Asian Studies Course Description

 

02404/Asian Studies (ASIA ST)

IMPORTANT NOTE: If an Asian Studies course is closed, click the blue 6-digit CRN to see if it is crosslisted, and then check for open seats under the departmental number. Courses count toward the major, minor, and certificate whether taken under Asian Studies or departmental numbers.

General Education

0811. Asian Behavior & Thought: Four Asian Models Shaping Your Action (3 s.h.) RCI: GB.

We incessantly engage ourselves in doing things. We are beings-at-doing. We define ourselves by the kind of actions we perform. How we act or conduct ourselves is shaped by the kind of self we construct for ourselves. And that self is shaped by the society into which we happen to be born. Self-identity, which is socially and culturally constructed by our experiences and interactions with others, carries a personal as well as an interpersonal meaning. Learn the four Asian paradigmatic cases of self-identity and examine your self in light of them.

Note: This course fulfills the Human Behavior (GB) requirement for students under Gen Ed and Individual & Society (IN) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: CR LANG 0811, PHILOS 0811, REL 0811, Chinese 0811, or Japanese 0811.

0863. Religion in the World (3 s.h.) RCI: GG.

Learn about the major religious traditions found worldwide today: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, and several indigenous traditions. Examine the beliefs, practices, and values of these groups in order to understand the worldviews and ways of life of the people who practice them. Our interdisciplinary analysis and interpretation of specific examples of religious experience will help shed light on the overall meaning of religion and human existence. We will carefully consider examples while also focusing on particular thematic issues, like cosmology and ritual. Develop appreciation for the religious vibrancy and diversity that exist in human cultures while you actively engage in the learning process through class presentation, class participation, paper-writing, and a self-selected field trip.

Note: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under Gen Ed and International Studies (IS) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed CR LANG 0863, PHILOS 0863 or REL 0863.

0868. World Society in Literature & Film (3 s.h.) RCI: GG.

(Formerly: GE-WRLD 0060.)

Learn about a particular national culture—Russian, Indian, French, Japanese, Italian, for example, each focused upon in separate sections of this course—by taking a guided tour of its literature and film. You don’t need to speak Russian, Hindu, French or Japanese to take one of these exciting courses, and you will gain the fresh, subtle understanding that comes from integrating across different forms of human expression. Some of the issues that will be illuminated by looking at culture through the lens of literature and film: Family structures and how they are changing, national self-perceptions, pivotal moments in history, economic issues, social change and diversity.

Note: This course fulfills the World Society (GG) requirement for students under Gen Ed and International Studies (IS) for students under Core.

Students cannot receive credit for this course if they have successfully completed any of the following: Arabic 0868, English 0868/0968, French 0868/0968, German 0868/0968, Hebrew 0868, Italian 0868/0968, LAS 0868/0968, Russian 0868/0968, Spanish 0868/0968, Chinese 0868/0968, or Japanese 0868/0968.

Lower Division Courses

1051. Premodern Asia (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0051.)

This course covers state, society, and culture, including religion and literature in South, Southeast, and East Asia. The diffusion of Indian and Chinese civilizations to the Khmer Empire and Vietnam in Southeast Asia and to Japan, and in Korea will be overarching themes. Themes of continuity and change over time will be explored. Comparison of state, society and culture in major Asian regions will highlight cultural adaptation and introduce the diversity of Asian cultures and institutions.

1052. Modern Asia (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0052.)

This course covers the incursions of Western imperialism, nationalism and independence movements, and postcolonial developments in South, Southeast, and East Asia. It will explore continuity and change in state, society, and culture in the major countries and regions. As in Asian Studies 1051 Premodern Asia, comparisons will shed light on similarities and differences in patterns of cultural adaptation and the diversity of Asian cultures and institutions.

1101. Introduction to World Religions (3 s.h.) F S SS. RCI: IS.

(Formerly: ASIA ST C053.)

Cross Listed with Religion 1101 (C053).

Introduction to major world religions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam) as a way of coming to know and appreciate the world views of other cultures. Attention to beliefs, values, and practices of these religions as ways of dealing with the issues basic to human life.

Note: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university Gen Ed requirements. See your advisor for further information.

