(Temple Logo Undergraduate Bulletin

College of Liberal Arts Program Descriptions
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Following is information about programs and majors offered in the College of Liberal Arts. Listed under each degree program are the courses students must successfully complete to earn that particular B.A. or B.S. degree. These required courses are in addition to the University Core Curriculum requirements and the College's requirements. See Core Curriculum and Requirements for the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) and Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) Degrees.


AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDIES

Nathaniel Norment, Jr., Chair

nnorment@nimbus.temple.edu

215-204-5073

Dr. Sonja Peterson-Lewis, Undergraduate Chair

speter01@nimbus.temple.edu

215-204-1996
Dr. Ella Forbes,
Faculty Adviser

eforbes2@vm.temple.edu

215-204-8626
http://www.afro-am@blue.temple.edu

Major Requirements

AAS W051 - Introduction to African American Studies 
AAS 0052 - Introduction to African Aesthetics 
AAS 0100 - African Civilization 
AAS 0151 - Mass Media and the Black Community 
AAS 0155 - Introduction to Research Methods
AAS 0398 - Senior Capstone Seminar

Five additional courses are needed. At least three must be above the 0100 level. Two of these three upper level courses may be chosen from courses having substantial relevant content from history, sociology, political science, English, anthropology, geography and urban studies, economics, psychology, American studies, or speech communication. Students should clear any outside courses to be used for the major with the department adviser prior to registration. Senior Seminar (W398) is the designated writing capstone in the major.

Minor Requirements 

AAS W051 - Introduction to African American Studies 
AAS 0052 - Introduction to African Aesthetics 
AAS 0100 - African Civilization 
AAS 0151 - Mass Media and the Black Community 
AAS 0155 - Introduction to Research Methods

Two additional courses in African American Studies are needed above the 0100 level.


AMERICAN CULTURE AND MEDIA ARTS

 

Carolyn Kitch, Director

215-204-1644

ckitch@temple.edu 

The American Culture and Media Arts major combines faculty and courses from the American Studies Program in the College of Liberal Arts and the Film and Media Arts Department in the School of Communications and Theater.  Students can choose this major from either school. Majors will develop critical thinking skills relating to an understanding of the place of film, television, photography and print media in our society.  They will also develop skills in historical and contemporary  research.  Students graduating with the American Culture and Media Arts major can expect to pursue careers in media-related organizations, e.g. film, video, and radio production; archival and library positions; public relations jobs in media; museum research positions supporting exhibitions and media; writing about media for publications.  Graduates can also pursue advanced training at the graduate level in documentary film production. 

The program and its requirements are described in full in Intercollegial Programs
 

AMERICAN STUDIES

Miles Orvell, Director
orvell@temple.edu
215-204-1054 
http://www.temple.edu/american_studies

Major Requirements

American Studies is an interdisciplinary program that focuses on major issues in the United States, such as work, technology, and the role of the media and the arts; that is, on  important themes that will continue to shape much of American life and which sophisticated professionals must know.  American Studies provides students with a solid understanding of the culture of the United States through courses originating in this department organized around broad topics and through carefully selected courses from other specific disciplines. All must approach the study of life in the United States from a variety of perspectives, not just one discipline. American Studies courses are known as demanding and rigorous and many of them double as Temple University Honors courses. The major stresses development of reading, writing and analytical skills that are necessary for successful careers in various professional fields.

All majors must complete five American Studies core courses, one out of each group below. 

American Biography and Work 

  • C051/H091 - American Lives 
  • C062/H092 - Work in America 
American Culture 
  • 0104/H194 - The Arts in America 
  • 0107 - Leisure in America
  • 0125 - Photography in America
  • 0126 - Documentary Film and American Society 
  • 0127 - Mass Media and American Popular Culture 
Place in American Life 
  • 0103/H195 - American Places: Home, City, Region 
  • 0128 - Philadelphia Neighborhoods 
  • 0130 - Architecture, Urban Design, and American Culture
  • 0131/H196 - American Frontiers 
Diversity in America 
  • 0108/H198 - Immigrant Experiences in America 
  • R112 - African-American Experiences 
  • W118/H192 - American Woman: Visions and Revisions 
  • R136 - Asian-American Experiences 
  • 0137 - Italian/American Literature and Culture
  • 0148  Puerto Ricans in Philadelphia
  • 0151 - Asian American History
  • 0152 - Asian Diaspora
  • 0153 - Asian Women in Transition
  • 0154 - Introduction to Asian American Literature
  • H197 - Quest for the American Dream
Change in America 
  • 0101 - Contemporary Trends in American Work
  • 0102/H193 - Technology and American Culture 
  • 0105/H199 - Ideal America: Reform, Revolution, and Utopia
  • 0106 - Literature and Political Change 
  • 0109/H109 - Courtroom in American Society
  • 0121 - America in the 1950s
  • 0124/H191 - Political Protest and Culture in the 60's 
  • R134 - Literature of American Slavery 
  • W140/H190 - Radicalism in the United States 
AS 0100, Topics in American Culture, may meet one or more of the above requirements with permission of director. 

Students must also complete nine additional credits in American Studies. These can include choices from the AS core courses as well as choices from all other American Studies courses. Finally, students must complete the capstone course AS W393 or AS W394 and at least 12 credits outside of the major selected in consultation with the American Studies director and congruent with an American Studies focus. Six of these credits should be in American history and literature. 

American Studies Minor 

To complete a minor in American Studies a student must complete six American Studies courses (18 s.h.), at least three of which must be from three different American Studies core areas. 

Asian American Minor

Kathy Uno, Coordinator
215-204-7468
aaminor@temple.edu

This new, interdisciplinary minor focuses on Asian American history, culture, and contemporary issues as well as their Asian roots and American context.  The Asian American Minor is 6 courses (18 s.h.), 5 in American Studies and 1 in Asian Studies, as distributed below.  Besides regular courses, students can earn credits through fieldwork and independent study under a professor's guidance.  This minor is a useful credential for majors in education, journalism and communication, social administration, health science, social science, humanities, history, pre-law studies, and business fields like personnel and marketing. 

  • 4 Asian American courses listed or crosslisted in American Studies.  For example, R136 Asian American Experiences; C051 American Lives: Asian American Lives; 0154 Asian American Literature; 0152 Asian Diaspora; 0153 Asian Women in Transition; 0151 Asian American History, and 0155 Asian American Topics.  Courses may focus on specific issues like Filipinos in America, Vietnamese and Filipinos in Diaspora, Chinatowns, Law and Public Policy.
  • 1 American Studies course on race or ethnicity (or an alternative approved by an adviser).  For example, 0108 US Immigrant Experiences; 0148 Puerto Ricans in Philadelphia; R112 African American Experiences; 0100 Native American Literature; 0137 Italian Americans.
  • 1 Asian Studies course under an Asian Studies or crosslisted number.  Advisers can help students choose  from a list of over 60 courses. 
Distinction in Major 

American Studies majors may graduate with distinction in the major if they have a GPA of at least 3.5 in the major and a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0.


ANTHROPOLOGY

Charles Weitz, Chair

weitz@vm.temple.edu

215-204-1424

Michael Stewart, Undergraduate Chair and Faculty Adviser

schurch@ushwy1.com

215-204-6188

http://www.temple.edu/anthro

 

Undergraduates can major in General Anthropology, in the Human Biology Track, or in Visual Anthropology. 

General Anthropology Major

The general anthropology major is intended to give students a foundation in all of the four sub-fields associated with the discipline of anthropology: Cultural Anthropology, Archaeology, Biological Anthropology and Linguistic Anthropology. Each of the sub-fields requires the development of a number of skills including formulating hypotheses, developing research programs and proposals, applying theories to the interpretation of data, including artifacts, and gathering ethnographic information through participant-observation. 

With its focus on human diversity and its emphasis on cultural relativism, anthropology prepares students well for the issues they are likely to encounter in today's workplaces. At Temple, we offer a number of courses on such topics as the Anthropology of Policy, Medical Anthropology and Urban Anthropology, which prepare students for careers in: public administration, social work, health policy, urban planning and other aspects of public policy-related work, in addition to professional careers in fields such as business, law and medicine. Anthropology students are also well-prepared to participate in activities which call for cultural sensitivity and an understanding of cultural differences such as the teaching of English as a foreign language and other work with immigrant communities or work in the global marketplace.

Major Requirements

One introductory Anthropology course from the following:

  • R060 Introduction to Anthropology
  • C061 Cultures of the World
  • H091 Cultures of the World
  • C064 American Culture
  • C065 Origins of Cultural Diversity
Four Anthropology fundamentals courses (introductions to the four sub-fields):
  • W120 Fundamentals of Cultural Anthropology
  • 0124 Fundamentals of Archaeology
  • 0125 Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology
  • 0127 Fundamentals of Linguistic Anthropology

One capstone course: Anthropology W301 History of Anthropological Theory

One methods course, to be chosen from the following nine Anthropology courses:

  • 0306 Linguistic Field Methods
  • 0307 Theory and Methods in Linguistics
  • W308 Research in Visual Anthropology
  • 0310 Fieldwork in Ethnography
  • 0314 Agencies and Services in Philadelphia Communities 
  • 0320 Field Session in Archaeology
  • 0321 Methods in Archaeology (Variable topic course: Soils, Geomorphology, and Stratigraphy or Ceramic Analysis or Lithic Analysis or Field Methods)
  • 0326 Methods in Physical Anthropology
  • 0334 Anthropological Problems in Visual Production 

Five elective courses to be chosen from all the other 0100-level, 0200-level, and 0300-level Anthropology courses. 

Note: One 300-level Methods course is required; others may be taken as electives.

Minor Requirements

The minor in Anthropology consists of 18 credits. 

One introductory Anthropology course from the following: 

  • R060 Introduction to Anthropology 
  • C061 Cultures of the World 
  • C062 Development of an International Perspective 
  • C064 American Culture 
  • C065 Origins of Cultural Diversity 

Two Anthropology fundamentals courses from the following: 

  • W120 Fundamentals of Cultural Anthropology 
  • 0124 Fundamentals of Archaeology 
  • 0125 Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology 
  • 0127 Fundamentals of Linguistic Anthropology 

Three additional Anthropology electives at the 0100 level or above. 

Human Biology Track

Students preparing for medicine, dentistry, physical therapy, optometry, and podiatry sometimes find the traditional science majors too restrictive. In addition to taking the required science courses, they would like to develop the well-rounded liberal arts background for which many health-related professional schools look. This program, like those at Stanford, Michigan, and Harvard, allows students to pursue interests in human population biology, biologically-related courses in psychology, sociology, history, and political science. 

Students will officially major in anthropology, but, instead of the normal anthropology program, in addition to those science courses required for admission to medical/dental/optometry/podiatry school, human biology students will be required to take five courses in biological anthropology, four courses in biology, two electives, and one course in cultural anthropology. 

Interested students should contact the pre-med adviser at Sullivan Hall or the Human Biology Track adviser, Dr. Leonard Greenfield, at (215) 204-1489 or green@temple.edu .

There are 12 courses required for the Human Biology Track major, distributed among the following categories:   

I   

Anthropology 0125

Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology

(NOTE: 0125 is the prerequisite for all courses in Biological Anthropology)

II

Biology C083 & C084

General Biology I & II

or

 

Biology 0103 & 0104

Introduction to Biology I & II

III

Kinesiology C100 & C101

Human Anatomy & Physiology I & II

or

 

Biology 0233 & 0234

Mammalian Anatomy & Mammalian Physiology

IV

Anthropology W120

Fundamentals of Cultural Anthropology 

V

 Two of the following Biological Anthropology courses:

 

Anthropology 0161

Human Paleontology 

Anthropology 0162

Human Biology of Modern Populations                 

Anthropology 0163

Human Population Genetics 

Anthropology 0164

Primate Behavior

VI

One of the following Anthropology courses

 

Anthropology 0212

Medical Anthropology 

 Anthropology 0220

Environmental Physiology    .                

