 
(215) 204-7847 
ugrd@math.temple.edu

Mathematics majors may select either the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) program or the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) program.

The B.A. program is a traditional program in pure mathematics. It is intended for students who plan to go to graduate school or to teach mathematics at a college or high school level after graduation. While the B.A. program has relatively few required courses, the required courses are academically demanding. The lack of heavy requirements should also provide students with an opportunity to explore their interests in and out of mathematics.

The B.S. program, which has more required courses, has an applied flavor. It is intended for students who plan to seek employment in a mathematics-related field or join a graduate program in applied mathematics or a mathematics-related field upon graduation.

Both  programs can be combined with the department's M.A. program, leading to the M.A. degree after five years of study. 

The department offers a joint program with the Department of Physics leading to the B.S. degree, and a joint program with the Department of Economics leading to the B.A. degree.   Students who plan careers as secondary school mathematics teachers may choose to take a five year interdisciplinary program, offered jointly with the College of Education, that leads to a bachelor's degree in mathematics, teaching certification, and a Master's degree in Education.
 

B.A. Major Requirements

Freshman Year

1st semester

Math C085 Calculus I  or  Math H095 Honors Calculus I

 4 s.h.

Programming Course chosen from: CIS 0067, 0068 or C071

 3-4 s.h.

2nd semester

Math 0086 Calculus II or Math H096 Honors Calculus II

 4 s.h.

Sophomore Year

1st semester

Math 0127

 Calculus III

4 s.h.

Math W141

Basic Mathematical Concepts (provided W141 is taken 

prior to W205 and 0247)
OR
one Math course numbered 0200 or above

 3 s.h.

2nd semester

Math 0147

  Linear Algebra

 3 s.h.

Math 0251

  Differential Equations

 3 s.h.

Junior Year

1st semester

Math W205

  Modern Algebra

 3 s.h.

Math 0247

  Advanced Calculus I

 3 s.h

2nd semester

Math 0248

  Advanced Calculus II

 3 s.h.

Math 0305

  Topics in Modern Algebra

 3  s.h.

Senior Year

1st semester

Math 0347 Introduction to Functions of Complex Variable

3 s.h.

One math course numbered 0200 or above

3-4  s.h.

2nd semester

Math W363 Problem Solving Seminar

3 s.h.

Math 0365 Topology  OR  Math 0377 Differential Geometry

3 s.h.

 

B.S. Major Requirements

Freshman Year

1st semester

Math C085 Calculus I or Math H095 Honors Calculus I

4 s.h.

Programming Course chosen from: CIS 0067, 0068 or C071

3-4 s.h.

Physics C087 Elementary Classical Physics I

4 s.h. 


2nd semester

Math 0086 Calculus II or Math H096 Honors Calculus II

4 s.h.

Physics C088 Elementary Classical Physics II  or

Programming Course chosen from: CIS 0067, 0068 or C071

3-4 s.h. 

Sophomore Year

1st semester

Math 0127 Calculus III

4 s.h.

Math W141 Basic Mathematical Concepts or 
Math W205 Modern Algebra

3 s.h.

Math 0233 Introduction to Probability

3 s.h.

2nd semester

Math 0148 Linear Algebra with Lab

4 s.h.

Math 0251 Differential Equations

3 s.h.

Junior Year

1st semester

Math 0253 Numerical Analysis

3-4 s.h.

Math 0247 Advanced Calculus I

3 s.h.

2nd semester

Math 0248 Advanced Calculus II

3 s.h.

One Math course numbered 0200 or above 

or chosen from: Actuarial Science 0305, 0306

or Chemistry 0231, 0232

or CIS 0211, 0242

or Economics 0241

or Physics 0187, 0188, 0201, 0202, 0211, 0231, 0306

3-4 s.h.

Senior Year

1st semester

Math 0347 Introduction to Functions of Complex Variable

3 s.h.

One Math course numbered 0200 or above 

or chosen from: Actuarial Science 0305, 0306

or Chemistry 0231, 0232

or CIS 0211, 0242

or Economics 0241

or Physics 0187, 0188, 0201, 0202, 0211, 0231, 0306

3-4 s.h.

2nd semester

Math W363 Problem Solving Seminar

3 s.h.

