02618/Crafts

Lower Division Courses

0003-0004. Three Dimension (4 s.h. each course) F S.

A foundation course paired with Painting, Drawing and Sculpture (PDS) 0003 introducing ideas fundamental to three-dimensional work and thought. Only simple materials such as paper, cardboard, wire, plaster, wood, and clay are used.

Upper Division Courses

0102. Fiber Structures I: Dimensional Form (3 s.h.)

An introduction to textiles through hand-manipulated processes such as knotting, felting, wrapping and basketry. The course approaches techniques from both historical and contemporary approaches with an emphasis on working sculpturally.

0105. Fabric Pattern and Image I (3 s.h.)

An investigation of the unique properties of dye color application on fabric. Discharge, resisting and patterning techniques are covered, with an emphasis on color relationships and imagery.

0107-0207. Plastics for Jewelry (3 s.h. each course)

An introduction to the forming, fabricating, and casting of plastic materials. The student works with acrylics, polyesters, urethanes, epoxies, and silicones, and learns to combine these materials with metal.

0108-0208. Electroforming Workshop (3 s.h. each course)

Prerequisite: One year of metalworking experience.

Students with prior metalworking experience have the opportunity to explore nontraditional electrochemical processes for the creation of unique forms in metal.

0109-0209. Color in Metal (3 s.h. each course)

Aspects of applying color to metals or changing the existing color of metallic surfaces are explored. Students are introduced to the new techniques, color anodizing aluminum, and the space-age metals titanium and niobium. Application of color resin and vitreous enamels are also examined.

0110-0210. Blacksmithing (3 s.h. each course)

An introduction to hot forging. Both ferrous and non-ferrous metal used in an investigation of function and sculptural form.

0113-0213. Machine Tool Processes (3 s.h. each course)

The lathe, milling machine, drill press, and other machines are examined for their creative potential.

0115-0215. Production Processes (3 s.h. each course)

Introduction to production processes and marketing. Students will design and produce an object in quantity and be assisted in the marketing of that object.

0117. Off Loom Structure I (3 s.h.)

Single and multiple element structures including wrapping, netting, knotting, plaiting, ropemaking and felting. Both two- and three-dimensional construction will be explored.

0118. Woven Structure I (3 s.h.)

An introduction to weaving using the floor loom. Tapestry and other structural techniques will be taught. Both an historical and a contemporary approach will be encouraged.

0133-0233. CAD/CAM I Computer-Aided-Design/Computer-Aided-Manufacture (3 s.h. each course)

In this introduction to CAD/CAM the student learns to: customize the modeling environment; create basic graphic objects-lines, circles, arcs, curves, solids, and surfaces; draw with precision, using coordinate input and merge models to different file formats; create, test and verify solid models in STL file format for production of rapid prototypes; and, render models.

0134-0234. CAD/CAM II Computer-Aided-Design/Computer-Aided-Manufacture (3 s.h. each course)

Prerequisite: CAD/CAM 0133 or 0233.

This course is a continuation of CAD/CAM I. The primary objective of this course is to create a solids model in Rhino. The model is then verified for accuracy using Magics RP and prepared for rapid prototyping (RP). Students create a ring model to be produced via the Sanders Model Maker wax rapid prototyping system. These models are verified using Sanders Model/Works and Bview software. The student is assisted in having their model produced and cast. The concepts and principles of computer rendering the 3-D models is a major component of this course. Photorealistic renderings of the student’s Rhino models are produced using the NuGraf rendering system. Course Software: Rhinoceros, Magics RP, ModelWorks, Bview and NuGraf.

0137-0237-0337. Glass Construction, Topic: Kiln Working (3 s.h. each course)

Predominantly a course in glass object-making. This class will provide beginning instruction through advanced tutelage in kiln forming techniques. Traditional and contemporary processes covered include frit casting from both clay and wax positives, fusing, and slumping. Moldmaking is emphasized and a variety of refractory mold materials will be introduced. A repertoire of finishing processes will be offered to aid in taking the kiln worked object to its completed state.