Anthropology 0248

Introduction to Primates                  

Anthropology 0280

Evolutionary Biology         

Anthropology 0326

Methods in Physical Anthropology  (topics vary and students may take this course more than once.  Topics include Human Osteology, Primate Anatomy, and Forensic Anthropology)  

VII

One of the following CAPSTONE seminars

 

Anthropology W323

Advanced Seminar in Medical Anthropology 

Anthropology W324

The Genetic Basis of Human Variation

Anthropology W325

Biocultural Adaptations in Human Populations

Anthropology W327

Evolutionary Perspectives on Human Reproduction  

Anthropology W380

Human Paleontology Seminar

VIII

Two electives from the following list:

                                    

Anthropology 0212

Medical Anthropology 

Anthropology 0220

Environmental Physiology                 

Anthropology 0248

Introduction to Primates 

Anthropology 0280

Evolutionary Biology

Anthropology 0326

Methods in Physical Anthropology (topics vary and students may take this course more than once.  Topics include Human Osteology, Primate Anatomy, and Forensic Anthropology)                      

Biology

Any upper division courses number 0203 and above

Chemistry  0371

Biochemistry  I

Chemistry  0372

Biochemistry II

History 0137

History of Biology 

History W370

American Medicine: A Social History 

Political Science 0132

Biology, Society, and Politics 

Psychology 0103

Behavioral Neuroscience

Psychology 0104

Cognitive Neuroscience

Psychology 0105

Learning and Motivation

Psychology 0108

Cognition: Memory, Language and Thought

Psychology 0131

Developmental Psychology 

Psychology 0141

Social Psychology

Psychology 0150

Psychopathology 

Sociology 0252

Health and Disease in American Society

Visual Anthropology Track

This track allows students to combine the intellectual pursuits of cultural anthropology and visual communication, and to obtain a well-rounded liberal arts background. This course of study enables students to pursue the broad interests articulated above with the study of the theory and practice of ethnographic film and to gain a fuller understanding of the world's varied systems of visual representation.

Interested students should contact the Visual Anthropology Adviser,
Jayasinhji Jhala at (215) 204-7727 or jjhala@astro.temple.edu .

Required Courses
12 courses (36 s.h.) are required for the major.

  • Anthropology 0158, Fundamentals of the Anthropology of  Visual Communication (normally taken as one of the first courses in the track)
  • Anthropology W308, Research in Visual Anthropology (normally taken in student's senior year)
  • Any three of the following Fundamentals courses:
    Anthropology W120, Fundamentals of Cultural Anthropology
    Anthropology 0124, Fundamentals of Archaeology
    Anthropology 0125, Fundamentals of Biological Anthropology
    Anthropology 0127, Fundamentals of Linguistical Anthropology
  • Seven electives chosen from the following Anthropology courses:
    0210 Anthropology of Tourism
    0224 Art and Anthropology
    0233 Anthropological Film
    0234 Anthropology in Feature Films
    0237 Pictorial Lives
    0238 Visual Anthropology of Modern Japan
    0239 Anthropology and Photography
    0241 Indigenous Media
    0242 Anthropology of Mass Media
    0272 American Culture in Japan
    0273 Japanese Culture
    0334 Anthropological Problems in Visual Production


ASIAN STUDIES

Benedict Stavis, Director
215-204-7793
bstavis@nimbus.temple.edu
http://www.temple.edu/asian_studies

Asian Studies draws on the resources of many departments to provide a comprehensive program of study on Asia (especially East Asia). Majors may concentrate on a selected geographic area or subject matter. By combining language with the study of politics, history, society, art, religion and philosophy, and literature, each student can construct a major suited to individual interests. Temple's campus in Japan can provide students a live-abroad experience while taking their course work.  Asian Studies also offers a Certificate in Asian Business and Society, jointly with the Fox School of Business and Management.

Major Requirements (30 s.h. and language)

  • Two Asian Studies Foundation Courses (6 s.h.) selected from: 

            Asian Studies 0115,  Introduction to East Asia: China 
            Asian Studies 0116,  Introduction to East Asia: Japan 
            Asian Studies C086,  [Geography of] East and South Asia
            Asian Studies C084, Chinese and Japanese Literature in Cultural
            Context
            Equivalents of the above courses, incorporating study of South or        
            Southeast Asia and approved by an Asian Studies adviser

  • Asian Studies W300,  Seminar in Asian Studies 
  • Seven additional courses (21 s.h.), cross-listed in at least three disciplines.  Selected by the student and an Asian Studies adviser from the comprehensive list of Asian Studies courses on the Asian Studies brochure or website. The student's program must have a coherent geographical and/or subject matter focus, designed with the advice and approval of an Asian Studies adviser. 
  • Language: Completion of the fourth semester level of a language with a grade of C- or above:  Critical Languages 0167, Chinese Intermediate II; Critical Languages 0171, Japanese Intermediate II; Critical Languages 0173, Korean Intermediate II; Critical Languages 0161, Hindi Intermediate II; or the equivalent.  The language requirement may also be satisfied by examination of oral/aural and reading skills in any Asian language approved by an Asian Studies adviser.
Minor Requirements (18 s.h. and language)
  • Two Asian Studies Foundation Courses (6 s.h.):  See Asian Studies Major Requirements above. 
  • Four additional Asian Studies courses (12 s.h.)
  • Language: Completion of the second semester of a language with a grade of C- or above:  Critical Languages 0067, Chinese Elements II; Critical Languages 0071, Japanese Elements II; Critical Languages 0073, Korean Elements II; Critical Languages 0061, Hindi Elements II; or the equivalent.  The language requirement may also be satisfied by examination of oral/aural and reading skills in any Asian language approved by an Asian Studies adviser.  Note:  Language courses beyond the second semester may be used as "Asian Studies courses" to meet the requirements for the minor.

Certificate in Asian Business and Society Requirements (15 s.h. and language and prerequisites)

  • General and Strategic Management 0100, Fundamentals of Asian Business
  • Economics 0250, International Trade  OR  Economics 0251, International Monetary Economics
  • Asian Studies 0100, Practical Asian Society
  • Asian Studies Country Introduction (see list on Asian Studies web site)
  • Asian Studies Writing Intensive elective (see list on Asian Studies web site)
  • First year proficiency of an Asian Language
  • Prerequisites:  Economics C051 and C052
Distinction in Major

Asian Studies majors may graduate with distinction in the major if they have a GPA of at least 3.5 in the major and a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0.


CRIMINAL JUSTICE

Ralph B. Taylor, Chair 

ralph@blue.temple.edu

215-204-7918
Patricia H. Jenkins, Undergraduate Chair 
phjenkins@worldnet.att.net

215-204-5164

Stephanie Hardy, Adviser

shardy01@temple.edu

215-204-7919

Stephen Smith, Ambler Program Coordinator 
215-283-1532 
Jon E. Clark, Administrator, 
Criminal Justice Training Program 
215-204-7930
http://www.temple.edu/cjus

The mission of the Undergraduate Program in Criminal Justice is to foster a comprehensive understanding of the nature of crime, criminals, and criminal law; the goals, organizations, occupations, and rules that make up the criminal justice system; and the methods of learning that are utilized by scholars of crime and criminal justice. The Bachelor of Arts program will enable students to learn how different academic disciplines approach the study of crime and criminal justice and to understand the kinds of questions and problems that are shaping developments in research, practice, and reform. 

B.A. Major Requirements

Criminal Justice majors must complete the following requirements of the major: 

a. Major Core -- Criminal Justice 

C050 Introduction to Criminal Justice 
0130 Nature of Crime 
W145 Planned Change in Criminal Justice 
0150 Introduction to Criminal Law 
0160 Introduction to Criminal Justice Research 
C161 Criminal Justice Research and Analysis 

b. Major Electives -- An additional 24 semester hours of courses offered by the department, selected in consultation with an adviser. 

Criminal Justice majors may graduate with distinction in the major if they have a GPA of 3.5 in the major and a cumulative GPA of at least 3.25.

Minor Requirements

Students wishing to minor in Criminal Justice must complete the following requirements: 
a. Criminal Justice C050, 0130, W145, 0150. 
b. Any three Criminal Justice courses above the 0100 level. 
c. One seminar (0300 level) course. 

Criminal Justice Practicum

The Department of Criminal Justice offers internship experience (CJ 0303-0304) with criminal justice agencies, rehabilitation and prevention programs, and community organizations dealing with crime. The course allows students to clarify career interests, to synthesize prior knowledge from the classroom with direct experience, to critically examine the criminal justice system in operation, and to sharpen analytical and observational skills. This course is optional with the CJ 0303 (Practicum) credits counting toward the major and the CJ 0304 (Practicum Lab) credits counting as free electives. Prerequisites: CJ Majors/Minors: minimum junior status, minimum 2.5 GPA in major, and completion of CJ C050, CJ 0130, and CJ W145. 


CRITICAL LANGUAGES

 

John B. Means, Director

means@temple.edu

215-204-8268

Louis Mangione, Faculty Adviser

mangione@temple.edu

215-204-8247

Barbara Thornbury, Faculty Adviser

bthornbu@nimbus.temple.edu

215-204-4492

http://www.temple.edu/critlang

The Center for Critical Languages offers courses in several of the less commonly taught languages, principally, though not exclusively, of the East Asian and Mediterranean regions (e.g., Arabic, Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Hindi, Modern Greek). These courses are open to students in any major at Temple. 

The Class Schedule should be consulted for a complete listing of Critical Languages courses and levels of instruction offered each semester. 

The Center for Critical Languages offers certificate programs in Japanese and Chinese, and an undergraduate "minor" in Japanese. However, the Center does not offer a major in any foreign language area. Its language programs are offered in various instructional formats for four hours of undergraduate credit at the elementary level, and three hours at more advanced levels. Students may pursue a concentration in Japanese language, literature, and culture with a "major" in Asian Studies.

The programs in languages other than Chinese and Japanese normally consist of a six semester sequence of course work stressing the spoken and written forms of the language. The Japanese and Chinese programs are much more extensive, and more detailed information is available from the senior professor of each language.

Critical Languages courses are somewhat more difficult (or more demanding of time and energy) than a course in a Western European language. Each student in the Critical Languages Program must work on a daily basis with electronic materials (audio and/or video) corresponding to the texts for the course. 

Students should expect to spend a minimum of 8-10 hours per week throughout the semester in language study at home (working with texts and related materials) or in the Language Resource Center, in addition to the hours each week devoted to the class sessions . Students unable to make a long-term commitment to rigorous and disciplined daily language study are not encouraged to register for Critical Languages courses. 

Participation in regular tutorial sessions (in small groups with a native-speaker), normally two or three hours per week, is expected for languages other than Chinese and Japanese (which meet four times per week). Those drill sessions listed as "arranged" in the Class Schedule will not be scheduled until the first week of the semester, and each student must contact the Center's office for program orientation and tutorial session arrangements on the first day of the semester. At the end of the semester, an outside specialist may evaluate each student's language skills, assessing oral and written proficiencies.  Work in Chinese and Japanese is evaluated on an on-going basis by the faculty in those programs. 

Additional Specialization in Chinese

The Chinese language curriculum offers a full 10 semester (five-year) sequence of courses, principally in the standard classroom mode of instruction.

The Specialization in Chinese consists of the following requirements: 

  • A minimum of 20 credit hours or six courses completed in Critical Languages Chinese courses with a minimum GPA of 2.8 in these courses. 
  • The Specialization in Chinese may be undertaken in conjunction with a baccalaureate degree program or by students who have already completed work toward a baccalaureate. 
  • A student who is an Asian Studies major may use Chinese Specialization courses to satisfy the Asian Studies foreign language requirement, but may not use the same courses to fulfill other Asian Studies requirements (as determined through consultation with the Asian Studies adviser). 
  • The Specialization in Chinese is administered through the Center for Critical Languages and will be attested to by a notation on the student's transcript. In addition, the director of Chinese language study will prepare a separate document describing the particular program of study which the student has completed, and the College of Liberal Arts will issue a document attesting to completion of Certificate requirements. 
Students interested in this program should contact the Director of Chinese Language Studies, Room 347, Anderson Hall, (215) 204-8247. 

