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ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
Introduction

General Information
Academic Advising
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College Graduation Requirements
Student Contact Information
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ProgramS Of Study

Certificate in Environmental Sustainability
Minor in Ecological Planning & Design
Certficate & Minor in Sustainable Food Systems
COMMUNITY & REGIONAL PLANNING
Bachelor of Science in Community Development
Minor in Community Development
Minor in Community & Regional Planning
LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE AND HORTICULTURE
Horticulture
Bachelor of Science
Minor in Environmental Horticulture
Associate in Science/ General Option
Associate in Science/ Business Option
Certificates
   Horticultural Therapy
   Landscape Plants
Bachelor of Science
Minor in Landscape Studies

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  Academic Programs / Environmental Design

School of Environmental Design

Founded 2000

Teresa Scott Soufas, Dean

School location:
580 Meetinghouse Road
Ambler, PA 19002

267-468-8000
ambler@temple.edu
www.ambler.temple.edu

See the Ambler Campus Section of this Bulletin for more information on services, facilities, and student life.

Introduction
Accreditations
Admissions Information
Financial Aid and Scholarships
Special Programs and Facilities
Awards for Achievement and Honor Societies
Student Associations


Introduction

Temple University Ambler has been connected to sustainable concepts and environmental stewardship for over a century. In June 2000, the Temple University Board of Trustees formally recognized Ambler College (now the School of Environmental Design) located at the Ambler Campus, as the 17th academic unit of Temple University. This designation provided Ambler College with the ability to plan and develop unique programs consistent with its mission. In July 2009, Ambler College was renamed the School of Environmental Design in the College of Liberal Arts. The School of Environmental Design (SED) is the home to the Department of Community and Regional Planning, the Department of Landscape Architecture and Horticulture, and the Center for Sustainable Communities (See Special Programs and Facilities below), with plans for future academic programs to be added under the school umbrella.

The mission of the School of Environmental Design is the enhancement of the relationship between individuals, social patterns, and political systems and the natural, built, and cultural environments of contemporary life. The School of Environmental Design upholds the environmental traditions established by the Pennsylvania School of Horticulture for Women and carried forward by our founding Department of Landscape Architecture and Horticulture. As Temple University's 17th college, the School of Environmental Design has a commitment to the health of communities, the preservation and appreciation of the natural and historical landscape, and the recognition of the connections between the natural and constructed worlds. (Adopted by the Faculty, Ambler College [now the School of Environmental Design], December, 2000.)  The School of Environmental Design core values are: student-centered learning, community engagement, and environmental responsibility.

The Department of Landscape Architecture and Horticulture traces its origins to the Pennsylvania School of Horticulture for Women, founded in 1911 at Ambler Campus. Originally, the department offered only two-year Associate degree programs, but in 1988 added two four-year degree programs in Landscape Architecture and Horticulture. In Fall 2010 it added a Master of Landscape Architecture (M.L.Arch.) degree. The department's evolution has combined theory with practice, continuing the tradition of blending art and science with practical experience. Committed to excellence in ecologically-based education, the department provides students with the knowledge and understanding of sustainable environments. Through an ecological approach to planning, design, development, and care of the land, the programs in Landscape Architecture and Horticulture promote the development of skills to improve the quality of urban, suburban, and rural communities. Courses and programs are offered that utilize the 187-acre Ambler Campus as both an arboretum and a living laboratory for faculty and students. Students also have the opportunity to conduct research in a state-of-the-art greenhouse.

Established in 2001, the Department of Community and Regional Planning supports the preparation of skilled practitioners for the dynamic and growing fields of community development and community and regional planning.  Through the Bachelor of Science in Community Development, students learn to understand and think critically about the social, political, economic, and cultural dynamics shaping various types of communities.  Particular emphasis is given to empowering disadvantaged communities to address inequalities and improve their long-term social, economic, and environmental sustainability. The Master of Science in Community and Regional Planning cultivates an understanding of the physical and economic context of planning, sensitivity to the social and environmental impact of public policies, and knowledge of governmental structures as they apply to planning.  Both degree programs enable students to lead efforts to create and maintain healthy, sustainable communities by providing a broad-based understanding and awareness of multi-dimensional aspects of urban, suburban, and rural community challenges and the means of effecting change from both grass-roots and public policy perspectives.