0138-0238-0338. Glass Construction, Topic: Cold Glass (3 s.h. each course)

This studio course provides comprehensive instruction with regard to "cold" glass-working techniques. 2-D and 3-D glass objects will be constructed with the employment of a variety of procedures without the introduction of heat. The classes will encourage the areas of student expertise. Thus, information on surface treatment (glass texturing), joining (glass to glass, to other materials), and finishing processes will be covered. Proficiency in the creation of structurally and conceptually cohesive objects is stressed.

0141/0241/0341. Hot Glass, Topic: Blowing (3 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Crafts 0158.

A glass course primarily for the glass major who wants to learn advanced skills in off-hand techniques for blowing traditional and non-traditional glass forms. Advanced color work, team work and advanced methods for combining complicated glass forms will be a major component of this studio class. Six hours of studio work outside of class time is required.

0142/0242/0342. Hot Glass, Topic: Casting (3 s.h. each course)

A glass class that will provide beginning advanced instruction on using molten glass as a material for casting into a wide variety of mold materials. Methods of mold setup, methods for pouring hot glass and finishing glass will be provided and demonstrated. A survey of contemporary craft-artists using these materials and methods will be shown. Presentation and evaluation of finished work will be an important aspect of this studio course.

0151-0152. Beginning Ceramics (3 s.h. each course) F S.

Wheel thrown and hand formed pottery and sculpture, glazing, and firing, with an emphasis on design as an organic outgrowth of the ceramic process.

Note: This course is a prerequisite for all other ceramic courses.

0153-0154. Jewelry (3 s.h. each course) F S.

An introduction to the design and fabrication of small scale functional objects and jewelry, exploring metalsmithing, casting, mold making, machine use, anodizing, linkages, plastics and finishing.

0157/0257. Plastics for Jewelry and Objects (3 s.h. each course)

An introduction to forming, fabricating, joining, and casting of a variety plastic materials. This 20th and 21st century material is studied for its visual and artistic potential, as well as its applications in product design. Students learn to combine these materials with metals and other media.

0158. Introduction to Glass (3 s.h.) F S.

An introductory studio class for students who are interested in learning the basic processes of off-hand glass working techniques. A brief history of glass, studio operations and studio safety will be covered in slide lectures and studio demonstrations. Glassblowing, mold blowing, glass finishing and team work will be emphasized through demonstrations and studio work outside of class time is required.

Note: This course is a prerequisite for all glass courses.

0159/0259. Metalsmithing (3 s.h. each course)

Advanced metal forming techniques are explored. Students are encouraged to produce functional hollowware and objects of a non-traditional source.

0160. Intermediate Ceramics (3 s.h.) F S.

Creative problems in pottery for the student who has mastered use of the wheel and basic ceramic processes. Kiln firing techniques and simple glaze formulation will also be covered.

0168. Intermediate Glass (3 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Crafts 0158.

An advanced introductory studio course for learning off-hand blowing techniques. Advanced team work, finishing glass objects, and studio operations will be demonstrated the use of color and its application to hot glass will be introduced.

0169-0259. Metalsmithing (3 s.h. each course)

Advanced metal forming techniques are explored. Students are encouraged to produce functional hollowware and objects of a non-traditional source.

0173-0263. Enameling (3 s.h. each course)

All basic enameling techniques which include Plique A Jour, Limoges, Champeleve, Bustail, etc. The course explores the use of synthetic resins as an addition to the enamelist's repertoire.

0189/0289. Photo Processes and Etching Jewelry (3 s.h. each course)

All aspects of the photographic processes that can be used with metals and plastics are introduced. This includes photo-resist techniques for metal etching, plating, and anodizing, along with photo embedments in plastics

0191-0291. Lapidary and Stone Setting (3 s.h. each course)

Advanced lapidary processes are demonstrated which include the cutting and polishing of faceted stones designed by the student. Traditional and innovative stone setting methods are also explored.