One math course numbered 0300 or above

1-4 s.h.


 

Interdisciplinary B.S. Degree in Mathematics and Physics

Dr. Donald E. Neville, Undergraduate Majors Advisor, Physics
(215) 204-8479 

Dr. Boris Datskovsky, Director of Undergraduate Studies 
(215) 204-7847 
ugrd@math.temple.edu

Freshman Year

1st semester

Math C085 Calculus I or Math H095 Honors Calculus I

4 s.h.

Physics C087 Elementary Classical Physics I 
or Physics 0121 General Physics I

4 s.h.

2nd semester

Math 0086 Calculus II or Math H096 Honors Calculus II

4 s.h.

Physics C088 Elementary Classical Physics II 
or Physics 0122 General Physics II

4 s.h.

Sophomore Year

1st semester

Math 0127 Calculus III

4 s.h.

Math W141 Basic Mathematical Concepts

3 s.h.

Physics 0171 Optics

3 s.h.

Physics 0187 and 0187L Electricity and Magnetism with Lab

4 s.h.

2nd semester

Physics 0184 Mathematical Physics or
Math 0351 Partial Differential Equations

3-4 s.h.

Physics 0188 and 0188L Introduction to Modern Physics with Lab

4 s.h.

Math 0251 Differential Equations

3 s.h.

Math 0233 Introduction to Probability

3 s.h.

Junior Year

1st semester

Math 0147 Linear Algebra or Math 0148 Linear Algebra with Lab

3-4 s.h.

Math W205 Modern Algebra

3 s.h.

Math 0247 Advanced Calculus I

3 s.h.

Physics 0201 Mechanics

3 s.h.

2nd semester

Physics 0231 Thermodynamics

3 s.h.

Physics 0211 Electromagnetism

3 s.h.

Physics 0161 Computing for Scientists

3 s.h.

Math 0248 Advanced Calculus II

3 s.h.

Senior Year

1st semester


Math 0347 Complex Analysis

3 s.h.

Physics W215 Advanced Laboratory

3 s.h.

Physics 0202 Analytical Mechanics

3 s.h.

Math 0253 Numerical Analysis I 

3-4 s.h.

2nd semester

Physics 0306 Quantum Mechanics

3 s.h.

 

The interdisciplinary program is administered jointly by the departments of Mathematics and Physics.  For further discussion of the Interdisciplinary major, see http://www.temple.edu/physics/undergradprog.html under "dual program in physics and mathematics." 
 
 The Combined B.S./M.A. Program

To participate in this five-year program, a Mathematics major should be enrolled in either the B.A. or the  B.S. program. Application to continue in the M.A. program must be  made to the Graduate Chair of the department no later than the first semester of the senior year.  To be accepted by the M.A. program, a student must have a GPA of at least 3.25 in Mathematics courses when the application is made.  In addition to completing the B.A. or B.S. requirements, the student must complete four additional graduate level mathematics courses (numbered 400 and above) by the end of her/his senior year.  If the Core and College requirements have also been met, the student will be awarded the B.A. or B.S. degree at the conclusion of this portion of the program.  All courses must be passed with a grade of C- or better, and no more than two graduate courses can carry a grade less than B- for the student to continue with the M.A. portion of the program. 
 

Fifth Year Course Requirements

The student will take a total of six graduate level courses, selected to conform to the M.A. requirements.  At the end of the fifth year, the student must either write and defend a master's thesis or pass one of the following examinations: 
Master's Comprehensive Examination in Pure Mathematics 
Master's Comprehensive Examination in Applied Mathematics 
Ph.D. Combined Comprehensive Examination (M.A. level pass) 

For further details on the M.A. degree requirement see the Graduate Bulletin

Minor Requirements

Three semesters of calculus (Mathematics C085, 0086, and 0127). 
One semester of computer programming (Computer and Information Sciences 0067 or 0068 or C071 or Physics 0161). 
Linear algebra (Math 0147) or Linear Algebra with Lab (Math 0148). 
Five additional mathematics courses numbered 0200 or above; or Mathematics W141 and four mathematics courses numbered 0200 or above. 