The Ambler Campus continues to be the home of the School of Environmental Design and is also a teaching site for many courses and full degree programs sponsored by other schools and colleges of Temple University. See the Degree Programs Chart for a listing of the full degree programs and the Ambler Campus section for additional information on campus facilities and services.

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Accreditations

The Bachelor of Science in Landscape Architecture and the first professional Master of Landscape Architecture programs are both accredited by the Landscape Architectural Accreditation Board of the American Society of Landscape Architects. 

The Master of Science program in Community and Regional Planning is accredited by the Planning Accreditation Board.

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Admissions Information

Ambler Admissions Office

267-468-8100
ambler@temple.edu

www.temple.edu/ambler/admissions/

A strong interest in the environment, planning, and/or design is highly desirable for students who enroll in all programs offered by the School of Environmental Design. Students interested in Community Development also should have a desire to develop computer, social science, and communications skills. Applicants to the Landscape Architecture and Horticulture programs, depending on the intended area of study, should have a background that includes courses in art, geometry, biology, and geography.

Due to the sequential nature of the required studio classes, students pursuing the Landscape Architecture degree will need to attend for at least seven semesters regardless of the amount of transfer credits accumulated, unless they are transfer students from another Landscape Architecture program.

Lehigh Carbon Community College (LCCC) Agreement

In 2009 Lehigh Carbon Community College and the School of Environmental Design signed a program-to–program articulation agreement to facilitate the transfer of LCCC students with an Associate's in Science in Natural Science-Horticulture and Plant Science to the School of Environmental Design Bachelor of Science in Horticulture program.  For details, call the Office of Academic Advising at 268-468-8200.

Longwood Gardens Agreement

Students who graduate from the Longwood Gardens Professional Gardener Program and are admissible to Temple University may receive credits toward the Bachelor of Science degree in Horticulture. This agreement is based on an assessment of prior learning for the completion of the Longwood program and is not a course by course articulation.  Call the Ambler Office of Academic Advising at 267-468-8200 or visit www.temple.edu/vpus/transfer/agreements/longwood.html for detailed information.  Note: Since programs and requirements are subject to change, students are advised to consult with an advisor at Longwood Gardens.

For a listing of all Temple University articulation agreements, go to www.temple.edu/vpus/transfer/agreements.htm.

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Financial Aid and Scholarships

In addition to assistance from the Department of Student Financial Services, there are several scholarships and grants-in-aid that are available only to School of Environmental Design students: Horticulture, Landscape Architecture, Community Development, and Community and Regional Planning. Also see the Financial Aid section of this Bulletin.

      

W. B. Saul High School of Agricultural Sciences Scholarships

Two scholarships, the Robert Hunt Scholarship and the William Mifflin Scholarship, are available to students graduating from Philadelphia's W. B. Saul High School who are admissible to Temple University and wish to study Horticulture, Landscape Architecture, or Community Development. Interested Saul students should contact the principal of the high school for information.

 

Scholarships for All School of Environmental Design Students

Peter G. Schlotterer and Elizabeth M. Zipf Scholarships are awarded to students with financial need, with preference for giving four or more $13,000 scholarships each year, based on need, to:  one undergraduate student enrolled in either the Landscape Architecture or Horticulture program;  one graduate student enrolled in the Master’s of Landscape Architecture program;  one graduate student enrolled in the Community and Regional Planning program;  and one undergraduate or graduate student who is either taking more than 51% of his or her courses at Ambler or one graduate or undergraduate student enrolled in the School of Environmental Design.                        

 

Grants and Scholarships for Community and Regional Planning Students

Recipients are selected by faculty members in the Department of Community and Regional Planning; there are no applications.