1102. Introduction to Asian Religions (3 s.h.) F S SS. RCI: IS.

(Formerly: ASIA ST C050.)

Cross Listed with Religion 1102 (C050).

Introduction to the major Asian religious, philosophical, and cultural traditions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto) with emphasis on the cultural roots of each religious tradition, the analysis of its principal teachings and practices, and the major cultural expressions in religious art, ritual, poetry, music, and scriptures.

Note: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university Gen Ed requirements. See your advisor for further information. In addition to meeting the university Core International Studies requirement, this course meets the Non-Western/Third World IS requirement for Communication Sciences majors. Please note the recent update to the Core IS requirement at www.temple.edu/vpus/documents/Core_IS_UpdateFinal.pdf.

1801. Chinese and Japanese Literature in Cultural Context (3 s.h.) RCI: IS.

(Formerly: ASIA ST C084.)

Cross Listed with Critical Languages 1801 (C084).

A literary and cultural exploration of the worlds of classical and modern China and Japan. No knowledge of Chinese or Japanese language expected.

Note: (1) AS Foundation Course. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university Gen Ed requirements. See your advisor for further information. In addition to meeting the university Core International Studies requirement, this course meets the Non-Western/Third World IS requirement for Communication Sciences majors. Please note the recent update to the Core IS requirement at www.temple.edu/vpus/documents/Core_IS_UpdateFinal.pdf.

1802. Arts of Asia (3 s.h.) RCI: AR. $.

(Formerly: ASIA ST C054.)

Cross Listed with Art History 1801 (C052).

Architecture, sculpture, painting, and the functional arts of Asia (India, China, Japan, and Southeast Asia). A historical examination of the art as a religious expression and as a product of changing social and economic conditions. The material culture of Asia will be examined with an emphasis on differing world views and perspectives with which to `see` art.

Note: (1) Course fee (about $20) and field trips required. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Arts (AR) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university Gen Ed requirements. See your advisor for further information.

1901. Honors Chinese and Japanese Literature in Cultural Context (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: ASIA ST H094.)

Cross Listed with Critical Languages 1901 (H094).

A literary and cultural exploration of the worlds of classical and modern China and Japan.

Note: AS Foundation Course. No knowledge of Chinese or Japanese language expected. Requires instructor`s permission.

1902. Honors Introduction to Asian Religions (3 s.h.) F S SS.

(Formerly: ASIA ST H090.)

Cross Listed with Religion 1902 (H090).

Introduction to the major Asian religious, philosophical, and cultural traditions (Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shinto) with emphasis on the cultural roots of each religious tradition, the analysis of its principal teachings and practices, and the major cultural expressions in religious art, ritual, poetry, music, and scriptures.

Note: Requires instructor`s permission.

Upper Division Courses

2000. Special Topics in Asian Studies I (2 to 4 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0303.)

Provides a cross listing for regular and writing intensive courses in other departments when they have substantial Asian Studies content. Also used for directed readings and new courses. Click on the blue 6-digit CRN to see the topic.

Note: Cross listing arranged by Asian Studies Director.

2001. Practical Asian Society and Culture (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0100.)

Emphasizes practical Asian Studies knowledge and skills. This course provides a foundation for living and working in four countries: China, Japan, Korea, and India. It includes basic aspects of the culture of daily life and work, such as meeting people, communication patterns, entertaining, holidays, and taboos. The course also builds fundamental skills for independent research on Asian society and culture and develops basic presentation skills for use in the workplace and the Asian Studies capstone course. Student teams select and research one aspect of a society or culture, using print and online sources.

Note: Required for Asian Business & Society Certificate

2011. Survey of Japanese Literature Before 1868 (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0220.)

Cross Listed with Japanese 2011 (formerly Critical Languages 0220).

Novels, poetry, travel diaries, plays, and other genres from Japan`s Heian through Edo periods.

Note: No knowledge of Japanese language expected.

2012. Survey of Japanese Modern Literature (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0221.)

Cross Listed with Japanese 2012 (formerly Critical Languages 0221).

Major writers and works of late 19th, 20th, and 21st century Japanese literature.

Note: No knowledge of Japanese language expected.

2021. Japanese Literature in Film (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0222.)

Cross Listed with Japanese 2021 (formerly Critical Languages 0121).