Distinction in Mathematics

A student who wishes to graduate with Distinction in Mathematics should apply to the Director of Undergraduate Studies no later than the second semester of the junior year. The following requirements must be met: 

1. All requirements for the B.A. or B.S. degree in Mathematics must be met with a GPA of at least 3.50 in the Mathematics courses. 
2. At the time of graduation, the student's overall GPA, including all college level courses must be at least 3.25. 
3. The student must either give a 30 minute talk to the Society of Undergraduate Mathematics (SUM)- with an audience including at least three faculty members - on a topic not part of his or her course of study; or pass a graduate course numbered 0500 or above with a grade of at least B-, and have the instructor of that course write a supporting letter. If the first option is selected, the faculty attending the talk should reach consensus on whether or not the talk merits distinction, and inform the Director of Undergraduate Studies of their decision; and in the case of the second option, the instructor of the graduate course should communicate a verbal evaluation of the student's performance to the Director of Undergraduate Studies. 
4. The Mathematics Department Executive committee will review all applications for graduation with Distinction in Mathematics, and forward its recommendations to the Dean of the College of Science and Technology. 

 

Physics

Dr. Donald Neville, Adviser 
(215) 204-8479 

The Physics Department offers B.A. and B.S. degree programs, both of which provide excellent preparation for graduate studies. The B.S. program provides for a broadening of the more applied aspects of a student's training and is recommended particularly for those intending to enter industry with a bachelor's degree. Both the B.S. and the B.A. program are an option for those planning careers in the medical or life sciences. 

B.A. Major Requirements
 

Freshman Year

1st semester

Math C085 Calculus I
or Math H095 Honors Calculus I

Physics C087 Elementary Classical Physics I 
or Physics 0121 General Physics I 

2nd semester

Math C086 Calculus II
or Math H096 Honors Calculus II

Physics C088 Elementary Classical Physics II 
or Physics 0122 General Physics II 
 

Sophomore Year

1st semester

Math 0127 Calculus III
Physics 0171 Optics
Physics 0187 and 0187L Electricity and Magnetism with Lab

2nd semester

Physics 0188 and 0188L Introduction to Modern Physics with Lab
Physics 0184 Mathematical Physics

Junior Year

1st semester


Physics 0231 Thermodynamics and Kinetic Theory

2nd semester

Physics 0201 Mechanics
Physics 0211 Electromagnetism

Senior Year

1st semester

Physics 0221 Electronics
or Physics 0161 Computing for Scientists
or Physics 0306 Quantum Mechanics
Physics 0202 Analytical Mechanics

2nd semester

Physics W215 Experimental Physics

Students planning to go to graduate school in Physics are strongly urged to take Physics 0306 and Physics 0321 or 0341. 

BS Major Requirements

Freshman Year

1st semester

Math C085 Calculus I
or Math H095 Honors Calculus I

Physics C087 Elementary Classical Physics I 
or Physics 0121 General Physics I 

2nd semester

Math 0086 Calculus II
or Math H096 Honors Calculus II

Physics C088 Elementary Classical Physics II 
or Physics 0122 General Physics II 
 

Sophomore Year

1st semester

Math 0127 Calculus III
Physics 0171 Optics
Physics 0187 and 0187L Electricity and Magnetism with Lab

2nd semester

Physics 0188 and 0188L Introduction to Modern Physics with Lab
Physics 0184 Mathematical Physics
Math 0251 Differential Equations
 

Junior Year

1st semester

Physics 0231 Thermodynamics
Physics 0161 Computing for Scientists

2nd semester

Physics 0201 Mechanics
Physics 0211 Electromagnetism

Students take two courses in biology, chemistry, engineering, geology, mathematics or advanced physics chosen in consultation with an adviser.

Senior Year

1st semester

Physics 0306 Quantum Mechanics
Physics 0202 Mechanics

2nd semester

Physics W215 Experimental Physics

Two courses chosen from:
Physics 0221 Electronics
Physics 0321 Solid State Physics
Physics 0341 Introduction to Atomic, Nuclear, and Particle Physics
 
 
 BS Major Requirements: Applied Physics Track

Core Requirements are those appropriate for the B.S. degree.

Mathematics

Math C085-0086-0127  Calculus I-II-III
One additional math course, chosen from Math 0251 (ordinary differential 
equations).