Additional Specialization in Japanese

The Japanese language curriculum offers a full 10-semester (five-year) sequence of courses, principally in the standard classroom mode of instruction.

The Specialization in Japanese consists of the following requirements: 

  • A minimum of 20 credit hours or six courses completed in Critical Languages Japanese courses with a minimum GPA of 2.8 in these courses. 
  • The Specialization in Japanese may be undertaken in conjunction with a baccalaureate degree program or by students who have already completed work toward a baccalaureate. 
  • A student who is an Asian Studies major may use Japanese Specialization courses to satisfy the Asian Studies foreign language requirement, but may not use the same courses to fulfill other Asian Studies requirements (as determined through consultation with the Asian Studies adviser). 
  • The Specialization in Japanese is administered through the Center for Critical Languages and will be attested to by a notation on the student's transcript. In addition, the director of Japanese language study will prepare a separate document describing the particular program of study which the student has completed, and the College of Liberal Arts will issue a document attesting to completion of Certificate requirements. 
Students interested in Japanese should contact the director of the Japanese language program, room 332 Anderson Hall, (215) 204-4492.


ECONOMICS

William J. Stull, Chair

215-204-5022

William Holmes, Faculty Advisor

wholmes@sbm.temple.edu

215-204-8175

http://www.temple.edu/cla/econ

The major in economics exposes a student to the economist's way of thinking about social problems and behavior. The major helps a student understand the economic aspect of current events and public policy, and is good preparation for careers in law and business. 

B.A. Major Requirements

Majors in the College of Liberal Arts: 

Economics C051 and C052
Statistics C021 and C022 
Economics 0201, 0202, and W302 
Four electives in economics at the 0200 level or above. Finance 0101 may be substituted for one of these.
Two additional electives. These may be courses in economics at the 0200 level or above or courses in the College of Liberal Arts related to the student's program in economics to be chosen in consultation with an adviser.
Students preparing for graduate study in economics or in an economics-related area are strongly encouraged to take Economics 0240 (Mathematical Economics), Economics 0241 (Introduction to Econometrics), and courses in calculus and linear algebra in the Mathematics Department.

Minor Requirements (For Liberal Arts and all other colleges allowing a minor in Economics)

To minor in economics, a minimum of 18 credit hours must be completed including: 

Economics C051 and C052 
Economics 0201 or 0202 

Three electives in economics at the 0200 level or above. 

Cooperative Education Program

Through this program students earn income while gaining valuable work experience which can enhance their job market prospects upon graduation. By completing an academic research project under the guidance of a faculty member, Co-op students may earn credit for Economics 0288.

Mathematical Economics

In cooperation with the Department of Mathematics, the Department of Economics offers a special concentration leading to a B.A. degree in Mathematical Economics.

Certificate in Political  Economy

A joint program of the Department of Economics and the Department of Political Science leading to a certificate of specialization in political economy. The purpose of the political economy program is to provide undergraduate students with the opportunity to study more intensely the relationship between the political and economic spheres of society.  The program is based on the belief that a focused examination of this relationship provides us with a better understanding of several social phenomena: Chief among these is a better understanding of public policy choices and the policymaking process, as well as a better understanding of how government actions affect the process of economic change and vice versa.

The Political Economy program is open to all matriculated undergraduate students.  Applicants need not be declared majors in either economics or political science.  The political economy program provides an excellent preparation for graduate study in the social sciences and for the study of law.

The program and its requirements are described in full in the "Intercollegial Programs" section of this Bulletin.

Management Career Certificate

Erwin Blackstone, Adviser
215-204-5027
eablacks@sbm.temple.edu
William Holmes, Adviser
215-204-8175
wholmes@sbm.temple.edu

This certificate program is designed for students who intend to seek employment in the business or nonprofit sectors of the economy. It is designed to provide students with skills that complement those acquired through a traditional liberal arts education and to make the students more appealing to potential employers.

Requirements for the Certificate
Six courses, five of them required, one elective chosen from an approved list or approved by the certificate adviser.

Required courses:

  • Economics C050--Introduction to the Economy, or Economics C052--Microeconomic Principles.
  • Accounting 0001--Principles of Accounting 1.
  • Human Resource Administration 0083--Organization and Management.
  • Psychology 0170--Industrial and Organizational Psychology or Marketing 0081--Introduction to Marketing.
  • A statistics course selected in consultation with the certificate adviser.


ENGLISH

Evelyn Tribble, Acting Chair

etrib@temple.edu

215- 204-8567 

Daniel T. O'Hara, Undergraduate Chair

dohara@nimbus.temple.edu

215-204-1793

http://www.temple.edu/english

B.A. Major Requirements

Requirements for a major are 36 semester hours in upper-level English courses, distributed as follows. 

          English 0100, Introduction to English Studies 

                  (or English 0180, Fall 2002 only)

English 0114, Survey of English Literature to 1600
English 0115, Survey of English Literature after 1660
English W116, Survey of American Literature I
English 0117, Survey of American Literature II
Six additional upper-level English courses
One W300 level seminar, the capstone course 

Students may choose to structure their six upper-level courses by taking three or more courses in one of the following optional tracks:

American Literature
International Literature and Film 
Language, Literacy, and Rhetoric 
Rereading the Canon

More information about tracks and courses is available in the Undergraduate English office, 1030 Anderson Hall.

Minor Requirements

At least six upper-level courses in English for a minimum of 18 semester hours. Two of these courses must be chosen from among the four surveys of British and American literature (English 0114, 0115, W116, 0117).  Students are expected to design, with an English Department adviser, a sequence of courses appropriate to their educational and professional goals.

Certificate of Specialization in Writing

Matriculated students interested in broadening their experience in writing, developing skill in various kinds of writing tasks, and deepening their understanding of how writing works are eligible for the Certificate in Writing. Students interested in the Writing Certificate are urged to seek advice on their goals and course choices from the Language, Literacy, and Rhetoric faculty, including Professors Goldblatt, Lebofsky, Parks, Siegel, and Wells. Students earn the certificate by receiving an average of B or above in five of the writing courses listed below, including at least one from each of the three certificate areas: Advanced Expository and Professional Writing, Creative Writing, and Writing Theory. 

Advanced Expository and Professional Writing
English W101--Developing Prose Style
English W102--Technical Writing 
English W104--Writing for Business and Industry
English 0200--Career Internship
English 0201--Advanced Composition
English 0205--Writers at Work

Creative Writing
English W107--Creative Writing: Poetry
English W108--Creative Writing: Fiction
English 0109--Creative Writing: Plays
English W202--Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction 
English W203--Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry
English 0204--Advanced Creative Writing: Plays

Writing Theory
English W105--Literacy and Society
English W106--Texts and Cultures of Science
English W112--Technologies of Writing
English 0212--Linguistics and Grammar
English 0284--Theories of Discourse
English W310--Senior Seminar in Linguistics, Literacy, and Rhetoric
 

ENVIRONMENTAL STUDIES

Robert J. Mason, Director
rmason@nimbus.temple.edu
215- 204-5918
http://www.temple.edu/env-stud

Students will be equipped with the scholarly background and intellectual
skills to understand a wide range of pressing environmental issues, and
they will come to appreciate the physical, economic, political, demographic, and ethical factors that define those issues.  Among the many environmental problems central to our program are groundwater contamination, suburban sprawl, river basin management, environmental justice and the greening of abandoned urban spaces.

Offered jointly by the College of Liberal Arts and College of Science and Technology, Environmental Studies includes both B.A. and B.S. options. A minor also is offered and a Certificate of Completion is an option for those already holding an undergraduate degree in a different field.

The program and its requirements are described in full in Intercollegial Programs


FIRST-YEAR WRITING PROGRAM

Dennis Lebofsky, Director 
(215) 204-1820 
Michael Donnelly, Associate Director 
(215) 204-2072 
1046 Anderson Hall 
http://www.temple.edu/english/fywp.html

The First-Year Writing Program comprises English 0040, 0041, C050, C051, and R050. English 0040 is a four-credit course that focuses on writing within a single theme and disciplinary approach. English C050 is a three-credit course that takes a broader perspective, requiring students to explore a single theme from the point of view of at least two disciplines and meets the Core Composition requirement. English R050 is the same as C050 except that the readings focus on the study of race. R050 meets the Core Studies in Race requirement as well as the Core Composition requirement. English 0041 and C051 are courses designed to meet the needs of the ESL (English as a Second Language) learner, and the guidelines for English 0040 and English C050 are followed. 

English 0040 and C050 form a year-long sequence to introduce students to academic discourse. Entering first-year students are either placed into the 0040-C050 sequence, in C050 only, or exempted from these courses entirely. Placement is based on a formula which takes into account the results of the placement exam, DTLS reading and writing scores, high school rank, and the SAT verbal score.

Until students have completed their English 0040/41 requirement, they may not enroll in English C050/51. English C050/51 is a prerequisite for Intellectual Heritage X051 and X052 and any upper level course in the College of Liberal Arts. English C050/51 or R050 may not be taken for credit by students who have successfully completed English H090.


FRENCH

Margaret Devinney, Chair

devinney@temple.edu

215-204-1760

Ruth Thomas, Faculty Adviser

rpthomas@vm.temple.edu

215-204-1758

http://www/temple.edu/fgis/

B.A. Major Requirements

Prerequisites: French 0051, 0052, 0061, 0062, with C work or equivalent placement. Nine courses including: French 0223-0224, three literature courses at the 0300-level and no more than two courses at the 0100 level.

Minor Requirements

A minor in French consists of a minimum of 18 credits: six courses above the level of French 0051, including at least two courses at the 0100 level and one course at the 0200 level.

Special Foreign Language Certificate in French

Students who complete 20 s.h. in the following sequence in French are eligible for a special Foreign Language Certificate. The number of semester hours required may be reduced by equivalency or proficiency placement.

French 0051 - Elements I 
French 0052 - Elements II 
French 0061 - Intermediate I 
French 0062 - Intermediate II 
French 0125 - French for Business and Travel 
One of the following: French 0121 (Conversation I), French 0220 (Culture and Civilization), or an upper-level course approved by the program director.

Distinction in Major

To be considered for Distinction in Major in French, students must: 

  • be recommended to the Chair of the Department by the French faculty adviser; 
  • complete the requirements for the concentration in French with a GPA of at least 3.50; 
  • have an overall GPA of at least 3.25. 
Study Abroad

Students declaring a major in the department are permitted and encouraged to study abroad. Temple University has a summer program at the Sorbonne in Paris. The Temple Sorbonne Program may be used toward the French major, minor and special Foreign Language Certificate and in partial satisfaction of the International Studies requirement. 

Students interested in study abroad should discuss their plans early with the faculty adviser in French.


GEOGRAPHY AND URBAN STUDIES

Gerald Stahler, Chair

jerry@vm.temple.edu

215-204-6939

Marilyn Silberfein, Undergraduate Chair and Faculty Adviser

geog100@comcast.net

215-204-7625

http://www.temple.edu/gus

The Department of Geography and Urban Studies offers a major in which students gain an understanding of this combined field by taking several basic required courses, supplemented by upper level electives.

Within these guidelines, it is possible for students to choose courses that focus chiefly on geographical studies, including the major distributions of physical and natural phenomena across the globe, the relationship of environment and society, and the concepts underlying spatial analysis and industrial location; or they may choose a program that emphasizes urban studies, exploring the social, political, economic, and historic aspects of urban life including international comparisons of urban society and the policies that governments have devised to address urban problems. 

B.A. Major Requirements

Students must complete a total of 12 courses as follows. 