Cinematic adaptations of Japanese novels and short stories, with the focus on principal figures of film and literature such as Kurosawa and Akutagawa.

Note: No knowledge of Japanese language expected.

2074. Geography of East and South Asia (3 s.h.) F S SS. RCI: IS.

(Formerly: ASIA ST C086.)

Cross Listed with Geography & Urban Studies 2074 (C086).

Introduction to the natural environments and diverse contemporary societies that comprise East, Southeast, and South Asia. Emphasis on such topics as poverty, economic development, and social conditions in India, Thailand, and the Philippines, as well as China, Japan, and Korea.

Note: (1) AS Foundation Course. (2) This course can be used to satisfy the university Core International Studies (IS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university Gen Ed requirements. See your advisor for further information. In addition to meeting the university Core International Studies requirement, this course meets the Non-Western/Third World IS requirement for Communication Sciences majors. Please note the recent update to the Core IS requirement at www.temple.edu/vpus/documents/Core_IS_UpdateFinal.pdf.

2096. Writing Seminar I (2 to 4 s.h.) F S. RCI: WI.

Provides a cross listing for regular and writing intensive courses in other departments when they have substantial Asian Studies content. Also used for directed readings and new courses. Click on the blue 6-digit CRN to see the topic.

Note: Cross listing arranged by Asian Studies Director.

2097. Asian Diaspora (3 s.h.) RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ASIA ST W191.)

Cross Listed with American Studies 2096 (W152).

Spurred by pressures of colonialism, economic change, nationalism, political repression and war as well as individual needs and adventurism, Asians have migrated from their homelands to new regions of the world within Asia as well as in Africa, the Caribbean, and Latin America, North America, and Europe. In considering the diaspora, familiar terms such as Asian, American, Community, and Nation are called into question by the multiplicity of experiences and identities of those who have ventured out from Eastern regions of the globe. This course examines the social experiences and cultural productions of Chinese, Japanese, and Filipinos who have journeyed to far flung lands and the terms that can be employed to analyze their experiences and cultures.

2098. Japanese Popular Culture and Its Literature (3 s.h.) RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ASIA ST W224.)

Cross Listed with Japanese 2096 (formerly Critical Languages W120).

Contemporary culture and literature of Japan.

Note: No knowledge of Japanese language expected.

2101. Religions of India (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0162.)

Cross Listed with Religion 2101 (0106).

An introduction to the foundations, nature, and principles of classical Hinduism. An introduction to the fundamentals of Buddhism and Jainism.

2102. Introduction to Buddhism (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0122.)

Cross Listed with Religion 2102 (0122).

Introduction to the historical development of Buddhism in relation to other East Asian religions. Topics include the Four Noble Truths of Basic Buddhism, the Hinayana Mahayana controversy over Buddhist Dharma and practice, as well as the development of Buddhist thought throughout Asia.

2107. Asian American Experiences (3 s.h.) F. RCI: RS.

(Formerly: ASIA ST R190.)

Cross Listed with American Studies 2107 (R136) and History 2107 (R163).

This introductory survey analyzes commonalities and differences in the historical and contemporary experiences of Asian American ethnic groups, Chinese, Japanese, Filipinos, Koreans, and South and Southeast Asians. It explores important ideas about the position of Asians in U.S. society, including racialization, assimilation, cultural pluralism, model minority thesis, split labor market, and internal colonialism. It begins with the arrival of the Chinese in the 1830s and ends with contemporary issues. Lectures and videos; emphasis on active student participation in learning through discussion and response papers.

Note: This course can be used to satisfy the university Core Studies in Race (RS) requirement. Although it may be usable towards graduation as a major requirement or university elective, it cannot be used to satisfy any of the university Gen Ed requirements. See your advisor for further information.

2201. Chinese Religions (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0165.)

Cross Listed with Religion 2201 (0116).

Critical study of the development of Chinese religions from the time of Confucius to Mao, including the problem of ideological continuity in contemporary China (Maoist Marxism versus Confucianism).

2217. The Vietnam War (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0256.)

Cross Listed with American Studies 2217 (0156) and History 2217 (0183).