  • Arthur F. Loeben Scholarship in Community and Regional Planning: awarded to undergraduate or graduate students who plan to enter or continue in the Community and Regional Planning programs.
  • Toward Sustainability Scholarship: provides support for a sophomore or junior majoring in Community Development or Community and Regional Planning who has demonstrated a commitment to community service. Recipients must have a minimum grade point average of 2.75 or higher.

 

Grants and Scholarships for Landscape Architecture and Horticulture Students

Applications for the following are available in the Department of Landscape Architecture and Horticulture office and at www.temple.edu/ambler/ac_services/scholarshipslah.htm.

  • Honorable Judge David Addy Scholarship: provides tuition assistance for a current student enrolled in the School of Environmental Design, majoring in Horticulture, with financial need and a grade point average of 2.5 or above.          
  • Wilmer Atkinson Memorial Scholarship: provides tuition assistance of varying amounts based on academic performance and financial need.
  • Louise and James Bush-Brown Alumni Scholarship: presented annually by the Alumni Association of the School of Environmental Design to a current sophomore or junior based on character, worthiness, interest in chosen vocation, and academic excellence during the past year.
  • John Collins Academic Scholarship: awarded to one junior in Landscape Architecture and one junior in Horticulture based on financial need, demonstrated leadership ability, and commitment to interdisciplinary collaboration.
  • Barry and Denise Cyphers Horticulture Scholarship: awarded to a Horticulture student based on financial need.
  • Doylestown Nature Club Scholarship: awarded annually based on academic performance and financial need. Preference is given to students from Bucks County.
  • John Paul Endicott Summer Internship: annual internship for a Temple Ambler student to manage the food crops garden and the volunteers, to harvest the produce and distribute to local area food cupboards, and to assist with events.
  • Lou Henry Hoover Girl Scout Scholarship: awarded annually to a student who has been active in the Girl Scouts for at least five years and who completes an endorsement sheet obtained through the Girl Scouts Council, and has good academic standing, aptitude for horticulture, and financial need.
  • Horticulture/Landscape Architecture Alumni Scholarship: funded by the Alumni Association of the School of Environmental Design and awarded to a full-time student who has completed half of the credit requirement for the major, based on financial need, academic achievement, and volunteer service contributing to the well-being of the Ambler gardens and greenhouse. (Note: Recipients are not eligible for the Louise and James Bush-Brown Alumni Scholarship.)
  • Larkin Family Scholarship: renewable scholarships awarded annually to students from Maryland based on financial need.
  • Jane R. Martin Memorial Scholarship: awarded to students entering their sophomore year based on academic achievement and demonstrated potential for future success in Horticulture or Landscape Architecture.
  • Pennsylvania Landscape and Nursery Association (PLNA) Foundation Scholarship: tuition award to a Horticulture major, in year two of the Associate's degree program or in year three or four of the Bachelor's degree program, with a grade point average of at least 3.0 in the major and at least 2.5 cumulatively, who has excelled in projects demonstrating ability to apply the knowledge gained to real-life situations. Students are nominated by department faculty.
  • Peter G. Schlotterer Ecological Restoration Scholarship: awarded annually to junior or senior students who reside in southeastern Pennsylvania and demonstrate commitment to environmental preservation and restoration. The scholarships are based on academic performance and financial need.
  • Solomon Scholarship for Academic Excellence in Landscape Architecture: recognizes a minority and/or female student in Landscape Architecture who demonstrates high academic achievement and financial need.
  • Lenora Friesleben Vaughan Scholarship: awarded annually to a student entering the sophomore year, based on academic performance and financial need.
  • Dr. Eugene Udell Scholarship Endowment Fund: established in 2009 by the Udell Family and Friends to remember the first dean of the Ambler Campus, it provides scholarships to students in Landscape Architecture and/or Horticulture who demonstrate academic achievement and financial need.
  • Val Udell Scholarship: awarded to a student enrolled in Landscape Architecture or Horticulture who demonstrates financial need and academic achievement.
  • Woman's National Farm and Garden Association, National Level, Scholarship: scholarships awarded annually to female student(s) based on academic performance and financial need.
  • Woman's National Farm and Garden Association, Pennsylvania Division: scholarship awarded annually to a female student, preferably from western Pennsylvania, based on academic performance and financial need.