Physics

Physics C087-C088 Classical Physics I-II
Physics 0161 Computing for Scientists
Physics 0184 Mathematical Physics
Physics 0187 Electricity and Magnetism
Physics 0188 Modern Physics
Physics 0201 Classical Mechanics
Physics 0231 Thermodynamics
Physics W215 Experimental Physics [Junior Lab]
Physics 0306 Quantum Mechanics

Electrical Engineering

EE 0256/0257 Digital Circuit Design I/Lab
EE 0235 Microprocessors

For further information consult the physics major advisor, Dr. Donald E. Neville, 
(215) 204-8479

Suggested /Possible Sample Schedule:

Freshman

1st Semester
Physics C087 (or 0121)
Math C085 (or H095)

2nd Semester
Physics C088 (or 0122)
Math 0086 (or H096)

Sophomore

1st Semester
Math 0127
Physics 0161
Physics 0187/0187(Lab)

2nd Semester
Math 0251 or Math 0147
Physics 0188/0188(Lab)
Physics 0184

Junior

1st Semester
EE 0256/0257(Lab)
Physics 0231

2nd Semester
EE 0235
Physics 0201

Two additional physics courses at the 100 level or above, chosen with the 
consent of the physics adviser. Students planning to go on to graduate school are 
strongly urged to take Physics 0211 (Electromagnetism) and Physics 0202 or 0321 or 0341.

One additional EE course, chosen from EE 0335 (Advanced Microprocessors), 
EE 0254/0255 (Electronics/Lab), or EE 0355 (Microelectronics).

Senior

1st Semester
Physics 0306

2nd Semester
Physics W215

Minor Requirements

Students wishing to minor in Physics should take eight semester hours of introductory Physics with laboratory (Physics C087-C088 or equivalent), Electricity and Magnetism with laboratory (Physics 0187 and 0187L) or Introduction to Electromagnetic Fields and Waves (Electrical Engineering 0220), Introduction to Modern Physics with laboratory (Physics 0188 and 0188L), and six additional semester hours of Physics courses at or above the 0100 level, chosen with the approval of the Undergraduate Physics Adviser. 

Minors in Electrical and Mechanical Science

These minors are designed for Physics majors considering graduate work in Electrical or Mechanical Engineering, or exploring career opportunities in branches of Engineering close to Physics. The student must maintain a GPA of 2.5 or better in these minors. Students who are interested in Engineering/Applied Physics but do not have time for a full minor should nevertheless review these minors and consult with the Physics Adviser about the possibility of taking courses in Engineering. Since Physics and Engineering Core Curricula overlap significantly, often a Physics major can learn an interesting Engineering specialty by taking a relatively modest number of courses. 

Requirements for the Electrical Science Minor are: EE 0161, EE 0165, EE 0210, plus a minimum of nine semester hours of 0200 and 0300 level electives, chosen in consultation with an adviser in the Electrical Engineering Department. (The labs for Engineering 0163 and EE 0165 largely duplicate labs for Physics 0187 and Physics 0221 and are not required.) The following example elective sequence emphasizes solid state devices and might be of particular interest to a Physics major: EE 0254/0255 and EE 0256/0257. 

Requirements for the Mechanical Science Minor are: Engineering 0134 or 0131, Engineering 0133, Engineering 0234, ME 0231, plus a minimum of nine semester hours of electives. The elective courses can follow one of three tracks. The Thermodynamics and Combustion track comprises ME 0154, 0371, 0381, and 0372. The Electro-Mechanical Systems and Control track comprises EE 0063 and 0066, ME 0221, and ME 0322 or Engineering 0382. The Computer Aided Manufacturing track comprises Engineering 0310, ME 0375, and MET 0152. 

Five-year Master's Program

This program allows a talented student to obtain both a bachelor's and a master's degree in five years. A physics major may apply for the program during the junior or senior year. Please consult the adviser for details. 

Distinction in Major

A student who wishes to graduate with distinction in the major must complete all courses required for the physics major with a GPA of 3.5 or better and carry out an independent study or undergraduate thesis project. Consult the Undergraduate Physics Adviser for more details.