An attempt to probe in-depth one of the most significant and controversial episodes of recent American history. The history of Vietnam since the 19th century with equal emphasis on the First and Second Indochina Wars. The impact of the war on the domestic and international scenes and its multiple legacies. Television and film from the period and guest speakers.

2238. Visual Anthropology of Modern Japan (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0338.)

Cross Listed with Anthropology 2238 (0238).

This course offers an anthropological approach to systems of visual communication that are central to understanding Japanese society and culture. Themes and perspectives from visual anthropology will be applied to visual sign systems of everyday life (writing, clothes, food, etc.), to the prevalence and influences of popular culture emphasizing mass mediated forms of manga (comic books), advertisements, etc. The course will also include ethnographic films about Japanese culture as well as a review of how Japanese culture is communicated to mass audiences through classic and contemporary feature films as well as network television. We will try to unpack some of the stereotypic reductions common to superficial knowledge of Japan and Japanese culture.

2301. Introduction to Zen Buddhism (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0168.)

Cross Listed with Religion 2301 (0115).

This course surveys the historical development of Zen Buddhism as it unfolds in India, China, and Japan, and focuses on the examination of the nature of satori experience. Analyzes its existential meaning from perspectives of therapy, Zen practice, and philosophy.

2351. Japan in a Changing World (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0244.)

Cross Listed with Political Science 2351 (0254).

An examination and analysis of the key elements that contribute to Japan's behavior in the global arena. The development of Japan's interaction with foreign powers, the psychological underpinnings of its diplomacy, and the creation of Tokyo's world view will be discussed.

2367. South Asia: Peoples, Culture, Experiences (3 s.h.) SS.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0252.)

Cross Listed with Anthropology 2367 (0267).

An introduction to the peoples and cultures of the Indian subcontinent. The course will focus on the indigenous religions of India: Hinduism, Jainism, and Buddhism as well as Islam, Christianity, and Zoroastrianism as brought to western India by migrants.

Mode: Lecture/Experiential Learning.

2373. Japanese Culture (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0253.)

Cross Listed with Anthropology 2373 (0273).

Introduction to traditional and contemporary Japanese culture. Topics covered include: early literature, aesthetic principles as expressed in art and architecture, religion, gender roles, Japan`s shifting relationships with the outside world, rural communities and urban centers in the 20th century, and the construction of the self in modern Japan.

2374. The Anthropology of Modern China (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0254.)

Cross Listed with Anthropology 2374 (0274).

This course provides an introduction to the culture and society of the contemporary People`s Republic of China (P.R.C.). The first half of the course explores the dramatic changes in both rural and urban sectors of Chinese society since the turn of the century, with a particular focus on post-1949 Maoist and post-Mao socialist transformations. The second half of the course examines such topics as gender and the status of women, ethnic minorities, religion and healing, the self and society, the Party and the state, and P.R.C. narratives of modernity. Throughout, the P.R.C. will be examined as a society that embodies a distinctively Chinese synthesis of tradition and modernity.

2501. Introduction to East Asia: China (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0115.)

Cross Listed with History 2501 (0115).

Within the context of larger processes of socioeconomic and cultural change, this course examines the development of characteristic institutions and thought in traditional China and revolutionary transformation in the modern era. This approach is designed to provide the student with a basic understanding of state, society, and culture in China, the major themes of Chinese history, and more generally, broad processes of social change.

Note: AS Foundation Course. Usually offered in alternate years or summer on Main Campus.

2502. Introduction to East Asia: Japan (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0116.)

Cross Listed with History 2502 (0116).

A survey of Japanese history to the 20th century. Major themes include religious, political, and social change. Major topics are: the early centralized state, the rise of aristocratic culture, the emergence of the warrior class, and the modern transformation into an urban, industrial empire. Course materials include primary documents in translation and videos.

Note: AS Foundation Course. Usually offered in alternate years on Main Campus.

2503. Introduction to Southeast Asia: Insular (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0117.)

Cross Listed with History 2503 (0117).

Covers the histories of the Philippines, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Singapore from the 16th century until modern times. The course will introduce students to the island worlds of Southeast Asia, its peoples, their histories, societies, and economies. To familiarize students with non-Western worlds, lectures will be illustrated with videotapes, slides, and transparencies. Excerpts of articles and indigenous documents will also be used for discussion.