0197-0297. Casting (3 s.h. each course)

Controlled inertial (centrifugal) casting, rubber moldmaking, wax injection, vacuum assisted casting, high frequency melting, sand casting, and other specialized casting processes are used to produce jewelry and other objects in precious and non-precious metal.

0201. Field Internship in Glass (3 s.h.)

This program has been established to provide practical experience for students in the Glass area that is relevant and useful to the student’s course of study. This experience may include: the creation of crafts, art sales, design; the acquisition of business skills, as well as the participation in retail and wholesale craft exhibitions. A written proposal must be developed and agreed upon in advance of the beginning of the semester, describing the intended setting of the Field Internship and the time commitment which must equal at least eight-ten hours per week for the full semester (13 weeks).

Note: In order to get credit for this Field Internship, the student must agree to write a comprehensive paper as described in the guidelines for the Tyler Field Internship Program.

0202. Field Internship in Ceramics (3 s.h.)

This program has been established to provide practical experience for students in the Ceramics area that is relevant and useful to the student's course of study. This experience can include: the creation of craft, art sales, design, the acquisition of business skills, as well as the participation in retail and wholesale craft exhibitions.

Note: In order to get credit for this Field Internship, the student must agree to write a comprehensive paper as described in the guidelines for the Tyler Field Internship Program.

0203. Field Internship in Fibers (3 s.h.)

This program has been established to provide practical experience for students in the Fibers area that is relevant and useful to the studís course of study. This experience can include: the creation of craft, art sales, design, the acquisition of business skills, as well as the participation in retail and wholesale craft exhibitions. A written proposal must be developed and agreed upon in advance of the beginning of the semester, describing the intended setting of the Field Internship and the time commitment which must equal at least eight-ten hours per week for the full semester (13 weeks).

Note: In order to get credit for this Field Internship, the student must agree to write a comprehensive paper as described in the guidelines for the Tyler Field Internship Program.

0205. Fabric Coloring and Embellishment (3 s.h.)

0206. Mixed Media Construction: Structural Embellishment (3 s.h.)

This course focuses on the stitch as a form of mark-making, exploring surface and structural applications such as embroidery, applique and quilting. Image transfers on cloth and free beading will also be explored. Projects will emphasize combining these "traditional" techniques with contemporary art issues and practices.

0217. Off Loom Structure II (3 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Crafts 0117.

Emphasis will be on three-dimensional constructions using nontraditional materials. Miniature forms will also be explored.

0218. Woven Structure II (3 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Crafts 0118.

Exploration of dyeing and printing including space dyed ikat and printing on the woven surface.

W220. Art Workshop in Scotland (3 s.h.) Core: WI.

A four-week summer studio art workshop on location in Scotland. After an introductory week in London visiting museums, contemporary art galleries, and art schools, students spend the next three weeks working in studio facilities in Scotland at the Glasgow School of Art. Artists from that institution and Tyler School of Art staff conduct a series of intensive workshops in a variety of media. The students' travel and research experiences while in Great Britain are utilized as sources of inspiration for the development of their art work in general and for an exhibition to be held at Tyler in the fall.

0221. Tyler Art Workshop in Scotland (3 to 6 s.h.)

Tyler Art Workshop in Scotland is a four-week studio art workshop in London and Scotland in conjunction with the Glasgow School of Art, Glasgow, Scotland. The students use their travel and research experiences from the first three weeks of the trip as source material for the creation of finished work during the final week of the program.

0241. Hot Glass, Topic: Blowing (3 s.h.) F S.

Prerequisite: Introduction to Glass 0158.

An advance course in off-hand blowing where specialized techniques for glass object making are explored and developed. Specialized color techniques are introduced. Glass tools, processes, and methods for glassblowing are demonstrated in the studio during this class.

0242. Hot Glass, Topic: Hot Pour (3 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Introduction to Glass 0158.

This course focuses on the use of molten glass as a material for casting into mold materials. The use of sand, graphite, steels and wood are demonstrated in ways of making molds for hot glass pour. The studio use of tools, equipment, and annealing are demonstrated in this class.