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Faculty

Administration 

Chris D. Platsoucas, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Dean 
Bruce P. Conrad, Ph.D., University of California, Senior Associate Dean 
Eric Grinberg, Ph.D., Harvard University, Associate Dean 
Mia K. Luehrman, Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana  Associate Dean 

Biology

PROFESSOR 

Shohreh Amini, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Frank N. Chang, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Antonio Giordano, M.D. University of Naples; Ph.D., Univ. of  Trieste.
Edward Gruberg, Ph.D., University of Illinois. 
Nina Hillman, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Ralph Hillman, Ph.D., Yale University. 
Kamel Khalili, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Richard L. Miller, Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Michael I. Mote, Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles. 
Stuart E. Neff, Ph.D., Cornell University. 
Harry P. Rappaport, Ph.D., Yale University. 
Jay Rappaport, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania 
Shepherd K. Roberts, Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Joel B. Sheffield, Chair, Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
George Tusynski, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania
Richard C. Weisenberg, Ph.D., University of Chicago. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 
Karen Palter, Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Robert W. Sanders
, Ph.D., University of Georgia. 
Tomasz Skorski, M.D., Ph.D., Medical Academy of Warsaw, Poland 
Jacqueline Tanaka, Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana 
Richard Waring, Ph.D., Essex University, England. 
 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 

Thomas E. Hanson, Ph.D., Michigan State University. 
Ee Lin Lim, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology 
Jose A. Ramirez-Latorre, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley. 

Chemistry

PROFESSOR 

David R. Dalton, Ph.D., University of California. 
Franklin A. Davis, Ph.D., Syracuse University. 
Antonio M. Ponte Goncalves, Ph.D., University of Chicago. 
Grant R. Krow, Ph.D., Princeton University.
Scott Sieburth, Ph.D., Harvard University.
Francis C. Spano, Ph.D., Princeton University. 
Daniel R. Strongin, Ph.D., Washington University.  
John R. Williams, Ph.D., University of Western Australia. 
Stephanie L. Wunder, Ph.D., University of Massachusetts. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

James L. Bloomer, Ph.D., University of London. 
Susan Ann Jansen-Varnum, Ph.D., University of Missouri, St. Louis 
Jerome Schiffer, Ph.D., Princeton University.
Robert J. Stanley, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University. 
Donald D. Titus, Ph.D., California Institute of Technology. 
Stephen S. Washburne, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

 

Computer and Information Sciences

PROFESSOR 

Robert M. Aiken, Ph.D., Northwestern University.
Richard Beigel, Ph.D., Stanford University.
Frank L. Friedman, Chair, Ph.D., Purdue University. 
Leonard J. Garrett, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.
Elliot B. Koffman, Ph.D., Case Western Reserve University. 
James F. Korsh, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Eugene Kwatny, Ph.D., Drexel University. 
David Lefkovitz, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
John T. Nosek, Ph.D., Temple University.
Zoran Obradovic, Ph.D., Pennsylvania State University.
Arthur T. Poe, Ph.D., University of Illinois. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

Giora Baram, Ph.D., University of Toledo. 
Giorgio Ingargiola, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Charles A. Kapps, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania.
Longin Jan Latecki, Ph.D., University of Hamburg. 
Paul LaFollette, M.D., Temple University. 
Yuan Shi, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Robert L. Stafford, Ph.D., Yale University. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 
 

Phillip Conrad, Ph.D., University of Delaware. 
Wenfei Fan, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Vasilis Megalooikonomou, Ph.D., University of Maryland.
Slobodan Vucetic, Ph.D., University of Washington.

Geology

PROFESSOR 

Edwin J. Anderson, Ph.D., Brown University. 
David E. Grandstaff, Ph.D., Princeton University. 
George H. Myer, Chair, Ph.D., Yale University. 
Gene C. Ulmer, Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

Jonathan Nyquist, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Laura Toran, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