Required Courses 

  • GUS C050   Environment and Society 
    or  
    GUS C062   Geography of World Affairs

  • GUS R055   Urban Society: Race, Class, and Community 
    or 
    GUS C060   World Urban Patterns 

  • Two of the following four Intermediate courses:

    GUS 0130   Economic Geography
    GUS 0131   Urban Systems in a Global Economy
    GUS 0150   The Urban Environment
    GUS 0156   Environment and Development

  • GUS 0282   Research Methods in Geography and Urban Studies 

  • Statistics course: Students may take Sociology C201, Political Science 0103, Math C067, Psychology C067, or Sociology C067 to fulfill this requirement. 

  • GUS W300 - Senior Seminar/Capstone

Electives in the Major

Students must take five electives in geography and urban studies. At least four of the five must be upper level (courses numbered 0100 or higher). 

Tracks
The department has identified several informal areas of concentration to assist students in making course selections. These do not constitute formal requirements, but rather provide guidelines for developing a personalized curriculum. Students can focus on the following themes: 

     1. Urban Issues 
     2. Environmental Problems 
     3. International Development 
     4. Geographic Techniques

Double Major with the College of Education

It is now possible to become certified as a secondary school social studies teacher by combining a major in Geography and Urban Studies with a major in Social Studies Education. It is also possible to gain certification through a GUS major and education minor followed by a fifth year Master's Degree program in Education.

Certificates of Specialization in Travel and Tourism

Students may take a series of courses that examine the rapidly growing fields of tourism and recreation from an urban/geographical perspective. Two certificates are available: 

Certificate of Specialization in the Geography of Tourism

The courses in this certificate program examine all the world's culture regions and the linkages among them.  Courses can be selected based on a student's interest in domestic or international tourism.  Additional courses would then be chosen to help the student acquire a sense of place as well as strategies for learning about new locations.  Some students might also want to study geographical information systems (GIS) to assess the character of specific tourist destinations.

Requirements:  4 courses, 1 from each of the following groups:

1. GUS C062, Geography of World Affairs; GUS C050, Environment and Society; or GUS R055, Urban Society.

2. GUS C063, Geography of African Development; GUS C086, East and South Asia; or GUS C080, Geography of  the United States and Canada.

3. GUS 0225, Regional Development in the Third World; GUS 0238, Asian Environmental Problems; GUS 0274, American Place; or GUS 0262, Fundamentals of GIS.  As new courses in GUS are developed in the area of international development, they will be added to this list.

4. GUS 0229, Geography of  Travel and Tourism.

Certificate in the Geography of Sports, Recreation and Tourism Planning

Students in this program who are interested in urban recreation and sports can take courses related to urban social and policy issues, while those interested in outdoor/rural recreation can take courses on environmental issues.  The course on geographical information systems (GIS) is particularly relevant to tourism planning.

Requirements: 4 courses, 1 from each of the following groups:

1. GUS C050, Environment and Society; GUS R055, Urban Society; or GUS C052, Physical Geography.

2. GUS 0120, Urban Policy Analysis; GUS W212, Gender, Race, Class, and the City; GUS 0216, Contemporary Issues in City  Planning; or  GUS 0240, Economic Development of Cities.

3. GUS 0250, Environmental Policy Issues;  any other 200 level Environmental Course; or GUS 0262, Fundamentals of GIS.

4. GUS 0229, Geography  of Travel and Tourism. 

Minor Requirements

The Geography and Urban Studies Minor is designed to complement a range of concentrations by providing insights into urban processes and/or a geographic/ecological perspective. Students can also use the minor to acquire marketable skills such as mapping and spatial analysis. 

A minor is achieved by successfully completing six courses as follows: one of the following: GUS C050, C052, C060 or R055; and any five additional upper level courses. 

One of these courses may be replaced by two 2 s.h. courses in urban affairs (GUS 0070-0079); or one upper-division urban or geographically related course in a social science field other than the student's major. 

Distinction in the Major

Geography and Urban Studies students can graduate with distinction if they fulfill the following requirements: A GPA of 3.5 in the major and overall 3.00 GPA, enrollment in at least one graduate or double-numbered course, the completion of an honors paper under the supervision of a faculty member, and the presentation of a paper in a public forum. Students who think that they may qualify for distinction should contact the undergraduate adviser by their junior year. 

Gamma Theta Upsilon

Membership in the National Honorary Society in Geography is available to majors selected on the basis of GPA. Initiations are held each year and student members can submit articles to the GTU journal and apply for national scholarships.

Internships

Students are encouraged to apply their skills and knowledge in a credit-bearing internship that utilizes their academic training. Assignments at planning, social service and other agencies, as well as firms that specialize in mapping and geographic data analysis, have helped in securing employment opportunities.


GERMAN


Margaret Devinney, Chair

devinney@temple.edu

215-204-1760

Istvan Varkonyi, Faculty Adviser 
samsa@temple.edu 

215-204-8276
http://www/temple.edu/fgis/

B.A. Major Requirements

Prerequisites: German C061, 0062. with B- work or equivalent placement. Ten courses (30 credits), including German W231-0232. Approval of the adviser is necessary. Preparations include specifications for minor requirements. Documented study abroad with course certificates from language institutes and universities can count toward course requirements. See Certificates and Study Abroad below. 

Requirements for the Minor in German Communication

The minor consists of a minimum of 18 credits: six courses above the level of German 0051, including at least 0120, W231, 0232, and one course on the 300 level. It is intended to develop communications skills, both written and oral, and to provide vocabulary for business and travel in addition to pertinent recent information on the cultural, intellectual, political, and business conditions of Central Europe. The most recent technologies (Web, Internet, Videotaping, etc.) are being integrated in most of the courses. 

Special Foreign Language Certificate in German

Students may earn a Foreign Language Certificate in German by completing 20 credit hours in the following sequence. 

German 0051 - Beginning I 
German 0052 - Beginning II 
German C061 - Intermediate I 
German 0062 - Intermediate II 
German 0120 - Business German 
One of the following: German W231 (Composition and Conversation) or German 0232 (Culture and Civilization) 
Note: The number of credit hours may be reduced by equivalency or proficiency placement.

Distinction in the Major

To be considered for Distinction in Major in German, a student must: 

    1. be recommended to the Chair of the Department by the German faculty adviser; 
    2. complete the requirements for the concentration in German with a GPA of at least 3.50; 
    3. have an overall GPA of at least 3.25. 
Study Abroad

Students declaring a major in the department are permitted and encouraged to study aboard. Temple University has programs at the Universities of Hamburg and Tuebingen in Germany. These programs may be used toward the German major, minor, and special Foreign Language Certificates. 

Students interested in study abroad should discuss their plans early with the faculty adviser in German


GREEK, HEBREW AND ROMAN CLASSICS

Greek and Roman Classics Division

Robin Mitchell-Boyask, Chair

robin@astro.temple.edu

215-204-8267

Martha A. Davis, Faculty Adviser for Classical Culture

madavis@unix.temple.edu

215-204-8202

Hanoch Guy, Faculty Adviser for Hebrew

han_guy@vm.temple.edu

215-204-8274

http://www.temple.edu/classics

Major Requirements

  1. At least eight courses in Greek and/or Latin, including W101 in at least one of the two languages. 
  2. Three additional courses from any or all of the following categories: 
    • a. Advanced courses in Greek and/or Latin. 
      b. Courses in Classical Culture (e.g., Classical Mythology) 
      c. Courses on aspects of the ancient Greek and Roman world offered in other Temple departments such as Art History, History, Religion and Philosophy, and approved by the department adviser. 
Distinction in Major

Distinction in Greek and Roman Classics requires a senior thesis and a minimum GPA of 3.5 in Greek, Latin, and Greek and Roman Classics courses.

Minor Requirements 

  1. Latin or Greek through the 0062 level. 
  2. Either GHRC 0251 or 0252. 
  3. Four additional courses (see under Major Requirements 2. a-c). Minimum of two of these courses must be above the 0100 level. 
Ancient Mediterranean Studies Minor
  1. Greek, Hebrew or Latin 0051-52. 
  2. One of these courses: GHR Classics W251 (Classical G&R Mythology); W252 (Comparative Mythology); 0242 (Hebrew Myth and Legend); or W254 (Classical Epic). 
  3. Two units of GHR Classics 0263-267, The Ancient City (cycle of five cities offered: Augustan Rome, Spring 2003; Byzantium, Spring 2004; Periclean Athens, Spring 2005; Hellenistic Alexandria, Spring 2006).
  4. One additional course at or above the 100 level from this department or from another department such as Anthropology, Art History, Religion, History or Philosophy, as approved by a GHR Classics department adviser. 
Study Abroad

Greek and Roman Classics students are permitted and encouraged to study abroad, particularly at Temple University Rome. The location and course offerings of this campus make it extremely attractive to anyone interested in the ancient world. Students interested in studying at this campus are encouraged to consult with departmental faculty early in their career at Temple.

Hebrew Classics Division

Major Requirements

Prerequisite: 0051 or equivalent. 0052, C061, 0062, W101 and five Hebrew courses at the 0200/0300 level.

Minor Requirements

Hebrew 0051 and 0052 or Hebrew C061 and 0062. Advanced students will take two electives instead of the above courses. Two courses from the following: Hebrew 0236, 0242, 0245, 0248, 0279, 0379. Electives: Any two Hebrew courses above 0100 level.

Ancient Mediterranean Studies Minor
See requirements as listed under Greek and Roman Classics Division.

Year Abroad

Students declaring concentration in the Division of Hebrew are encouraged to spend one year in one of the universities of Israel. 

All courses are to be approved by the respective departments before the student's departure for Israel. Well-qualified students may be granted credit from Temple University after submitting proper credentials for established foreign study programs. Students interested in study in Israel should discuss their plans early with their faculty adviser and the Chairperson of the Department of Hebrew and Near Eastern Languages.

Distinction in Major in Hebrew

The requirement for admission to the Hebrew Honors Program is adequate fluency in the Hebrew language, demonstrated during an oral interview with the Hebrew Honors Seminar Director. 

Graduation with Distinction in Major in Hebrew requires the completion of at least four semesters or two years of Honors courses and submission of a written report dealing with a Hebrew area in conjunction with a related field (chronologically or by content) from a discipline other than Hebrew. For Distinction in Major, students must also achieve a minimum GPA of 3.5 in all Hebrew courses and other courses required for the major. 


HISTORY

Richard Immerman, Chair

rimmerma@astro.temple.edu

215-204-7461

Arthur Schmidt, Undergraduate Chair

arturo@.temple.edu

215-204-7531

David Jacobs, Faculty Advising Coordinator

djacobs@vm.temple.edu

215-204-7966

http://www.temple.edu/history

B.A. Major Requirements

1. The major in history requires 36 hours, of which at least 24 must be at the 0100 level or more, including 12 at the 0200 and 0300 levels. 

2. Courses are divided into three categories: a) Comparative, Global, and Third World; b) European; and c) United States. Students must take a minimum of two courses of which the predominant content is Third World, two of which the predominant content  is European, and two of which the predominant content is US. Comparative and global courses can fulfill these requirements in whole or in part depending on their content. Students should work closely with departmental advisers in selecting their distributions. 

3. Each major should take four courses that comprise an area of concentration based on some geographic or thematic intellectual rationale. The area of concentration should be defined in writing and approved by a departmental adviser, ideally at the start of the junior year and certainly no later than the start of the senior year.

4. Majors must take at least one writing seminar in their senior year (History W386, Writing Seminar in American History; W387, Writing Seminar in European History; W388, Writing Seminar in Third World History, or W397, Contemporary Theory and Practice of History). 

5. History 0100, Introduction to History, is not required of majors but is strongly recommended, especially if taken during the sophomore year. Students should enroll in History 0100 no later than the fall semester of their junior year. 

Minor Requirements

The minor in history consists of 18 credits in history of which 6 may be numbered below 0100 and 6 must be numbered 0200 or above. 

Distinction in History

To be eligible for a degree with distinction in history, a student must maintain a 3.5 GPA in history and a 3.25 cumulative GPA. In addition, the student must complete a suitable honors thesis under faculty supervision.

Phi Alpha Theta

Membership in the national History Honors Society is open to both history majors and non-majors who have completed more than 12 credits in history and achieved a history GPA of 3.25 and a cumulative GPA of 3.1.