0243/0343. Advanced Glass, Topic: Seminar (3 s.h. each course) F S.

This studio course is for the Junior (243) or senior (0343) glass major. The emphasis is on historical glass research topics. A survey of glass making from ancient cultures to early American glass will be covered by slide lectures, museum visits, and research projects.

0244/0344. Advanced Glass, Topic: Visiting Artist Series (3 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Introduction to Glass 0158, Intermediate Glass 0168, Advanced Glass 0243.

This course is for the junior (0244) and senior (0344) glass major.

0245. Glass Workshop (3 s.h.) F S SS.

An intensive daily studio course designed for beginning students through advanced glass majors. This studio course meets each day. Studio demonstrations in all hot glass applications are the focus. Individual problem solving through guided team work will be emphasized.

Note: Three hours of studio work outside of class each day is required.

0247. Glass Seminar (3 s.h.)

This course is designed to examine issues that are relative to the advanced glass student. Technical lectures and assignments are part of the focus. Practical information is shared and discussed, and a survey of contemporary glass forms and concept s is also explored. While this ongoing seminar evolves, the students are individually pursuing their own work as related in their statement of intent.

0248. Ceramic Mold Making (3 s.h.)

Students produce both two and three-piece plaster molds to be used in the slip casting process for the production of multiple ceramic items. The course examines both the historical and contemporary use of molds and slip casting. During the semester the students are encouraged to incorporate the use of slip casting into their current style of work.

0249. Primitive Ceramics (3 s.h.)

A course concentrating on the use of primitive ceramic techniques. This course is structured to develop skills in locating and refining clay, forming processes, and a variety of low temperature firing processes. This course utilizes many of the pottery techniques of Native American ceramics as one of the sources of investigation.

0251. Two-Dimensional Ceramics (3 s.h.)

The making and production of tiles and other essentially two-dimensional ceramic items for application to interior and exterior architecture. Several processes, techniques and firing methods are explored. These include both high, low temperature firing, mold, and hand pressing techniques. The history of tiles and ceramic wall reliefs are surveyed with concentration on relevant periods and countries.

0253-0254. Ceramic Materials (3 s.h. each course)

An advanced level examination of ceramic processes, the formulation of clay bodies and glazes, common firing practices, and the construction of kilns. The course is required for the ceramics major.

Note: The course intended for ceramic majors.

0258. Porcelain (3 s.h.)

A ceramic course that covers the special properties of porcelain clay. Various hand building, throwing and casting techniques are explored as well as experiments in glazing and the preparation of clay bodies. Historical importance of porcelain is reviewed along with many contemporary uses of this material in vessel and sculptural forms.

0261. Advanced Throwing and Wheel Work (3 s.h.)

A course concentrating on the use of the potter's wheel, using a problem-solving approach. Structured to develop the necessary skills to enable the student in making personal aesthetic choices with regard to three-dimensional ceramic forms created on the wheel.

0262. Ceramic Structures (3 s.h.)

The approach to this course is to utilize ceramic materials for the creation of sculpture. The history of ceramic sculpture as well as contemporary movements are stressed. Various techniques used in ceramic sculpture, techniques and materials used in conjunction with ceramics are explored.

0265-0266. Junior Metalsmithing (3 s.h.)

Advanced problems exploring the design and fabrication of functional objects and jewelry. Three-dimensional sheet metal development, fabrication of hollow structures, mechanisms, linkage systems and mold making will be introduced.

0267-0268. Tyler Metals Workshop, England/Scotland (0 - 6 s.h.)

A four–week summer art workshop in England and Scotland. Students first fly to London for an introductory week visiting contemporary metalsmiths, museums and galleries, followed by three weeks traveling in Scotland, working in studio facilities operated by the Glasgow School of Art. The course structure is directed toward studio art majors with a concentration in Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM, and emphasizes the creation of artwork based on the student’s cross-cultural experiences during the trip. Access to English and Scottish metalsmiths and artist/educators, travel and museum visits supplement the curriculum.