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Special Programs and Facilities

 

Ambler Arboretum of Temple University
Jenny Rose Carey, Director

Anne Brennan, Horticulture and Ambler Arboretum Supervisor

Pauline Hurley-Kurtz, R.L.A., A.S.L.A., M.L.A., Academic Director

267-468-8400
www.temple.edu/ambler/arboretum/index.htm

The Temple University Ambler Campus has a long history and rich tradition of horticulture and landscape design. Established as the Pennsylvania School of Horticulture for Women in 1911, the 187-acre campus represents a unique mix of natural and designed landscapes.

The gardens and campus serve as an excellent outdoor teaching laboratory for numerous classes and as a source of inspiration for students, faculty, and visitors. The campus was officially designated an arboretum in March 2000.  Now known as the Ambler Arboretum of Temple University, this historic, public garden continues to develop as a living laboratory. The formal gardens have been revitalized to express the character of their original design, and many new garden additions are included throughout the grounds.

As the home of Temple University's Department of Landscape Architecture and Horticulture, the Ambler Campus has a myriad of learning gardens, including a ground cover garden, native plant garden, formal gardens, green roof garden, rock wall, woodland garden, sustainable wetland garden, trial garden, the Viola Anders Herb Garden, the Philip A. and Barbara F. Albright Winter Garden, the Ernesta Ballard Healing Garden with labyrinth, the Colibraro Conifer Garden, and large perennial borders. The arboretum's three areas of focus are sustainability, the health benefits of gardens, and the history of women in horticulture, agriculture, and design.

Center for Sustainable Communities (CSC) at Temple University Ambler

Jeffrey Featherstone, Ph.D., Director,

Susan E. Spinella Sacks, M.S., Assistant Director

Md. Mahbubur Meenar, M.U.P., Assistant Director, Geographic Information Systems Operations and Research
www.csc.temple.edu

The Center for Sustainable Communities develops and promotes new approaches to protecting and preserving quality of life through sustainable development, balancing the relationship between environmental integrity, economic prosperity, and social equity. It was designed to build on Temple University Ambler's strengths in horticulture and landscape architecture and to draw upon the expertise of all Temple University faculty. A working resource for government agencies, community organizations, and developers, the center provides objective information and services to improve decision-making relative to land use and water resources planning, in addition to conducting interdisciplinary research and offering educational and community outreach programs. Students in degree programs in Community Development, Community and Regional Planning, Horticulture, Landscape Architecture, and other University programs have the opportunity to take full advantage of the CSC to obtain practical experience.

Greenhouse

Anne Brennan, Horticulture and Ambler Arboretum Supervisor

Merrill Miller, Horticultural Technician

Kathryn Reber, Horticultural Technician

267-468-8191

www.temple.edu/ambler/about/facilities.htm#special


The Greenhouse provides students with a first-class facility to study plant and soil science. The energy-efficient greenhouse includes computerized climate controls and thermal blankets to protect the plants in the winter and shade them in the summer. Modern fertilizer injection systems water and fertilize plants simultaneously. In addition to being used for coursework, the greenhouse provides faculty and students with a facility to conduct horticulture research that is at the forefront of the industry.

Semester Abroad


After careful consultation with their advisors, juniors and seniors in Landscape Architecture and Horticulture and students in other School of Environmental Design programs may elect to enroll in a semester abroad. Many options are available, including the Rome or Japan campuses. For more information about Study Abroad options, see Education Abroad.

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Awards for Achievement and Honor Societies

 

Academic and Leadership Awards

All Ambler Campus students are eligible to qualify for the academic and leadership awards presented annually that are described in the Ambler Campus section of this Bulletin.