INTELLECTUAL HERITAGE PROGRAM

Daniel Tompkins, Director
pericles@astro.temple.edu
215-204-1770
Istvan Varkonyi, Associate Director
istvan@vm.temple.edu
215 204-3177
http://www/temple.edu/ih

The Intellectual Heritage Program is a writing-intensive two-course sequence required as part of the University Core curriculum. Through encounters with some of the rich, complex, and historically significant texts that have shaped the culture we know in the United States today, students build reading, writing, and speaking skills and intellectual curiosity and engagement. Students become familiar with some of the key concepts and moments in Western and other intellectual traditions.

Intellectual Heritage is required of all entering undergraduate students. Satisfactory completion of the Core Composition requirement is prerequisite to IH X051. IH X051 is prerequisite to IH X052. Honors sections are offered as IH X091 and X092, respectively. 


ITALIAN

Margaret Devinney, Chair

devinney@temple.edu

215-204-1760

Mariquita G. Noris, Faculty Adviser

mgnoris@temple.edu

215-204-8278

http://www/temple.edu/fgis/

B.A. Major Requirements

Prerequisites: Italian 0051, 0052 or equivalent placement, with a minimum grade of C.

Required courses: 10 courses including Italian C061 and Italian 0062. A minimum of three courses at the 0300 level, and five additional courses at the 0100-0200 level or higher. 

Minor Requirements

Students may earn a minor in Italian by completing six courses above Italian 0051, for a minimum total of 18 credit hours.

Special Foreign Language Certificate in Italian

Students may earn a Foreign Language Certificate in Italian by completing 20 credit hours in the following sequence. 

Italian 0051 - Elements I 
Italian 0052 - Elements II 
Italian C061 - Intermediate I 
Italian 0062 - Intermediate II 
Italian 0127 - Italian for Business and Travel 
One of the following: Italian W133 (Composition & Conversation), Italian 0220 (Culture and Civilization), Italian W250 (Advanced Grammar). 
**The number of credit hours required may be reduced by equivalency or proficiency placement. 

Distinction in Major

To be considered for Distinction in Major in Italian, students must: (1) complete the requirements for the concentration in Italian with a GPA of at least 3.50; (2)   have an overall GPA of at least 3.25; (3) be recommended to the Chair of the Department by the Italian faculty adviser. 

Study Abroad

Students declaring a major or a minor in Italian are permitted and encouraged to study abroad. Temple has its own campus in Rome which offers courses in a variety of fields, including art, architecture, and international business. Each semester students from Temple and other universities study in Rome. 

Students interested in studying in Italy should discuss their plans with the Italian faculty adviser as early as possible. 


JEWISH STUDIES

Laura Levitt, Director
llevitt@nimbus.temple.edu
215-204-1644 

Jewish Studies is an interdisciplinary field that allows students to sample courses across the liberal arts curriculum at Temple University. Central to Jewish Studies is an examination of the history, beliefs, customs, practices and languages of the Jewish people throughout the world from the beginnings of recorded history to the present day.

B.A. Major Requirements

  • Language: Hebrew 0062 or its equivalent in fluency approved by a faculty adviser. 
  • Coursework: Twelve courses drawn from the Jewish Studies curriculum, including one introductory course (JS 0110-0122), two courses in religion, two in history, two in Hebrew language or literature, and the capstone course (W342). 
Distinction in Major

Jewish Studies majors may graduate with distinction if they have a GPA of 3.5 or better in the major, and a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, and a grade of 3.5 or better in the capstone course (W342: Individual research project with a specific faculty member. Intended for majors in the final semester of coursework).

Subtracks with Concentrations in History or Religion

Interested students should consult with a Jewish Studies adviser to plan an individual program of study.

Minor Requirements

  • Language: Hebrew C061 or its equivalent in fluency approved by a faculty adviser. 
  • Coursework: Seven courses drawn from the Jewish Studies curriculum, including one introductory course (JS 0110-0122), one course in religion, one in history, and one in Hebrew language or literature. 


LATIN AMERICAN STUDIES

Rosario Espinal, Director
espinal@temple.edu

215-204-7527

Philip Evanson, Faculty Advisor

pevanson@nimbus.temple.edu

215-204-5993

http://www.temple.edu/LAS

The Latin American Studies Center offers three academic programs for undergraduates: the Latin American Studies Major, the Latin American Studies Minor, and the Latin American Studies Semester (LASS). 

B.A. Major Requirements

12 courses (36 semester hours) distributed as follows: 

  • Majors must take Latin American Studies C050 or the Latin American Studies Semester Program (LASS)

  • Majors must take nine Latin American Studies content courses (0100 and above, not including LAS W315)

  • Majors must take Spanish 0230 or Spanish 0240 or any 0300 level Spanish-American literature course taught in Spanish

  • Majors complete their requirements with the writing intensive Latin American Studies Seminar (LAS W315). 

Minor Requirements

To obtain a minor in Latin American Studies, students must complete six courses (18 credits) in Latin American Studies. C050 (3 credits) or the LASS program (6 credits) is required to obtain the minor. Other courses must be taken at the 0100 level or higher. Students must also demonstrate a reading knowledge and speaking facility of Spanish or Portuguese either by taking a Spanish or Portuguese course numbered 0100 or above, by completing the LASS program, or by examination.

Latin American Studies Semester (LASS)

The Latin American Studies Semester (LASS) is offered each spring semester for a total of 15 hours of undergraduate credit. LASS provides a total immersion experience in the study of the Spanish language and Latin America. Students who participate in LASS, even if they are absolute beginners in the language, develop considerable fluency in Spanish in only one semester of concentrated study. 

LASS students not only take an intensive Spanish language instruction, but they also take special courses on Latin America taught in Spanish. 

A trip to a Latin American country during the spring recess is a major feature of LASS. For the past several years, LASS has traveled to Merida in the Yucatan region of Mexico. During the trip, students have the opportunity to live with local families, to use their developing language skills, and to experience Latin America firsthand. 


MUSIC

Janet M. Yamron, Adviser
215-204-8301
Academic Advising Center
215-204-7971 

B.A. Major Requirements

All students who plan to enter the College of Liberal Arts for the music major (non-performing) curriculum must pass a Theory Entrance Examination before enrolling in the program. Contact Linda White, at the College of Music (215-204-8598), to arrange for the examination. Applications are processed by the College of Music. 

The curriculum for music majors will generally be the following requirements: 
 
Freshman Year 1st sem. 2nd sem.
Aural Theory 0041, 0042 2 2
Intro. to Th. & Lit. 0045 2 0
Secondary Piano 0005, 0006 1 1
Choral Ensemble 1 1
Theory C143 0 3
Composition C050 3 0
Intellect. Heritage X051 0 3
Physics C067 3 0
Mathematics C055 0 3
Arts/Related Arts 3 3
15 16
Sophomore Year
Aural Theory 0141, 0142 2 2
Theory 0144, C243 3 3
Secondary Piano 0105, 0106  1 1
Choral Ensemble 1 1
Music in History 0160, 0161  2 2
Individual and Society 3 0
Intellectual Heritage X052 3 0
Related Arts 0 3
Music Elective 0 2
15 14
Junior Year
Choral Ensemble 1 1
Conducting 0123, 0124 1 1
Counterpoint 0343 2
Orchestration 0242 2 0
Music in History W260, W261 3 3
American Culture 0 3
Mathematics ¾ 0
Foreign Language 0061, 0062 3 3
*Academic Elective 3 0
Science B/Computer Application C315 0 3
16/17 16
Senior Year
International Studies 3 3
*Academic Elective 3 3
American Music C086 3 0
History Pop 0132/ History Jazz 0138 0 3
Conducting 0330, 0331 2 2
Music Elective 3 3
Music Electives 0 2
Choral Ensemble 1 0
15 16

Total: 123 credits needed for graduation.

*One additional course in Humanities 0100-0399 required; two Social/Natural Sciences or Mathematics 0100-0399 required. 

Students with a major in music must take at least 60 semester hours in CLA courses.

Courses taken in the major count toward the requirement to take 45 semester hours in upper-level courses.

Minor Requirements

A minor in music consists of a minimum of 21 semester hours. Students wishing to minor in music must successfully complete Music Studies 0041 and C143. The remaining 16 credits may be chosen in the following distribution: 

  • A minimum of seven credits must be chosen from the approved list of music history, music theory, and music literature courses. 
  • As many as nine credits may be chosen from the approved list of applied (performing) music lessons and ensembles. However, the applied music courses are optional and are not required for the minor. These remaining nine credits can be selected from either or both of the two categories. Contact the Associate Dean for the list of approved courses. 

ORGANIZATIONAL STUDIES

Regina Bannan, Director 
bannan@temple.edu
215-204-1777
http://www.temple.edu/orgstudies

Organizational Studies is a major designed for the adult student who wants to complete a bachelor's degree. Recently developed by Temple faculty, it is an innovative liberal arts degree with a business focus, building competencies in communications and technology as well as in critical thinking. Its intellectual center is the study of organizations in a social science framework, and it provides information about the workplace of the present and the future. Six foundation courses begin this interdisciplinary major, which can be completed by taking one of a wide range of courses to fulfill each of its advanced requirements, concluding with a research/writing capstone. 

The delivery of Organizational Studies is also innovative. Temple courses can be taken online as well as in traditional classrooms at University campuses; at two community colleges: Bucks County and Delaware County, and at workplaces of cooperating employers.  Temple considers a student of 22 years of age or older to be an adult student, and accommodates elements of the application process for them.

Major Requirements

Minimum Major Hours: 41

All students must complete six foundation courses, one from each category: 

  • HRA 0083, Organization & Management 
  • ECON C050, Introduction to the Economy or ECON C051, Macroeconomic Principles or ECON C052, Microeconomic Principles 
  • PSYCH C060 or X091, Psychology as a Social Science 
  • CIS C055 or H095, Computers and Applications 
  • ANTHRO C061 or H091, Cultures of the World or  SOC C050 or X050 or H090, Introduction to Sociology 
  • MATH C067, Elements of Statistics or PSYCH C067, Foundations in Statistical Methods or SOC C067 or H097, Social Statistics

All students must complete six advanced courses, one from each category: 

Advanced Behavioral Science

ANTHRO 0228, Social Organization
ECON 0286, Economics of Organizations 
PSYCH 0170--Industrial/Organizational Psychology 
SOC W248, Sociology of Organizations
Advanced Communications
BTMM W312, Organizational Communications Systems 
COMM SCI 0214, Conflict and Communication 
ENG W104, Writing for Business and Industry 
ENG W112, Technology and Writing from Plato to the Digital Age 
Advanced Business & Economics
ECON 0270, Economics of Labor Markets
ECON 0272, Women in the Economy 
ECON 0282, Economics of American Industry
HRA 0315, Power, Influence and Negotiation 
HRA 0320 or H390, Managing People at Work 
HRA 0330, Communicating in Organizations 
Tools of Inquiry
PSYCH 0122, Inferential Methods for Psychology 
SOC C201, Statistical Methods in Sociology 

Technology

BTMM 0150, Introduction to Cybermedia 
BTMM 0375, Cybermedia Workshop 
CIS 0155, Fluency in Information Technology
GSM 0261, Software Applications to Business Problems 
PSYCH 0321, Psychology and Technology 
Advanced and Specialized Topics

AMST 0100, Topics in American Culture, depending on topic
AMST 0101, Contemporary Trends in the American Workplace
AMST 0109, Courtroom in American Society 
ANTHRO 0211, Anthropology and Culture Change
ANTHRO 0215, Anthropology and Social Policy
ANTHRO 0266, Urban America
BTMM 0114, Mass Communication Research 
BTMM W333, Global Telecommunications 
ECON 0244, The Economics of Management and Privatization
ECON 0262 or W262, Health Economics
ECON 0267, Law and Economics
ECON 0279, Public Control of Business: Antitrust
HIST 0103 or H193, World Economy Since 1945
HIST 0176, History of the American Economy/Business
POL SCI 0165, Public Administration
POL SCI 0263, Industrial Organization
PSYCH 0141, Social Psychology
PSYCH 0320, Topical Seminar, depending on topic
SOC 0251, Urban Sociology

SOC 0258, Women and Work

SOC 0270, Sociology of Law

SOC 0283, Social Movements

SOC 0298, Sociology of Business

All students must complete one of the following writing-intensive
research courses, which serves as the capstone for the major:

OS W393, Senior Seminar in Organizational Studies
PSYCH W274, Research Methods: Personality and Social Psychology
PSYCH W279, Research Methods: Applied Research Methodology

 


PHILOSOPHY

Richard Shusterman, Chair 
shusrich@astro.temple.edu

215-204-1742

Charles Dyke, Faculty Adviser

cdyke@astro.temple.edu

215-204-1738

http://www.philoso@blue.temple.edu

The Philosophy Department offers a B.A. degree program. The program is designed to provide a solid foundation for various professions in business, government, and professional schools (such as law), as well as an excellent background for the further study of philosophy. 