2504. Introduction to Southeast Asia: Mainland (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0118.)

Cross Listed with History 2504 (0118).

Covers the histories of Myanmar (Burma), Thailand, Laos, Cambodia, and Vietnam, from the 16th century until modern times. It is a course designed to introduce students to the analysis of such forces as religion, statecraft, and trade, and the manner in which they have shaped the mainland countries of Southeast Asia. Reference will be made to contemporary events taking place in the region, and students will be encouraged to follow these developments through the media and integrate their knowledge in class discussions. Course work will include readings, discussions, films, examinations, and book reviews.

2511. Introduction to Asian Business (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0104.)

Prerequisite: Permission of instructor (non-business majors).

Cross Listed with International Business 2501 (0100); General & Strategic Management 2501 (0100).

An overview of Asian business practices and their economic, political, and social contexts, with emphasis on Japan, China, Korea, and India. Asian Studies and other non-business majors/minors are welcome.

Note: Required for Asian Business and Society Certificate.

2606. Introduction to Islam (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0260.)

Cross Listed with Religion 2606 (0200).

Analysis of the tawhid, essence of Islam, of its basic categories for religious life, law, theology, literature, philosophy, art, and science. Survey of the major phenomena of Islamic civilization in their relation to tawhid.

2696. Introduction to Islam (3 s.h.) F. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ASIA ST W260.)

Cross Listed with Religion 2696 (W200).

Analysis of the tawhid, essence of Islam, of its basic categories for religious life, law, theology, literature, philosophy, art, and science. Survey of the major phenomena of Islamic civilization in their relation to tawhid.

2807. East Meets West (4 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0370.)

Cross Listed with Art History 2807 (0307).

A study of the impact of East-West cultural exchanges throughout Japanese art history, concentrating on four main areas: early Buddhist imagery and the influence of Hellenistic and Indian sculpture and paintings; Namban art (art of the southern barbarians) and the effect of the Western approach on the treatment of space in two-dimensional Japanese art; Japonisme and the impact of wood-block prints on European and American artists (Degas, Lautrec, Whistler, Mary Cassatt, etc.); Japanese architecture as an inspiration for modern architects (Bruno Taut, Le Corbusier, F. L. Wright) and cross-cultural Western influences on Japanese architects (Tange, Isozaki, Edward Suzuki, etc.).

2815. Japanese Art (4 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0270.)

Cross Listed with Art History 2815 (0215).

A look at Japanese history through art, with the primary focus on design and pattern. The course will examine all the major art forms from the earliest times to the present.

2818. Art of India (4 s.h.) S. $.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0218.)

Cross Listed with Art History 2818 (0218).

The art and architecture of the Indian sub-continent from 2500 B.C. to the present. The Hindu, Buddhist, Jain, and Islamic religions have been crucially important for the formation of South Asian culture and art. This class will emphasize how religious ideas have been made visually manifest in the arts. The role of art in the formation of modern India will also be examined.

Note: Field trips required.

3000. Special Topics in Asian Studies II (2 to 4 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0304.)

Provides a cross listing for regular and writing intensive courses in other departments when they have substantial Asian Studies content. Also used for directed readings and new courses. Click on the blue 6-digit CRN to see the topic.

Note: Cross listing arranged by Asian Studies Director.

3001. Earth Ethics (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0170.)

Cross Listed with Religion 3001 (0304).

This course examines the relationship of human and environmental science to ethical principles. By analyzing case studies that deal with resource sustainability, environmental protection, divergent views of technology and respect for all forms of life, students will assess individual life-styles and alternative visions of the good life on planet earth.

3052. Environmental Problems in Asia (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0238.)

Cross Listed with Environmental Studies 3052 (0238) and Geography & Urban Studies 3052 (0238).

Japan is used as an introduction and model for examining environmental issues in several east and southeast Asian countries. Emphasis is on deforestation, river basin development, urban planning, ecotourism, and role of non-governmental organizations.

3076. Metropolitan Tokyo (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0230.)

Cross Listed with Geography & Urban Studies 3076 (0228).

The growth and development of Tokyo, past and present. The course includes a profile of the city`s many neighborhoods, economic activities, architecture, and challenges for urban planners.

3082. Independent Study (1 to 4 s.h.) F S.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0305.)

Prerequisite: Permission of Asian Studies Director.