0271. Ceramic Workshop (3 s.h.) SS.

Offered on Saturdays or evenings to ceramic majors, and M.Ed. students who have successfully completed their beginning ceramics requirement. In addition to being a course where a variety of skill levels and aesthetic points of view can interact, the course itself rotates through several specialty topics including advanced throwing, wood/salt firing, and advanced hand-building.

0273-0274. Advanced Fiber (3 s.h. each course)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

This course addresses problems in fibers for the advanced student with an emphasis on individual research projects and the development of work.

0282. Silkscreen on Fabric I (3 s.h.)

Screen printed imagery on fabric using various stencil techniques, including photo-emulsion with computer generated imagery. Both dye and pigment printing will be covered, with an emphasis on color relationships and the construction of imagery and texture.

0291. Lapidary and Stone Setting (3 s.h.)

Advanced lapidary processes are demonstrated which include the cutting and polishing of faceted stones designed by the student. Traditional and innovative stone setting methods are also explored.

0292. Metals Concepts and Criticism (3 s.h.)

0293-0294-0393-0394. Advanced Ceramics (3 s.h. each course)

Problems in ceramics for the advanced student with emphasis on individual research projects and upon portfolio development.

0295. Machine Tool Processes (3 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Crafts 0113 Machine Tool Processes.

A continuation of machine tool processes, this course is designed to enable students to gain greater proficiency in the use of machine tools.

0306. Structural Embellishment II (3 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Crafts 0206.

An exploration of clothing and costume construction for weavables or performance work.

0317. Off Loom Structure III (3 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Crafts 0117 and 0217.

Environmental and installation explorations using off loom and other construction techniques..

0318. Woven Structure III (3 s.h.)

Prerequisite: Crafts 0118 and 0218.

An exploration of advanced weaving techniques: computer loom drafting and weaving, three-dimensional investigations and structural manipulations.

0361. Advanced Lapidary and Stone Setting (3 s.h.)

Further advanced lapidary processes are demonstrated which include the cutting and polishing of faceted stones designed by the student. Traditional and innovative stone setting methods are also explored.

0363-0364. Senior Metals and Plastics (3 s.h. each course)

The course introduces the student to portfolio preparation. An independent senior project is also encouraged.

0370. Field Internship Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM (3 s.h.)

The program has been established to provide practical experience for students in the Metals/Jewelry/CAD-CAM area that is relevant and useful to the studentís course of study. This experience can include creative approaches to the craft, sales, design, the acquisition of business skills, as well as the participation in retail and wholesale craft exhibitions.

Note: In advance of the beginning of the semester, a written proposal must be developed and agreed upon. The proposal must describe the intended setting of the Field Internship and the time commitment, which must be at least 8-10 hours per week for the full semester (13 weeks). In order to get credit for this Field Internship, the student must agree to write a comprehensive paper as described in the guidelines for the Tyler Field Internship Program.

0371-0372. Senior Seminar in Metals (3 s.h. each course)

This course provides seniors who are interested in going on to graduate school with an opportunity to experience the responsibilities and rewards of graduate education by participation in the graduate metals seminar. These students, selected by the faculty, are also provided with a workspace in the graduate metals studio.

0382. Advanced Fabric Printing (3 s.h.)

Screen printed imagery on fabric using various stencil techniques, including photo-emulsion with computer constructed imagery. Both dye and pigment printing will be covered, with an emphasis on color relationships and the construction of imagery and texture.

W387. Business Practices in Crafts (3 s.h.) Core: WI.

All aspects of business practices as they relate to the craftsperson are covered. The course includes the pricing of work, taxes, contracts, bookkeeping for small businesses, marketing, artist-gallery relations, studio operations, legal problems, insurance, advertising, and publicity . The student will become familiar with the computer's use in a business environment.

Note: This is a writing intensive course.

0393-0394. Advanced Ceramics (3 s.h. each course)

Problems in ceramics for the advanced student with emphasis on individual research projects with emphasis upon portfolio development.