Major Requirements

  • 0100 Introduction to Philosophy 

  • or 0191 Introduction to Philosophy 
    or C050 Philosophical Challenges to the Individual 

  • C066 Introduction to Logic 

  • 0161 History of Philosophy-Greek 

  • 0172 History of Philosophy-Modern 

  • 0222 Contemporary Ethical Theory

  • or 0226 Classics in Moral Philosophy 

  • 0298 Senior Seminar

  • or 0293 Pre-Law Tutorial 
    or 0294 Pre-Med Tutorial 

  • Six additional philosophy courses at the Arts and Sciences level. 

Minor Requirements

To minor in philosophy, a minimum of 18 semester hours must be completed including: 

  • 0100 Introduction to Philosophy or C050 Philosophical Challenges to the Individual 
  • 0055 Critical Thinking or C066 Introduction to Logic 
  • 0121 Introduction to Ethical Theory or 0222 Contemporary Ethical Theory or 0226 Classics in Moral Philosophy 
  • 0161 History of Philosophy-Greek or 0172 History of Philosophy-Modern 
  • Two additional philosophy courses numbered 0100 or above. 

POLITICAL SCIENCE

 

Joseph Schwartz, Chair 
jschw@temple.edu

215-204-7796

Richard Joslyn, Undergraduate Chair 

richard.joslyn@temple.edu

215-204-8650

http://www.polsci@blue.temple.edu

The Department of Political Science offers a B.A. degree in a major designed to have two essential purposes. The first, reflected in the three required courses, is to expose the student to the principal intellectual concerns and sub-fields of the discipline. These include the subjects of American, comparative or international politics, and the distinctive intellectual orientations of political philosophy. 

The second purpose of major requirements is then to allow students considerable flexibility to pursue subjects of their choice in more advanced courses in political science. In addition to the sub-fields named above, they may also take courses in public policy and urban politics. 

Major Requirements

The requirement for the political science major is ten courses or 30 s.h. in political science, including three required courses: Political Science C051 (American Political System); Political Science C052 (Foreign Governments and Politics) or Political Science C053 (International Politics); and Political Science W101 (Political Philosophy), which fulfills the department's capstone writing requirement. The additional seven political science courses may be selected from any of the total political science offerings numbered 0103 or above. Not more than two supervision-type courses (internships and independent study) may count toward the seven elective courses, and these include P.S. 0371, 0372, 0373, 0382, 0383, and 0384. 

Students can specialize in their programs by concentrating their course work in one of the following six areas: American politics, comparative politics, international politics, political theory, public policy, and urban politics. 

Minor Requirements

Students may earn a minor in political science by completing 6 s.h. of political science from C051, C052 or C053, W101, and 12 s.h. of political science at the level of courses numbered 0103 or above, for a total of 18 s.h. 

Distinction in Major: Honors Program

The Honors Program in Political Science is open to departmental majors who exhibit particular promise in their field. The program enables majors to study in small, participatory seminars and to develop the analytic and research skills necessary for graduate or professional school and for careers in political research. Offerings rotate among faculty members and consist of advanced topics in one of the major fields of political science (international relations, American politics, political theory, comparative politics, and public policy). 

Completion of the Distinction in Major Program involves taking two of the four honors seminars offered to juniors and seniors: PS 0291, 0292, 0391, and 0392. Listings of the specific seminar offerings and instructors for the next two years are available during each spring priority registration. Prerequisites are a 3.2 cumulative average, a 3.3 average in political science, completion of two of the three required political science courses, and admission by the departmental Honors Coordinator. Students may apply to the Honors Coordinator for admission beginning the spring of their sophomore year (for the fall junior semester). While applications will be accepted as late as spring of the junior year (in order to take the two senior honors seminars), earlier admission insures a wider choice of seminar offerings over the course of a student's junior and senior year in the program. The two Honors classes count toward elective credit in the major. 

Joint Certificate in Political Economy

This is a joint program of the Department of Economics and the Department of Political Science leading to a certificate of specialization in political economy. The purpose of the political economy program is to provide undergraduate students with the opportunity to study more intensely the relationship between the political and economic spheres of society.  The program is based on the belief that a focused examination of this relationship provides us with a better understanding of several social phenomena:  public policy choices and the policymaking process, how government actions affect the process of economic change and vice versa. 

The program is open to all matriculated undergraduate students.  Applicants need not be declared majors in either economics or political science.  The political economy program provides an excellent preparation for graduate study in the social sciences and for the study of law. 

The program and its requirements are described in full in the "Intercollegial Programs" section of this Bulletin

Experiential Learning in Political Science

The Political Science department offers a special 6 s.h. course  every semester combining an academic seminar (for 3 s.h.) with an internship in a setting relevant to the subject matter of the course (for an additional 3 s.h.).  The department's internship coordinator makes internship placements, and admission to these courses is strictly by application.  While particular admissions requirements differ for each specific course, students generally must have good academic standing, have completed the required introductory level courses in political science, and be at least second semester sophomores.  Preference is generally given to students closest to graduation because of the contacts made through the internship that can lead to job prospects.  Recent offerings include Campaign 2000, Law and Society, and The Politics of Poverty, and are publicized each semester.


PSYCHOLOGY

Willis Overton, Chair

overton@temple.edu

215-204-7360

Margo Storm, Faculty Adviser

mstorm@temple.edu

215-204-3409

http://www.temple.edu/psychology

B.A. Major Requirements

35 semester hours in Psychology. 

Required courses: 

  • Psychology C060 (Psychology as a Social Science)
  • Psychology 0070 (Psychology as a Natural Science)
  • Psychology C067 (Foundations in Statistical Methods) or equivalent
  • Psychology 0122 (Inferential Methods in Psychology), 
  • Biology C071 (Human Biology) or Biology C083 (General Biology) or Chemistry C071/C073 (General Chemistry) or Physics C085 (General Physics). 

Further requirements include the following Psychology courses:  two courses from Group I, two courses from Group II, two courses from Group III -- one from A and one from B, and one course from Group IV. 

Group I 
Prerequisite: Psychology C060.

0131 Developmental Psychology 
0141 Social Psychology 
0150 Psychopathology 
0151 Theories of Personality 
0170 Industrial and Organizational Psychology 

Group II
Prerequisites: See each course in Undergraduate Course Descriptions

0103 Behavioral Neuroscience 
0104 Cognitive Neuroscience 
0105 Learning and Motivation 
0108 Cognition: Memory, Language, and Thought 
0111 Sensation and Perception 
0128 Measurement 

Group III    
W270 Series: Research Methods

Prerequisites: Psychology 0070, 0122, and course shown in parentheses. Successful completion of prerequisite courses is necessary to register for Group III courses. Group III courses will not be counted towards graduation unless prerequisites have been completed. Any exceptions concerning prerequisites require written permission.  

A.
W270 Learning and Motivation (0105) 
W271 Sensation and Perception (0111) 
W272 Measurement (0128) 
W275 Behavioral Neuroscience (0103 or 0104) 
W276 Cognition (0108) 

B. 
W274 Personality and Social Psychology (0141, 0150, 0151, or 0170) 
W278 Developmental Psychology (0131) 
W279 Applied Research Methodology (0141 or 0170) 

Group IV
Prerequisites: Completion of the requirements in Groups I and II. 

0315 History and Systems 
0320 Series: Topics in Psychology 

Honors in Psychology

The Psychology Honors program allows students to do independent research and seminar work in each of their last three semesters under the Psychology 0391-0394 sequence. Application is made in the first semester of the junior year. An overall GPA of 3.5 is required. The Psychology 0391 through 0394 sequence replaces one of the Group II courses and Psychology 0328 is also required for the Honors program. 

Minor Requirements

22 semester hours in Psychology. 

Required Psychology courses : 

  •  C060 (Psychology as a Social Science)
  • 0070 (Psychology as a Natural Science)
  • C067 (Foundations in Statistical Methods) or equivalent
  • 0122 (Inferential Methods in Psychology)

Further requirements include one course from Group I, one course from Group II, and one course from Group III - from either A or B. Please see description of concentration requirements for lists of courses in each group. 

Minor in Cognitive Neuroscience

Cognitive neuroscience focuses on a fundamental mystery of science: how the mind arises from the brain. Students in the College of Liberal Arts, as well as students in other colleges and schools, may choose to minor in this emerging, interdisciplinary field. 

Interested students should fill out a form of declaration at the Academic Advising Center, Sullivan Hall, after accumulating 60 credit hours. 

Required courses:

Core Course: Psychology 0104, Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience (3 s.h.) 

Required Disciplinary Core Courses (7 s.h.): 

  • Psychology 0108, Cognition (3 s.h.) (Prerequisite: Psychology 0070)
  • Communication Sciences 0235, Human Neuroscience (4 s.h.) 

Elective Courses (choose 3 for 9 s.h.) 

  • Biology 0352, Neurobiology (3 s.h.) (Requires permission of instructor)
  • Biology 0356, Origin and Development of the Nervous system (3 s.h.) (Prerequisite: Biology 0204 or permission of instructor)
  • English 0111 or Communication Science 0108, Introduction to Linguistics (3 s.h.)
  • Philosophy 0144, Philosophy of Mind (3 s.h.)
  • Psychology 0327 or 0329, Topics in Psychology (3 s.h.) 
  • Psychology 0290, Independent Study: Cognitive Neuroscience (3 s.h.) (Prerequisites: Psychology C067, 0122) 

Note: Students majoring in a given discipline can "double count" no more than two classes towards both their major and their minor. Thus, if a student majoring in Psychology were to count Psychology 0104 and 0108 toward both their major and minor, and if they elected to take Psych 0327 or Psych 0329 for their minor, they would be required to take another 300 level course for their major. 

 


RELIGION

Khalid Blankinship, Chair
kblankin@unix.temple.edu
215-204-7973
Vasiliki Limberis, Undergraduate Chair and Faculty Adviser 
limberis@astro.temple.edu
215-204-8756
http://www.temple.edu/religion

Religion is a pervasive, powerful, multifaceted, and enduring dimension of human experience.  Religions have shaped complex cultures and countless individual lives.  They are influential in the world today and will continue to be so in the future.  The academic study of religion is multidisciplinary, drawing upon approaches from history, literary studies, philosophy, and the social sciences.  It is multicultural, exploring the beliefs, practices, and development of particular religious communities in many different cultures.  The Temple Religion Department is one of the most diverse in the university, with faculty members and students of many different religious traditions, cultures, and academic and personal perspectives.  The richness of religious and cultural life in Philadelphia and the region provides a valuable context for the study of religion and of religious traditions and communities. 

The Bachelor of Arts in Religion is a solid liberal arts degree, providing graduates with the knowledge base and the intellectual, communication, and interpersonal skills essential to success in any career.  More specifically, knowledge of religion -- and the ability to think clearly and communicate effectively about it -- is valuable in fields that involve public affairs, international and cross-cultural relations, religious issues or groups, or interaction with diverse individuals and populations.  While it provides insights into the role of religion in personal, group, and societal identity and conflict, studying religion does not require any particular religious background or commitment.