Directed reading and/or research on an Asian Studies topic. Required: A faculty supervisor, good study skills, and the ability to work independently.

3096. Writing Seminar II (2 to 4 s.h.) F S. RCI: WI.

Provides a cross listing for regular and writing intensive courses in other departments when they have substantial Asian Studies content. Also used for directed readings and new courses. Click on the blue 6-digit CRN to see the topic.

Note: Cross listing arranged by Asian Studies Director.

3101. Yoga and Tantric Mysticism (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0163.)

Cross Listed with Religion 3101 (0110).

Explores Yoga as well as Tantric Mysticism in India and South Asia.

3201. I-Ching, Tao, and Ch’an/Zen (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0164.)

Cross Listed with Religion 3201 (0117).

This course covers selected topics in the history of Taoist ideas and religious practice, which have broadly influenced China for two and a half millennia. Discussion topics include: symbols and divination; the philosophy of Lao-tzu and Chuang-tzu; the interaction between Taoism and Ch’an/Zen Buddhism; the Taoist/Ch’an influence on the Chinese literary tradition and ideals of beauty; the Taoist view on ch’i energy, meditation, sexuality, and the good life; and Taoism/Zen in America today.

3247. Ideology and Social Change in Japan (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0223.)

Cross Listed with Sociology 3247 (0297).

A sociological look at the conditions that have contributed to Japan`s emergence as a world-class economic force. How do culture, social organization, life style, ideology, and global political change to affect Japan`s rapid rise to power? Is Japan a closed society? What significance do factors such as racism, religion, education, family, the military, class, and population changes hold for understanding what happened in Japan and in Japan`s relations with outsiders, particularly the U.S.? How does this analysis affect the future of American sociology?

3251. China: Politics and Revolution (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0240.)

Cross Listed with Political Science 3251 (0236).

Contemporary Chinese government and politics, together with a survey of the political history of China in the 20th century. Emphasis is on the evolution of the political system and political culture through successive periods of reform and repression.

3252. East Asia and the United States (3 s.h.) F.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0241.)

Cross Listed with Political Science 3252 (0238).

The development of the Pacific Rim strategy in Japan over the past century and its spread into other regions of Asia, including South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong, Singapore, and even mainland China. The strengths, problems, and implications for the United States of this pattern of development are examined.

3301. Japanese Religions (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0161.)

Cross Listed with Religion 3301 (0119).

An introduction to Japanese religions, their origins, and development in the social, cultural and intellectual history of Japan. Religions covered are: Shinto, Japanese Buddhism, folk religions, Japanese Confucianism, and the New Religions. Some attention to expression of Japanese spirituality in the fine arts, martial arts, festivals, and rituals.

3302. Japanese Buddhism (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0167.)

Cross Listed with Religion 3302 (0120).

Introduction to classical thinkers of Japanese Buddhism: Kukai, Dogen, Shinran, Nichiran, Hakuin. Schools covered are: Shingon, Pure Land, Soto Zen, Rinzai Zen, Nichiren.

3521. Chinese Revolution (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0308.)

Cross Listed with History 3521 (0217).

The history of China from the Opium Wars to 1919. Topics to be discussed include the decline of the traditional order, the impact of imperialism, the rise of nationalism, the revolution of Sun Yat-sen, and socio-cultural ferment.

3522. Contemporary China (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0310.)

Cross Listed with History 3522 (0218).

The rise of nationalism, social-cultural changes, and revolutions since the late 19th century. Developments after 1949 in detail.

3531. Modern India (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0318.)

Cross Listed with History 3531 (0219).

Major political issues are colonialism, nationalism, non-violent political struggle, independence and adjustment, regionalism and tension, leadership in a third world movement, relations with the U.S.A. Social issues include coping with inequality, population explosion, hunger, regional violence, and new popular organizations. Major personalities: Mahatma Gandhi, Jawaharal Nehru, Sardar Patel, Indira Gandhi, Jayaprakash Narayan, Sri Aurobindo.

3541. Japan Today (3 s.h.) S.

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0314.)

Cross Listed with History 3541 (0220).