The following annual awards are available to Department of Community and Regional Planning students only.  Recipients are selected by faculty members in the Department of Community and Regional Planning; there are no applications.

  • Community and Regional Planning Award for Academic Excellence: recognizes students for outstanding achievement in the classroom. 

  • Community and Regional Planning Award for Outstanding Planning Studio Leadership: recognizes leadership among Planning Studio peers, a high level of professionalism, and a strong commitment to effective planning practice.

  • Community and Regional Planning Award for Outstanding Service: recognizes a Community and Regional Planning student for exceptional leadership and service that furthers planning education and professional practice. 

The following annual awards are available to Department of Landscape Architecture and Horticulture students only.  For applications, go to www.temple.edu/ambler/ac_services/scholarshipslah.htm

  • American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA) Student Awards of Honor and Merit: recognize students, with cumulative averages of at least 3.0, who, in the opinions of their faculty and professionals from the local ASLA chapter, have achieved a sustained level of outstanding performance in their studies and show promise of making significant contributions to the profession.
  • Viola Anders Merit Award: funded by the Alumni Association of the School of Environmental Design and presented to one graduating student and one undergraduate in Horticulture or Landscape Architecture for meritorious service in the greenhouse or the Ambler Arboretum of Temple University.
  • Bierhuizen Family Undergraduate Research Award: presented annually to a Horticulture student to help defray the costs associated with the Senior Research Project.
  • The Emma Blakiston-Frances Lukens Book Award: for the purchase of books, given to the member of the graduating class in Horticulture and Landscape Architecture who ranks highest in academic achievement.
  • John Collins Drawing Award: presented to a graduating student in Landscape Architecture, the recipient is chosen by a selection panel of three landscape architects, nominated by the Pennsylvania/Delaware Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects, including at least one Temple University School of Environmental Design representative.
  • Landscape Architecture and Horticulture Faculty Award: presented to graduating students in Horticulture (A.S.), Horticulture (B.S.), and Landscape Architecture (B.S.) for academic excellence and personal growth during their years at Ambler. 
  • Philadelphia Flower Show Commendation: recognizes students for distinguished leadership and service in the planning and implementation of the department's annual exhibit.
  • The Pi Alpha Xi National Honor Society Award: recognizes outstanding service and dedication to the department, school, and university by a member of Pi Alpha Xi.
  • School of Environmental Design Alumni Association Award: to a graduating student in Horticulture or Landscape Architecture for dedication, unselfishness, and contribution to the School of Environmental Design.

     

Landscape Architecture and Horticulture Honor Societies

Pi Alpha Xi is the national honor society for students majoring in horticulture. To be admitted to the society, a student must be a junior or senior, have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.75, and have a grade point average of at least 3.0 in all horticulture courses. This chapter sponsors several fundraising events during the academic year, the largest being the annual Plant Sale that takes place in early May.


Sigma Lambda Alpha is the honor society for landscape architecture majors. To be admitted to the society, a student must be a junior or be in the fifth semester of their program and have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.2. A student who does not qualify in the junior year may be elected in the senior year.

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Student Associations

Landscape Architecture and Horticulture Student Association

This organization, which incorporates a Pennsylvania/Delaware Student Chapter of the American Society of Landscape Architects (ASLA), holds annual fundraising events, such as plant sales, and sponsors a student-mentoring program.

 

Society for Ecological Restoration (SER)

For Master of Landscape Architecture students, this society promotes Restoration Ecology worldwide through books, online networks, and conferences.

 

Temple Planning Student Organization (T.P.S.O.)

The Temple Planning Student Organization is affiliated with the American Planning Association. Its mission is to promote awareness of the benefits of regional and sustainable planning by participating in educational programs, engaging in outreach through community service, and encouraging an open dialogue with the community at large.  Bi-weekly meetings provide a platform for students and professors to discuss current issues related to the field of planning.  

In addition, all the School of Environmental Design students may participate in the student organizations listed in the Ambler Campus section of this Bulletin.

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