The concentrations within the major differ only in emphasis.  Religion and Public Life prepares students for careers in law, public policy, human and social services, and medicine and healthcare.  Religions in a Global Context is of special value to those looking toward careers in the international arena or involving religious diversity.  Both concentrations are also excellent preparation for graduate work in religious studies, law, medicine, the humanities and the social sciences.

B.A. Major Requirements

To achieve the objectives of the Department, a major program in Religion has the following components:

  • Satisfaction of University Core Curriculum and College of Liberal Arts requirements
  • Successful completion of these departmental requirements:
  • Two of these introductory Religion courses:
    C050  Introduction to Asian Religions
    C051  Introduction to Western Religions
    C052  Religion in America
    C053  Introduction to World Religions
  • Eight more Religion courses, at least five but not more than six of which are in the student's departmental concentration (see below).  No more than two of the eight may be lower-level courses.  At least one of the eight will be an upper-level Writing-Intensive Religion course of the student's choice, which serves as the departmental Writing Capstone course.  One of the eight courses may be taken outside the Religion Department, in a field of related study, provided that CLA credit is given for such a course. 

Transfer students: No more than five religion courses taken at other institutions  may be accepted for the major. The Director of Undergraduate Studies must  determine that these courses meet the standards of the Department of Religion.

Concentrations

Religion and Public Life provides opportunities to explore and examine in depth the various dimensions and issues of public life that stem from religious beliefs, behaviors, and institutional legacies.  By investigating the religious dimensions of a range of challenging issues, the student gains an awareness of the dilemmas and prospects religion offers to contemporary society.

C054 Religion and Society
C055 Racial Justice: A Religious Mandate for Obedience & Revolt
C081 Religion and the Arts
0151 Introduction to African-American Religion
0158 African Religions and New World Culture
0203 The Islamic State
0205 Women in Islam
0208 Islam in America
0224 What is Judaism?
0234 Judaism and Literature
0253/W253 What is Christianity?
0301 Women in Religion and Society
0304 Earth Ethics
0306 Holocaust
0307 Ethics of Human Institutions
0326 Philosophy of Religion
0341 Religion and Psychology
W343 Death and Dying
0350 Religion and Human Sexuality East and West
0352 Religious Ethics and Propaganda
0358 Cults and Sects
0359 Religion and Science

Other courses will be identified by the Department as they are available.

Religions in a Global Context provides opportunities to explore and examine in depth a variety of religious traditions.  While investigating the philosophies, practices, history, and cultural implications of those traditions, the student gains insight into religion as a cross-cultural dimension of human experience.
0106/W106 Religions of India
0115 Introduction to Zen Buddhism
0116 Chinese Religions
0117 I Ching, Taoism and Zen
0118 Chinese Buddhism
0119 Japanese Religions
0120 Japanese Buddhism
0122/W122 Introduction to Buddhism
0151 Introduction to African American Religion
0157 Traditional Religions of Africa
0158 African Religions and New World Culture
0181 Introduction to Eastern Orthodoxy
0200/W200 Introduction to Islam
0202 Religion in the Ancient Near East
0205 Women in Islam
0207 Islamic Mysticism
0208 Islam in America
0224 What is Judaism?
W240 Introduction to the Bible
0241 Introduction to New Testament
0245 History of Christianity I
0246 History of Christianity II
0253/W253 What is Christianity?
0256 Jesus in the Gospels
0326 Philosophy of Religion
0327 Comparative Philosophy of Religion
0386 Mysticism East and West

Other courses will be identified by the Department as they are available.

Minor Requirements

A minor in Religion has the same objectives and offers the same kinds of opportunities for learning as the major, in a program designed for students concentrating in another academic field.  It consists of:

Two of these introductory Religion courses:

  • Religion C050  Introduction to Asian Religions
  • Religion C051  Introduction to Western Religions
  • Religion C052  Religion in America
  • Religion C053  Introduction to World Religions
Four more Religion courses, no more than one of which is lower-level.

While a concentration is not required for the minor, students may choose
to concentrate in Religion and Public Life by taking Religion C052 and C053
and at least three upper-level Religion courses in that concentration, or in "Religion in the Global Context" by taking Religion C050 and C051 and at least three upper-level Religion courses in that concentration.

Minor in Jewish Studies

Language: Hebrew 0061 or its equivalent in fluency approved by a faculty adviser. 

Coursework: Seven courses drawn from the Jewish Studies curriculum, including one introductory course (JS 0110-0122), one course in religion, one in history, and one in Hebrew language or literature. 

Distinction in Major in Religion

Students who wish to be admitted to Distinction in Major in Religion in either their junior or senior year must have an overall GPA of 3.00 in their first two or three years of study in CLA and an average of 3.50 in religion courses, or they must have successfully completed the first two years of the College Honors Program. For graduation with Distinction in Major, an overall GPA of 3.25 is required with 3.5 in Religion. Consult the departmental adviser for further guidelines.


RUSSIAN

Margaret Devinney, Chair

devinney@temple.edu

215-204-1760
Maria Swiecicka-Ziemianek
, Faculty Adviser
mSZ1768@aol.com
215-204-1768
http://www/temple.edu/fgis/

B.A. Major in Russian Requirements 

Prerequisites: Russian 0051, 0052

Ten courses (30 credits), including Russian C061, 0062, 0149 or 0150, Russian W231-0232, Russian 0225 or 0226 and four courses at the 300 level. All courses must be selected with the approval of the adviser.

Minor Requirements*

A minor in Russian consists of a minimum of 18 credits.

Russian

C061 Intermediate Russian I 3 s.h.
0062 Intermediate Russian II 3 s.h.
0149 or 0150 Comparative Slavic Literature 3 s.h.
W231 Composition and Conversation 3 s.h. 
0232 Culture and Civilization 3 s.h.

One course in Russian 0225 or 0226, or one course on the 300 level.

Total 18 s.h.

* If students test out of 0051-0052, 0061-0062, they are requested to take courses on the 100, 200, or 300 level to equal a minimum of the total number of credits required.

Special Foreign Language Certificate in Russian*.
Students who complete 20 s.h. in the following sequence in Russian are eligible for a special Foreign Language Certificate.

Russian 0051 - Beginning I 4 s.h. Russian 0052 - Beginning II 4 s.h. Russian C061 - Intermediate I 3 s.h. Russian 0062 - Intermediate II 3 s.h. Russian 0120 - Russian for Business and Travel 3 s.h.

One of the following: Russian W231 (Composition and Conversation) or Russian 0232 (Culture and Civilization), or an upper-level course approved by the program director.

* If students test out of 0051-0052, C061-0062, they are requested to take courses on the 0100, 0200, or 0300 level to equal a minimum of the total number of credits required.

Honors in Russian

To be considered for Honors in Russian, students must: (1) be recommended to the Chair of the Department by the Russian faculty adviser; (2) complete the requirements for the concentration in Russian with a GPA of at least 3.50; (3) have an overall GPA of at least 3:25.


SOCIOLOGY

Julia Ericksen, Chair
julia.ericksen@temple.edu
215 204-7979

Gretchen Condran, Undergraduate Chair

gcondran@temple.edu

215 204-1452

Shanyang Zhao, Faculty Adviser

shanyang.zhao@temple.edu

215 204-7767

Michelle Byng, Faculty Adviser

mbyng@temple.edu

215 204-7980

http://www.temple.edu/sociology

 

 

B.A. Major Requirements

The following requirements apply to freshmen and transfer students entering in fall, 2002 and later. 

A minimum of 11 full courses in sociology, including:

One of the following two introductory courses: 

C050/X050 Introduction to Sociology (Core course) 
C051/X051 Comparative Societal Development (Core course) 

Each of the three courses listed below: 

0201 Statistical Methods in Sociology 
0241 Development of Sociological Thought 
0260 Research Design and Methods 

One of the following advanced method courses: 

0301 Doing Sociological Fieldwork 
0302 Data Analysis 

[Both 0201 and 0260 must be taken prior to taking 
an advanced methods course.]

The following writing-intensive capstone course: 

W380 Doing Sociology in the Real World

One of the following research-intensive courses:

0209 Introduction to Population Studies: Demography
0218 Socialization 
0245 Comparative Family Studies 
0246 Sexuality & Gender 
0251 Urban Sociology 
0252 Health & Disease in American Society 
0259 Health and Reproduction
0280 Constructing Race and Ethnicity
0301 Doing Sociological Field Work
0302 Data Analysis

[By semester alternatives will be listed on the department's web-page prior to registration.] 

Three other sociology courses at the 0200 level and above.

One other sociology course at any level.

Two social science courses at the 0100 level and above selected from a department other than Sociology. 

The department regularly offers research intensive courses and a community research practicum that give students applied experience in data collection, analysis, and reporting. Additionally, in cooperation with the College of Allied Health Professions, the department offers a health track for sociology majors who are interested in working in the health care industry. Finally, students can participate in independent study and internship courses under the sponsorship of a sociology faculty member. Internships are specifically designed to have students apply a sociological perspective and research methodologies in a business,  social, or community organization. Through required and elective courses, the sociology major has been structured to prepare students for professional employment and graduate study. 

Health Track in Sociology

Gretchen Condran, Adviser
215-204-1452
gcondran@nimbus.temple.edu

The Health Track in the Department of Sociology is a concentration of courses for majors in sociology who have special interest in medical sociology.  The track is excellent preparation for students preparing for careers in medicine and the health care system, or in organizations carrying out research on health related topics. Pre-med students and others considering careers in Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Health Education, Health Administration and related fields are encouraged to explore this program. 

The Health Track in Sociology will examine the practice of medicine and health care delivery, the place of the health-related professions and their role in shaping the larger society. Courses in this track will delineate the social contexts in which medical institutions are located, describe the nature of these institutions and the changes in them in response to policies relating to reimbursement, health insurance and managed care.  Sociology majors in this track will develop skills in thinking critically about health care delivery systems.  They will have experience in primary and evaluation research and will have the computer, statistical and analytic skills required to carry out and assess such research. 

Required Courses

One of the following courses:

C050/X050 Introduction to Sociology
C051/X051 Comparative Societal Development 

Each of the courses listed below:

0201 Statistical Methods in Sociology
0241 Development of Sociological Thought
0260 Research Design and Methods 

One of the following advanced methods courses:

0301 Doing Sociological Fieldwork
0302 Data analysis 

[Both 0201 and 0260 must be taken prior to taking
an advanced methods course.]

One of the following research-intensive courses:

*0209 Introduction to Population Studies: Demography
  0218 Socialization
  0245 Comparative Family Systems
*0246 Sexuality and Gender
  0251 Urban Sociology
*0252 Health and Disease in American Society 
*0259 Health and Reproduction
  0280 Constructing Race and Ethnicity
  0301 Doing Sociological Fieldwork
  0302 Data Analysis

The following writing-intensive capstone courses:

 W380 Doing Sociology in the Real World

Three additional Sociology courses at the 0200 level which might include:

*0259 Health and Reproduction
*0295 Internship in Sociology
*0253 Sociology of Aging 

One other Sociology course which might include:

*0082 Human Sexuality 

Two courses at the 0100 level or above from the following list:

Anthropology 163 Human Population Genetics
Anthropology 212 Medical Anthropology
Criminal Justice 0320 Medical Disorder and Criminal Law
Economics 262/ W262 Health Economics
Geography and Urban Studies 273 Drugs in Urban Society
Healthcare Management C101 Introduction to Healthcare Management
Health Information Management 0003 Medical Terminology
Health Information Management 0141 U. S. Health Care System
Health Studies C089 International Health
Health Studies Course at the 100 level or above
History 274  History of American Science
History W370 History of American Medicine
Philosophy C077/H097 Science in Context
Philosophy 0216 Philosophy of Science
Philosophy 0249  Ethics in Medicine
Political Science 0155 Health Policy
Psychology Courses at the 100 level or above.
Religion 352 Religion and Bioethics
Religion W343 Death and Dying

*Students in the Health Track must complete at least four of the starred sociology courses above in fulfilling their degree requirements.