Examines significant social, economic, and cultural trends in Japan from 1945 to the 1990s-the Occupation; the `economic miracle,` state and society; the world of work; family, women and gender; international relations; impact of affluence; post-bubble Japan; and varying approaches to the study of postwar Japanese history and society.

Note: Usually offered alternate years on Main Campus.

3542. Women and Society in Japan (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0315.)

Cross Listed with History 3542 (0221) and Women`s Studies 3542 (0250).

This course analyzes the changing position of women in Japanese society from ancient times to the present. Through discussions, lectures, and audiovisual materials, students learn about goddesses, female diviners, empresses, the classical female writers, women in warrior culture, women in industrializing Japan, and Japanese women`s movements.

3551. History of Vietnam (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0312.)

Cross Listed with History 3551 (0222).

Emphasizing cultural, social, and economic factors, the course traces Vietnamese history from its mythological origins to the 21st century. Topics include indigenous social formations, the period of Chinese domination, the rise of independent Vietnamese dynasties, the French colonial era, the Vietnamese Revolution, and the three Indochina Wars, including the Vietnam Conflict in the 20th century. It will close with consideration of life under the current Socialist Republic of Vietnam.

3636. Asian Women in Transition (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0317.)

This course introduces and compares the experiences of women in Asia and Asian women in migration to the United States in the modern period, including rural and urban women, and ordinary and elite women in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include women in households, women and work, and women`s activism.

3696. Asian Women in Transition (3 s.h.) RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ASIA ST W317.)

Cross Listed with American Studies 2097 (W153), History 3696 (W215), and Women’s Studies 4696 (W249).

This course introduces and compares the experiences of women in Asia and Asian women in migration to the United States in the modern period, including rural and urban women, and ordinary and elite women in the late 19th and 20th centuries. Topics include women in households, women and work, and women`s activism.

3880. Topics in Comparative History (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0316.)

Cross Listed with HISTORY 3880 (0320):001 (Main); HISTORY 3880 (0320):101 (Ambler).

SECTION 001 (MAIN CAMPUS): Asian Biographies: Traditional and Otherwise. In the Confucian and Islamic traditions the writing of the lives of virtuous men has been central to the establishment of state legitimacy and the transmission of cultural values. In the past women were only rarely been included in the pantheon of heroes. This course considers the traditions and uses of biography and autobiography in Asia, a crucial issue in historiography, by examining traditional approaches to biography and autobiography, and by tracing the evolution of these traditions, as adapted to the needs of modern civil society and state.

SECTION 101 (AMBLER): Comparative Revolutions in South and Southeast Asia: Nationalism, Communism, and Tradition. This course examines 20th century transformations of Afghanistan, Indonesia and Vietnam, with an emphasis on the sources of ideas for revolutionary change. We will contrast the role of Western concepts, including those spread to colonial countries via the Communist International in Moscow, with the importance of indigenous beliefs and Asian religions in the revolutions in these three countries. We’ll also consider the role of colonial and imperial powers in encouraging obscurantist (often referred to as traditional) doctrines.

3900. Honors Topics in Asian Studies II (3 s.h.) RCI: HO.

(Formerly: ASIA ST H304.)

Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

Provides a cross listing for honors courses in other departments when they have substantial Asian Studies content. Also used for directed readings and new courses. Click on the blue 6-digit CRN to see the topic.

3904. Honors Earth Ethics (3 s.h.) RCI: HO.

Cross Listed with Environmental Studies 3904, Religion 3904.

What is, or should be, our relation to the natural world? Especially since we are presently living in a modern urban environment, have we perhaps outgrown nature? Is it something we have mastered? Is it primarily a luxury of sorts that we can go to for periodic enjoyment or relaxation? On the other hand, why do we seem to be in a burgeoning environmental crisis? Is it just greed? Too many people? Insufficient technology? How did we get to where we are? Or more immediately--and perhaps deeply--what fundamental beliefs, attitudes, and values shape our everyday actions, how we perceive and use (or misuse) the earth? What creative alternatives can we find, and how can we apply them? In addressing these kinds of questions we will explore both Western and Asian ways of conceiving and interacting with the natural world, past and present. Our approach will also be interdisciplinary, including materials from art, film and literature, as well a range of academic disciplines.

Note: This is an University Honors course.