Dennis O. Terry, Jr., Ph.D., University of Nebraska 

Mathematics

PROFESSOR 
Shiferaw Berhanu, Ph.D., Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey. 
Orin Chein, Ph.D., New York University. 
Boris Datskovsky, Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Leon Ehrenpreis, Ph.D., Columbia University. 
Janos Galambos, Ph.D., Eotvos University, Budapest, Hungary. 
Eric Grinberg, Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Cristian Gutierrez, Ph.D., University of Buenos Aires, Argentina. 
Omar Hijab, Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
David R. Hill, Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 
Marvin I. Knopp, Ph.D., University of Illinois.
Edward Letzter, Ph.D. University of Washington. 
Seymour Lipschutz, Ph.D., New York University. 
Martin Lorenz, Ph.D., University of Essen. 
Jatinder S. Mehta, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
Gerardo Mendoza, Ph.D., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Eli A. Passow, Ph.D., Yeshiva University. 
John Paulos, Ph.D., University of Wisconsin. 
K. Raghunandanan, Ph.D., Colorado State University. 
Louis Raymon, Ph.D., Yeshiva University. 
Igor Rivin, Ph.D., Princeton University 
Ranganathan Srinivasan, Ph.D., Wayne State University. 
Daniel B. Szyld, Ph.D., New York University. 
Georgia Triantafillou, Ph.D., University of Bonn, Germany. 
Simeon Vishik, Ph.D., Moscow State University. 
Wei-Shih Yang, Ph.D., Cornell University. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

Francis T. Christoph, Jr., Ph.D., Rutgers, The State University. 
Bruce P. Conrad, Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Raymond F. Coughlin, Ph.D., Illinois Institute of Technology.
Yury Grabovsky, Ph.D., New York University 
Diane Laison, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 
Nicholas Macri, Ph.D., Temple University. 
William D. Nathan, Ph.D., Syracuse University. 
Daniel Reich, Ph.D., Princeton University.
Sinai Robins, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles 
John J. Schiller, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, Chair.
H. Frank Thornton, M.A., Princeton University.
David E. Zitarelli, Ph.D., The Pennsylvania State University.  

ASSISTANT PROFESSOR 

Richard C. Glaeser, Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. 

Physics

PROFESSOR 
Leonard B. Auerbach, Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Theodore W. Burkhardt, Ph.D., Stanford University. 
Leroy W. Dubeck, Ph.D., Rutgers University. 
Dieter Forster, Ph.D., Harvard University. 
Zameer Hasan, Ph.D., Australian National University, Canberra.
Robert L. Intemann
, Ph.D., Stevens Institute of Technology. 
A. Marjatta Lyyra, Ph.D., University of Stockholm. 
C. Jeffrey Martoff, Ph.D., University of California at Berkeley. 
Zein-Eddine Meziani, Ph.D., University of Paris XI. 
Ted W. Mihalisin, Ph.D., University of Rochester. 
Donald E. Neville, Ph.D., University of Chicago.
Peter S. Riseborough, Ph.D., Imperial College London.
Raza A. Tahir-Kheli, Ph.D., Oxford University.
Rongjia Tao, Ph.D., Columbia University. 

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR 

Zbigniew Dziembowski, Ph.D., Warsaw University. 
Edward T. Gawlinski, Ph.D., Boston University, Chair. 
James S. Karra, Ph.D., Rutgers, The State Univ. of New Jersey. (Retired.) 
Chyan-Long Lin, Ph.D., Temple University. 
Tan Yuen, Ph.D., Temple University. 

Emeritus Faculty 

PROFESSOR

Dorothy Berner
William Brinigar
Barbara Brownstein
Ivan N. Erdelyi
Sarah Evangelista

Belmont G. Farley
James L. Framo
Jerrold Franklin
Robert Gordon
Seymour Haber

Peter Hagis, Jr.
William Harvey
Peter Havas
S. Robert Hilfer

Shoon K. Kim
V.S. Krishnan
Mortimer M. Labes

Sigurd Y. Larsen
Mael A. Melvin
Bernard Meth
Theodore Mitchell
Leonard Muldawer
Donald Newman
Mann-Chiang Niu
Elmer L. Offenbacher
Hala Pflugfelder
Thomas R. Punnett
Robert Salomon
Albert E. Schild
William Schmitt
Robert Searls
Richard M. Stavseth
Leon Steinberg
Stephen T. Takats
Robert B. Weinberg
Marie A. Wurster

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR


John Adams

INSTRUCTOR

Evelyn A. Strawbridge

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