Minor Requirements

To obtain a minor in sociology, students must complete 18 hours of courses in sociology. Sociology C050/X050 or C051/X051 is required. Of the remaining 15 hours, 12 must be at the 0200 level or higher. 

Distinction in Major

To receive Distinction in Sociology, a student must receive, at a minimum, a GPA of 3.5 in the combined aggregate of all courses required for the Sociology major, as well as an average of 3.25 in all other courses. 


SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE

Jonathan Holmquist, Chair

jholmqui@astro.temple.edu

215-204-8285

Augusto Lorenzino, Undergraduate Chair and Faculty Adviser

galorenz@astro.temple.edu

215-204-6035

http://www.temple.edu/spanpor

B.A. in Spanish Major Requirements

A student has three options within a major in Spanish:
I   ( Language, Literature, and Linguistics); or 
II  ( Language and Professional Studies); or
III (Education).

Degree Requirements

  • University Core curriculum. All students admitted fall, 1990 and thereafter must successfully complete the University Core requirements. 
  • College of Liberal Arts requirements. Please see CLA Requirements
Prerequisites

For options I and II, students must complete Spanish C061 (Intermediate Spanish) or the equivalent. For option III, students must complete Spanish 0052 or the equivalent.

Course Requirements

Students selecting the Spanish major must achieve competence in Spanish language skills in conjunction with qualification as outlined in Major Options I,  II, or III below. Spanish W215 (the capstone course) is a requirement of all majors, and a prerequisite for all 0300 level courses. 

MAJOR OPTION I: (Language, Literature and/or Linguistics)

This option is designed for students who wish to develop advanced language skills in the study of (1) Latin American Literature, (2) Peninsular Literature, and/or (3) Linguistics. To complete this option a total of 10 courses is required. A maximum of 7 courses may be taken at the 0100 and 0200 levels and, of these, no more than 3 may be 0100 level courses. Two Portuguese courses may be taken to substitute for one of the required 0100 or 0200 level Spanish courses. A minimum of 3 courses must be taken at the 0300 level. 

MAJOR OPTION II: Language and Professional Studies

This option is designed for students who wish to develop language and professional skills as well as an awareness of Hispanic culture. To complete this option a total of 10 courses is required. A maximum of 8 courses may be taken at the 0100 and 0200 levels; no more than three may be from the 0100 level. Three business and translation courses are required at the 0200 level as well as one of the following: 0240, 0241. Two Portuguese courses may be taken to substitute for one required 0100 or 0200 level Spanish course. A minimum of two courses must be taken at the 0300 level. 

MAJOR OPTION III: Spanish for Education

This option includes the Spanish-language courses required for certification in Spanish for Secondary Education in the School of Education at Temple, and satisfies the requirements for the Spanish major in the College of 
Liberal Arts.  To complete this option a total of ten courses is required; 
Intermediate Spanish (C061) may be included.  Specific requirements include 
two Composition and Conversation courses, one Culture and Civilization course, one Linguistics course, two Literature courses with at least one in contemporary 
literature, the Capstone course for the major (Spanish W215), and three 
additional courses. Student must take and pass two 0300-level courses. 

Distinction in Spanish

Distinction in Spanish is awarded to majors who graduate with a 3.75 in their Spanish courses and an overall GPA of at least 3.25. 

Minor in Spanish 

Prerequisite: Students must complete C061 (Intermediate Spanish) or the equivalent. 

Course requirements: Complete a total of six Spanish courses at the 0100 level or higher. A maximum of three courses may be taken at the 0100 level. A minimum of three courses must be taken at the 0200 level or higher. All literature and linguistics courses at the 0300 level may be used. 

Minor in Portuguese

Portuguese 0051 and 0052 (8 s.h.) with the remaining 12 s.h. in Portuguese intermediate or advanced courses. Two Portuguese courses must be at the 0300 level. (A student may substitute intermediate or advanced level courses for the beginning 0051 and 0 052.) 

Certificate of  Specialization in Multilingual Business and Government Studies

The Department offers a 54 hour program leading to a B.A. degree with an additional specialization in Multilingual Business and Government Studies. The program is designed for students who plan careers as interpreters and translators, employment in government agencies, or a career in business with firms that have import/export activities in Latin America. It consists of courses in the Spanish language, Business Spanish, Translation Skills, Business Administration and Economics, Political Science, and Latin American Studies. 

The program is open to all students; applicants need not be Spanish majors and no background in business subjects is required. While these courses are normally taken within the 123 hours required for the B.A. degree in the College of Liberal Arts, the program is open to students in all colleges of the University. Students from most colleges who have the proper background can usually complete the program with careful schedule planning and use of electives. 

A cumulative University average of 2.80 must be maintained. A maximum of 20 hours of transfer equivalency will be accepted. Students interested in the program should contact the Director of the Multilingual Business and Government Studies Program in the Spanish and Portuguese Department, 4th Floor, Anderson Hall (215-204-1701). 

Certificate of Specialization in Spanish

A Certificate of Specialization in Spanish is also available. The certificate requires completion of six courses, beginning with Basic Spanish and advancing to more specialized study of Spanish designed to enhance career opportunities in business, communication, government and social service. See your adviser or contact the Department for more information. 

Certificate of Specialization in Spanish and Latin American Studies for Business

This interdisciplinary certificate is designed to allow Temple students in business-related programs to develop skills and knowledge in two complementary areas so that they may compete more successfully in this growing job market. 

Course requirements: 
Four courses in Spanish at Temple, including:
1. Three of the following: 

  • 0051--Basic Spanish I
  • 0052--Basic Spanish II
  • C061--Intermediate Spanish
  • 0101--Conversational Review
  • W102--Composition and Conversation
  • 0103--Hispanic Readings
  • 0076/0176--Intensive Practice [LASS]*
  • 0209--Spanish for Spanish Speakers

2. Two courses in Latin American Studies at Temple, including: 

  • C050--Perspectives on Latin America or 0100--LASS**
  • One course above LAS 0100 (0129--Politics of Development in Latin America highly recommended).
    *   Spanish 0076 and 0176 count as two courses; each is 9 s.h., taught in connection with Latin American Studies Semester (LASS), an immersion program offered every spring. 

    **  LASS is an integration of several courses totaling 15 s.h.  9 credits are assigned to language instruction, 6 credits to culture and society, taught under LAS 100. All instruction in LASS is in Spanish. 

Certificate of Specialization in Spanish and Latino Studies for the Health and Human Services Professions

The combination of courses in this certificate program is designed to make participants especially qualified to provide health and human services to members of the Latino community. 

Course requirements: 
Four courses in Spanish at Temple, including 
1. Three of the following: 

  • 0051--Basic Spanish I
  • 0052--Basic Spanish II
  • C061--Intermediate Spanish
  • 0101--Conversational Review
  • W102--Composition and Conversation
  • 0103--Hispanic Readings
  • 0076/0176--Intensive Practice [LASS]*
  • 0209--Spanish for Spanish Speakers
2.  0212--Spanish for Health and Human Services 

Two courses in Latin American Studies at Temple, including 

C050--Perspectives on Latin America or 0100--LASS** 

One of the following:
LAS 0138--Topics in Latino Studies 
0148--Puerto Ricans in Philadelphia 

*   Spanish 0076 and 0176 count as two courses; each is 9 s.h., taught in connection with Latin American Studies Semester (LASS), an immersion program offered every spring.

**  LASS is an integration of several courses totaling 15 s.h.  9 credits are assigned to language instruction, 6 credits to culture and society, taught under LAS 100. All instruction in LASS is in Spanish.

Latin American Studies Semester Certificate and Program

Each Spring Semester the Spanish and Portuguese Department in conjunction with the Latin American Studies Center offers a 15-subject-hour immersion program in Latin American Studies and Spanish. The Program (LASS) combines 9 hours of intensive Spanish with 6 hours of study focusing on geography, history and culture in Latin America, and includes a two week trip to Mexico. Successful completion of the Program is awarded with a certificate of participation. Applications for LASS are received during October and November for the following spring. For information contact the Director of Latin American Studies (215-204-7527) or the Chair of Spanish and Portuguese (215-204-8285). 

Summer Abroad in Spain: Spanish Language and Culture

Temple University offers a summer program in Girona, Spain, which provides students with the opportunity to learn the Spanish language while being immersed in that country's unique and diverse culture. The duration of the program is of 6 weeks and students can enroll for a total of six credits. For further information, contact Dr. Montserrat Piera at the Department of Spanish and Portuguese or the Office of International Programs at Temple University. 

Temple University in Brazil

This program provides students with the opportunity to learn and improve 
their Portuguese language skills while being immersed in Brazil's unique 
and diverse culture. It is based at the Universidade do Estado da Bahia, 
located in Salvador, in northeastern Brazil. The program is 6 weeks long and students can enroll for a total of six credits. For further information, contact Dr. Augusto Lorenzino at the Department of Spanish and Portuguese or the Office of International Programs at Temple University.

Gerardo Augusto Lorenzino, Ph.D.
Department of Spanish and Portuguese
1114 W. Berks Street
Philadelphia, PA 19122
Tel. 215.204.6035
galorenz@temple.edu

 

 

Junior Year and/or Summer School Abroad

Students declaring concentration in the department may, under certain conditions, spend the junior year studying abroad. Application for permission to study abroad may be made during the second semester of the sophomore year. Only well-qualified students may be granted credit from Temple University after submitting proper credentials for established foreign study programs at institutions approved by the Department. 

Students interested in a junior year abroad, or a summer school abroad, should discuss their plans early with their faculty adviser and the Chair of the Department. 


WOMEN'S STUDIES

 

Rickie Sanders, Director
rsanders@astro.temple.edu

215-204-4874

Rebecca Alpert, Co-Director and Advising Coordinator

ralpert@nimbus.temple.edu

215-204-6953

http://www.temple.edu/womenstu

At the core of Womenís Studies is an examination of the social, historical, and cultural roots of gender identity and gender equality and inequality.

B.A. Major Requirements

Twelve courses are required for the major.  

  • One-three lower level courses (choose from the following courses)

A maximum of three of these courses may count towards the major.

WS C051 or X051

 Introduction to Womenís Studies

3 s.h

WS C065

 Gender and History

 3 s.h.

WS C076

 American Womenís Lives

 3 s.h.

WS C080

 International Womenís Writing

 3 s.h.

WS C081 or X081

 Men and Women in American Society

 3 s.h.

  • WS 0100    Essential Issues in Womenís Studies    3 s.h. 
  • Six-eight upper level courses - Among those courses, majors must take two designated upper level courses designed for students to learn how to write a research paper. Majors will also be permitted to take two of these six-eight courses outside Womenís Studies (courses that are not cross listed) with permission of the advising coordinator. These courses must support the studentís academic or professional growth in conjunction with the major. (e.g., a research methods course in another discipline for which the student will write on a subject related to gender or courses taken in a study abroad program.) 
  • The final requirement is a two-course sequence.

This sequence should be taken during the majorís last three semesters of enrollment. Students will select a field assignment with the assistance of the advising coordinator.

WS 0299     Field Work               3 s.h.

WS W300   Research Seminar     3 s.h.

Minor Requirements

Seven course are required for the minor.

  • WS 0100    Essentials in Womenís Studies    3 s.h.
  • 6 courses at least 3 of which are at the upper level.

Certificate of Specialization

Designed for students outside the College of Liberal Arts who want to pursue a Women's Studies oriented career. Requirements for the certificate are:

  • WS X051    Introduction to Women's Studies    3 s.h.
  • WS 0299     Field Work                                    3 s.h.
  • Two electives in Women's Studies, with at least one at or above the 100 level.

Distinction in Major

Women's Studies students may graduate with a distinction in the major if they have a GPA of 3.5 or better in the major, a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better, and successfully complete an honors thesis (minimum 3 credits) under the supervision of a faculty member from Women's Studies.

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