3928. Honors Metropolitan Tokyo (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST H290.)

Cross Listed with GUS 3928 (H298).

This is an honors version of Metropolitan Tokyo. The course looks at the growth and development of Tokyo, Japan, past and present. It includes a profile of the city’s many neighborhoods, economic activities, architecture, and challenges for urban planners.

Note: Usually offered at Temple Japan.

3942. Honors Women and Society in Japan (3 s.h.) RCI: HO.

(Formerly: ASIA ST H315.)

This Honors course analyzes the changing position of women in Japanese society from ancient times to the present. Through discussions, lectures, and audiovisual materials, students learn about goddesses, female diviners, empresses, the classical female writers, women in warrior culture, women in industrializing Japan, and Japanese women`s movements.

Note: This is an Honors course.

3947. Honors Ideology and Social Change in Japan (3 s.h.) RCI: HO.

(Formerly: ASIA ST H223.)

Cross Listed with Sociology 3947 (H297).

A sociological look at the conditions that have contributed to Japan`s emergence as a world-class economic force. How did culture, social organization, lifestyle, ideology, and global political change fit together and react to affect Japan`s rapid rise to power? Is Japan a closed society? What significance do factors such as racism, religion, education, family, the military, class, and population changes hold for understanding what happened in Japan and in Japan`s relations with outsiders, particularly the United States? How does this analysis affect the future of American sociology?

Note: This is an Honors course.

4096. Seminar in Asian Studies (3 s.h.) S. RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ASIA ST W300.)

Prerequisite: Prior Asian Studies coursework.

In this capstone writing course you will do independent research on Asia. You'll deepen your skills in choosing bibliographic tools, in finding and evaluating authoritative sources, including primary materials translated from Asian languages, and organizing and properly formatting a research paper. In consultation with the instructor, you'll choose a topic to meet your interests and professional needs. Required for majors; good to take in junior year.

Note: Required for the Asian Studies major. May shift from spring to fall semester in Fall 2008. Mode: Seminar.

4268. Indian Philosophy: An Introduction (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0290.)

Cross Listed with Philosophy 4268 (0268).

Beginnings of Indian philosophical thinking in the hymns of Rig Veda and The Upanishads and the major schools of Indian philosophy as they took shape during the next thousand years. The latter include Samkhya, the Buddhist schools, the Vaiseskika, the Nyaya, and the major schools of Vedanta. Issues in metaphysics, epistemology, and logic emphasized.

4624. Modern Japan: Empire, War, Society (3 s.h.)

(Formerly: ASIA ST 0311.)

Was early modern Japan (1600-1867) static or dynamic? Do the roots of Japan`s modern achievements (1868-1945) lie in her early modern culture? What happened to Japan after the 1868 Meiji Restoration, and why? Was modernity a blessing or a curse? We`ll find answers to questions like these as we survey Japanese society, culture, and events and trends at home and abroad from the Tokugawa shogunate to the Pacific War. Assignments focus on writing a comparative review.

4696. Modern Japan: Empire, War, Society (3 s.h.) RCI: WI.

(Formerly: ASIA ST W311.)

Cross Listed with History 4697 (W340).

Was early modern Japan (1600-1867) static or dynamic? Do the roots of Japan`s modern achievements (1868-1945) lie in her early modern culture? What happened to Japan after the 1868 Meiji Restoration, and why? Was modernity a blessing or a curse? We`ll find answers to questions like these as we survey Japanese society, culture, and events and trends at home and abroad from the Tokugawa shogunate to the Pacific War. Assignments focus on writing a comparative review.

4901. Honors Comparative Philosophy of Religions (3 s.h.) RCI: HO.

(Formerly: ASIA ST H327.)

An introduction to the comparative philosophy of Asian and Western religions. After asking what is meant by the comparative philosophy of religion, the focus will be on a comparative philosophical study of basic concepts and issues in Western and Asian religious traditions. For example, we will look at the concepts of divine or ultimate reality, arguments for the existence of an ultimate reality, the relation of faith and reason, critiques of religion, the problem of evil, the concepts of personal destiny and immortality, the relation of religion to morality, religious and mystical experience, the nature of religious language, the problem of conflicting truth claims, and religious pluralism.

Note: This is an Honors course.
[Back] [Top]